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library SCUnd 






♦ # 



• 



The University of the State of New York 



New York State Library 



94th ANNUAL REPORT 



19 1 1 



TRANSMITTED TO THE LEGISLATURE MARCH 27, 1912- 



Uir-imim) (7-15E) 



^ Vv* ^ 



ALBANY .^ 
UNIVERSITY OP THE STATE OP NEW YORK 



» 



THE UNIVERSITY OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 

Regents of the Uniyersity 
(October 15, 19x3) 
WiUi years when terms expire 

1917 St Clair McKelway M.A. LL.D. D.C.L. 

L.H. D. Chancellor ------- - Brookljm 

1914 Pliny T. Sexton LL.B. LL.D. Fice Chancellor Palmyra 

1915 Albert Vander Veer M.D. M.A. Ph.D. LL.D. Albany 

1922 Chester S. Lord M.A. LL.D. ----- New York 

1918 William Nottingham M.A. Ph.D. LL.D. - - Syracuse 
192 1 Francis M. Carpenter ------ - Mount Kisco 

1923 Abram I. Elkus LL.B. D.C.L. ----- New York 

19 16 Lucius N. Littauer B.A. ------ GloversviUe 

1924 Adelbert Moot -_---___- Buffalo 

1925 Charles B. Alexander M.A. LL.B. LL.D. Lit.D. Tuxedo 

19 19 John Moore -----__-- -Elmira 

1920 Andrew J. Shipman M.A. LL.B. LL.D. - - New York 

President of the Uniyersity 
and Commissioner of Education 

John Huston Finley M.A. LL.D. 

Assistant Commissioners 

Augustus S. Downing M.A. L.H.D. LL.D. For Higher Education 
Charles F. Wheelock B.S. LL.D. For Secondary Education 
Thomas E. Finegan M.A. Pd.D. LL.D. For Elementary Education 

Director of State Library 

James L Wyer, Jr, M.L.S. 

Director of Science and State Museum 

John M. Clarke Ph.D. D.Sc. LL.D. 

Chiefs of Divisions 

Administration, George M. Wiley M.A. 

Attendance, James D. Sullivan 

Educational Extension, William R. Watson B.S. 

Examinations, Harlan H. Horner B.A. 

History, James A. Holden B.A. 

Inspections, Frank H. Wood M.A. 

Law, Frank B. Gilbert B.A. 

Library School, Frank K. Walter M.A. M.L.S. 

Public Records, TftOBMy C. Quinn 

School libraries, Sherman Williams Pd.D. 

Statistics, Hiram C. Case 

Visual Instruction, Alfred W. Abrams Ph.B. 

Vocational Schools. Arthur D. Dean D.Sc. 



State of New York 



No. 60. 



IN ASSEMBLY 



March 27, 1912 



94th ANNUAL REPORT 



ON THE 



New York State Library 



Hon. Edwin A. Merritt, Jr 

Speaker of the Assembly 

Assembly Chamber, Albany, N. Y, 

Ptirsuant to the provisions of section 11 16, chapter 140, of the 
Laws of 1 9 10, the 94th Annual Report of the State Library is 
herewith submitted to the Legislature. 

Very respectfully yotirs 

St Clair McICblway 
Vice Chancellor of the University 
Andrew S. Draper 
Commissioner of Education 



O 



63099 



CONTENTS 

PAGE 

The State Library 7 

Destruction by fire 7 

Losses and salvage 9 

The Dutch records ' , 31 

Reorganization 32 

Temporary quarters 32 

Manuscript restoration 33 

Internal reorganization 34 

Order and accession work 36 

Classification 39 

Cataloging -. 40 

Library for the Blind 44 

Indexing and editing the Session Laws 45 

The new State Library 46 

Legislation and appropriations 46 

Scope of the collections 47 

The new building 51 

New York State Library School 53 

Educational extension •. 55 

Charters, registry and transfers 58 

Expenditures 62 

Field work 63 

Round table meetings 64 

New York Libraries 64 

Traveling libraries 64 

Library progress 66 

Statistics of tax support 71 

Library buildings 71 

Appendixes 

1 Chapter 901 , Laws of 191 1 73 

2 Chapter 521 , Laws of 191 2 75 

3 Editorial comment of the State press 76 

4 Gifts for six months *. , 83 

Index '87 

Supplements 

1 Best books of 191 1 (Bibliography bulletin no. 51) 

2 25th. annual report of New York State Library School, 1911 (Library School 

bulletin no. 30) 



/ ' '■. 



UniYersit; oi the State oi New York Balletin 

Entered as second-class matter August 2, 1913 at the post office at Albany, N. Y., under the act 

of August 24, 1912 

Published fortnightly 



No. 645 



ALBANY, N. Y. 



JuNB 15, 1913 



New York State Library 



REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR 



IQII 



Page 

The State Library 6 

Destruction by fire 7 

Losses and salvage 9 

The Dutch records 31 

Reorganization 32 

Temporary quarters 32 

Manuscript restoration 33 

Internal reorganization 34 

Order and accession work 36 

Classification 39 

Cataloging 40 

Library for the Blind 44 

Indexing and editing the Ses- 
sion Laws 45 

The new State Library .•••.••• 4-6 

Legislation and appropriations 46 

Scope of the collections 47 

The new building 51 



Page 

New York State Library School ... 53 

Educational extension 55 

Charters, registry and transfers . . 58 

Expenditures 62 

Field work 63 

Round table meetings. 64 

New York libraries 64 

Traveling libraries 64 

Library progress 66 

Statistics of tax support 71 

Library buildings 71 

Appendixes 73 

1 Chap. 901, Laws of 1911 73 

2 Chap. 521, Laws of 1912 75 

3 Editorial comment of the State 
press 76 

4 Gifts for six months 83 

Index 87 



New York State Library 

Librarians since the establishment of the Library 

1819-24 John Cook 

1824-30 Calvin Pepper 

1830-40 James Maher 

1840-43 Robert Brown 

1843-44 William Cassidy 

1844-48 John L. Tillinghast 

1848-62 Alfred B. Street 

1862-87 Henry A. Homes 

1887-88 George R. Howell [acting] 
1 888-1 905 Melvil Dewey 

1906-8 Edwin H. Anderson 

1908- James I. Wyer, Jr 

Library staff 

Administration 

James I. Wyer, Jr, Director 
Walter S. Biscoe, Senior librarian 
Florence Woodworth, Director's assistant 
Carl P. P. Vitz, Director's assistant 

Sections 

Law library, Frederick D. Colson 

Medical library, Ada Bunnell 

Reference section, Frank L. Tolman 

Legislative reference section, Clarence B. Lester 

Manuscripts section, Arnold J. F. van Laer 

Order section, Carl P. P. Vitz 

Bibliography and cataloging, Walter S. Biscoe 

Shelf section, Joseph Gavit 

Library for the blind, Mary C. Chamberlain 

Division of Educational Extension 
William R. Eastman, Chief 

Library School 
Frank K. Walter, Vice Director 

[6] 



New York State Library 

REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR 191 1 

To the Regents of the University and the Commissioner of Educa- 
tion of the State of New York 

This document nominally reports on the State Library for the 
year ending September 30, 191 1. Actually it deals with but the 
last half of the year, for on March 29, 191 1, the Library was 
almost totally destroyed by fire. The manuscript, ready for print- 
ing, of the usual detailed report for the year ending September 30, 
1910, was burned. The summary of it in the seventh annual report 
of the New York State Education Department, in the chapters en- 
titled The New York State Library and Educational Extension 
(pages 237-56) must now suffice. For the year ending September 
30, 191 1, all records, statistics, correspondence and data from which 
might have been prepared a futile report for the first six months, 
perished with the books and manuscripts they would have recorded 
and described. 

DESTRUCTION BY FIRE 

The catastrophe is probably the greatest in modern library annals. 
The burning of the Kaiserliche Universitats und Landes Bibliothek 
in Strassburg during the Franco-Prussian War did not destroy so 
many books. The fire at the Biblioteca Nazionale in Turin (1904) 
was notable for the large number of rarities and manuscript treas- 
ures lost, though no more, numerically, than 25,000 books and 2000 
manuscripts were destroyed. The combined library losses at San 
Francisco in 1906, while perhaps aggregating nearly half a million 
volimies, were not comparable in the character of the books and 
manuscripts burned, for the entire Bancroft Library and a great 
part of the Sutro collection escaped. At Albany a round half mil- 
lion of books, three hundred thousand manuscripts, the costly ap- 
paratus of administration, the whole representing the skilled and 
devoted labors of many faithful and zealous library workers during 
almost a century — all these, forming a collection ranking with the 
first half dozen in the western hemisphere and among the first twenty 
in the world, were swept away in a few hot and disheartening hours. 
The work of a great going concern — a work reaching not alone into 
every comer and county of the State, but through correspondence, 
publications and exchange into every part of the world — a work of 

[7] 



8 NEW YORK STATE LIBRARY 

educational extension, of library instruction, book acquisition, and of 
diversified and expert reference service was cut off between two 
days. The fact that within a stone's throw of the fire stood a 
superb new building almost ready to receive the Library and to pro- 
tect it from just the catastrophe which overtook it and which had 
been dreaded for so many 'years, gives a touch of unusual tragedy 
to the situation. The fire, resulting from an all-night legislative 
caucus in the Assembly chamber, got a good start in a part of the 
Capitol at that hour scantily furnished with watchmen and with 
slender and wholly inadequate fire protection, and by the time it 
broke into the neighboring rooms of the State Library it was so 
fierce that the Library fire apparatus was powerless. Once in the 
Library quarters thoroughgoing disaster was inevitable, for despite 
repeated emphatic and plain-spoken warnings during the past fifteen 
years from those having charge of the State Library, the State 
had made no suitable provision for the safety of the collection of 
books, and conditions had been allowed to grow up which invited 
the very calamity which befell. It is hard to see how there could 
ever be a more potent argument for the segregation of great 
libraries in buildings built to house libraries and administered by 
those having libraries actively in charge, than is afforded by this 
fire, when all the circumstances which were responsible for it are 
taken into account. The conditions which permitted it to gain 
serious headway and which seemed powerless to arrest its rapid 
spread were those arising directly from the partisan system of 
administering and caring for public buildings, a system which keeps 
veterans in responsible positions of watch and guard until they are 
seventy-five or eighty years old, which is a stranger to fire drills 
and sufficient patrol and which must always fail of eifective esprit- 
de-corps. The plain lesson for libraries from the New York State 
Library fire is that no valuable collection of books should be housed 
in a building occupied, administered and cared for as are un- 
doubtedly all the state capitol buildings in the country. 

The fire started between two and three o'clock in the morning 
in the Assembly library on the third floor of the northwest part 
of the Capitol. The State Library had no control over nor con- 
nection with this room. Apparently the flames were carried into 
the State Library by leaping from window to window across the 
corner of a court or light shaft some twenty or thirty feet square, 
which at this point separated the Assembly from the law library 
rooms. Almost immediately after reaching the law library the 



■• •: 



• •• 












• • 



REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR I9II 9 

smoke filled the entire west front of the building from the third 
floor to the top, and the flames gutted the three floors occupied 
by the Library with almost incredible swiftness and ferocity. The 
Library night watchman, Mr Samuel J. Abbott, was apparently 
overcome by smoke and found himself unable to escape, for his 
body was later recovered from the ruins. None of the officers of 
the Library became aware of the fire until too late to enter any 
of the rooms occupied by it. Such a thoroughgoing disaster in a 
building supposed to be reasonably proof against fire, almost passes 
belief. It is amazing that so many books in such a building could 
have been so speedily and completely consumed. Some idea of 
this and of the ensuing desolation may be had from the accompany- 
ing pictures reproduced from photographs taken a day or two 
after the fire. 

LOSSES AND SALVAGE 

Any definite or comprehensive statement of losses would be little 
less than a full catalog of the various collections. No book was 
rescued during the fire from any part of the Library quarters. 
All books saved were taken out after the fire had spent itself. 
No detailed statement of salvage is feasible except for the manu- 
script collections, for which such statement appears in the following 
paragraphs revised from the first draft occurring in the Journal 
of the Meeting of the Board of Regents of the University of the 
State of New York, June 21, 191 1, pages 426-38. Besides the 
following described manuscripts actually rescued after the fire, 
forty-five others of unusual rarity and renown which were partic- 
ularly described in the Regents Journal, June 17, 1909, pages 122- 
25, and January 25, 191 1, pages 346-49, were kept in a safe in a 
part of the Capitol not reached by the fire. 

What remained to the Library after the fire may be fairly ac- 
curately stated as follows: 

Books saved belonging to the State Library proper, includ- 
ing those in hands of borrowers 7 000 

Traveling library books loaned throughout the -State, in- 
cluding several hundred books for the blind 40 000 

^Manuscripts saved 80 000 

Duplicates stored in other buildings 200 000 

These are being sorted and will yield many thousands of volumes for 
the new library 






Several hundred coins and a few relics, notably those re^." •••:; 
lating to Washington 



lO NEW YORK STATE LIBRARY 

Books. The salvage came wholly from the main reading room 
and the adjoining room and the alcove devoted to genealogy and 
local history, which from their position and the fact that they had 
high ceilings confined the principal ravages of the fire to the upper 
parts of the rooms. The salvage from these rooms comprised 
general reference books, Poole periodicals, bibliographies and in- 
dexes, local history from the New England and Middle Atlantic 
States and a few dozen volumes of individual genealogy. Nearly 
everything saved had the covers and edges burned, and when this 
was not the case the books were thoroughly watersoaked and in 
many cases had been standing in water from fifteen to thirty-six 
hours. The drying, cleaning and rebinding of these books presented 
varied and difficult questions. Many rescued from the ruins proved 
to be odd volumes of sets or too badly damaged to be worth 
keeping. Many single volumes, sometimes whole sets, were dis- 
carded as being palpably more costly to rebind than to replace. 

In saving books and manuscripts for the State Library, work 
of the utmost discomfort and danger was cheerfully and zealously 
done by the men of the Library staflf, who endured cold, wet and 
smoke for days, regardless of health, hours, and actual personal 
loss of clothing and effects. On their own initiative and anticipat- 
ing request or suggestion, Messrs Vitz, Biscoe, Tolman, Colson, 
van Laer, Lester and Gavit, heads of the different sections of the 
Library, and others, for two weeks did the work of laborers, which 
no one else had the requisite knowledge of books and locations to 
do so well or at all. 

Manuscripts. Especially difficult and indeed dramatic was the 
work done in saving the manuscripts in the first forty-eight hours 
after the fire. For the vigorous initiative and prompt action with 
which this work was prosecuted and for the considerable measure 
of success which followed, the State is very particularly indebted 
to two men, Mr I. N. Phelps Stokes of New York City, who was 
sent to the scene the day following the fire by several of the trus- 
tees of the New York Public Library, and Mr A. J. F. van Laer, 
the State Archivist. Their work may best be told in their own 
words reprinted below from contemporary newspaper accounts, 
though these accounts fail to reveal the extent of the dangers braved 
:• .in,th€;^w50i^ of rescue. As sufficiently indicative of the actual risks 
^•*io llfe-'aiai limb, it is proper to say that twice during the first day 
of rescue work Mr Stokes was carried from the manuscript room^ 



Room 35, the principal reading room. It was from 
the central part of this room and from a small side 
room adjoining that the only considerable number of 
books was saved. The effect of the fierce heat is seen 
in the disintegration of the group of marble columns 
supporting the arches. The circular object on the gal- 
lery rail is a clock frame. 



:• •. 



r* 



•«• • 



•-• 



•;• 



•-• 






REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR I9II II 

unconscious from the smoke, and each time, upon being revived, he 
insisted on returning. The following account by Mr van Laer is 
reprinted from the Albany Argus for April 4, 191 1 : 

The State Archivist tells of his efforts to salvage books and papers, with 
the assistance of I. N. Phelps Stokes, the salvage expert, whom the trustees 
of the New York Public Library sent to aid the Department in organizing 
the work of rescuing valuable documents. When they first entered the 
manuscript room of the burned library with a ladder, Mr van Laer says, 
" The sight was appalling. Not a vestige of books, bookcases or desks 
was to be seen. Nothing but an empty shell, with four feet of smoldering 
debris on the floor. Fires were starting up in various places, a stream oi 
water played on the ruins and water poured down from the floor above. 
It seemed well-nigh hopeless to attempt to rescue anything under such cwi- 
ditions, but Mr Stokes insisted that, if anything were to be saved, work 
must be begun at once. Hurrying to the main reading room of the Library,- 
the archivist secured the help of four or five members of the Library staff, 
who worked with zest, and under his direction soon recovered some of the 
older Dutch records in a fairly good state of preservation. Later, Adjutant 
General Verbeck appeared, who offered his services to Mr Stokes in the 
name of the Governor, and promptly organized a line of guardsmen to 
remove the records to the office of the clerk of the Senate. With the 
efficient aid of his men good progress was made. The men were directed 
to dig carefully where the most valuable records used to be shelved and, 
as soon as anything came to light, it was carefully lifted out and' carried 
away. Many of the volumes were so hot they could hardly be touched 
with the hand and some were actually burning along the edges. 

"As soon as one spot was cleared down to the floor, the debris next to 
it were turned over and everything taken out that was still legible. Grad- 
ually about half the floor space was gone over and to make room the men 
were told to throw the already examined debris out of the window. The 
archivist stood himself near the window and watched every shovelful that 
was thrown out, many fragments being rescued in that way. All this took 
place in a drenching downpour of water from the floor above. No stop 
was made for luncheon. When evening came, many of the most valuable 
records had been saved, and Mr Stokes and the archivist felt themselves 
richly rewarded for their trying experience. To prevent the fire from 
breaking out afresh, water was turned on during the night, and next morning 
at seven o*clock work was continued. The condition of things that second 
day showed the wisdom of Mr Stokes^s timely action, all the books and 
papers that were found being either more charred or thoroughly water- 
soaked. By 6 p. m. practically everything that could be saved, including 
nearly one hundred volumes of colonial and State records, several hundred 
bundles of papers, about a thousand coins and medals, and the General 
Worth swords, were safely placed under a guard in the office of the clerk 
of the Senate. 

" Saturday morning, the last scraps of papers were gathered up and during 
the day everything was removed to 162 State street, the new headquarters of 
the State Library, where Mr Frank L. Tolman, the reference librarian, and 
the archivist were busy till 11.30 p. m. arranging the most valuable and water- 
soaked material on temporary lath racks, to let it dry over Sunday. The 
loss of historical documents is immense, but thanks to Mr Stokes's wise 
counsel, about 10 per cent of the entire collection and perhaps 30 per cent 
of the most valuable material is saved." 

Mr Stokes's story is reprinted from the New York Times of 
April 30, 191 1 and is as follows: 

"When the fire broke out," said Mr Stokes, "the trustees of the New 
York Public Library called a hasty meeting and decided that some one 
should go up to Albany to carry the sympathy of the institution to the 



12 NEW YORK STATE LIBRARY 

authorities of the burned library and express their desire to cooperate in 
any possible way. They asked me to go, so the morning after the day on 
which the fire broke out I arrived in Albany. I presented the sympathy of 
the New York trustees and then went out to see what had happened. 

" I was told by those who had watched the fire that flames from the room 
of the archives window had burst out and spread half across the street. 
So it was generally believed that there was no chance of finding intact 
any of the priceless, unduplicated records the room had contained. Mr 
van Laer, the archivist, however, cherished hopes, and I thought, too, there 
might be a way of saving something. 

" Torrents of water had been poured on the building, and we figured out 
that the soaked manuscripts might not have burned, that at least those on 
the lower shelves might have been protected by the fallen rubbish from 
above. However, there was no means of gaining access to the room. The 
stairway was gone, and that part of the building had been declared unsafe. 

" Being an architect, I came to the conclusion that there was not suffi- 
cient weight on the floors above to make it unsafe to enter that part of the 
building if an entrance could be effected. We decided to ask the fire depart- 
ment to give us ladders so as to make an entrance into the third story, but 
while arrangements were being made for this scheme, we studied the plans 
of the building and found that it would be possible to get to the floor the 
archives were on through the burned floor of the room above the apart- 
ment of the clerk of the Senate. 

" We promptly did this, and by breaking through the panel of the door, 
were able to climb into the room where the early records of New York's 
colonial history had been kept. 

" The sight did not encourage us in the hope that anything could be saved. 
Everything had been burned, the shelves and desks, and there was four feet 
of smoldering debris on the floor. From the ceiling streams of water 
leaked through. Here and there little fires were starting. It seemed a hope- 
less proposition. 

" Still, knowing the power of resistance to fire that compressed paper 
possesses, we made the attempt. Mr van Laer, through many years of 
familiarity with the archives, knew exactly where to look. 

" * Here,* he said, * were some early Dutch records, of the State.* 

" When we got down through the debris, we caught a glimpse of paper 
which, while charred and water soaked, was still decipherable. Here were 
some remaining Dutch records. Evidently, our idea that some things might 
be saved was not altogether a vain one. 

"As quickly as possible we climbed out again and sought the Governor. 
We laid before him our plan for salvage, and he readily saw that there was 
not a moment to be lost. He promised his prompt cooperation, and we got 
back to the scene of action without loss of time. Adjutant General Ver- 
beck sent soldiers, who helped us dig in the rubbish and formed a chain 
to pass the baskets full of saved stuff to safety. 

" The water came down, not in streamlets, but in a steady downpour, filled 
with soot. It was indescribably dirty and hopeless looking; but, fortunately, 
we had to waste no time in looking for the most valuable records, since 
van Laer could point out where they should be and recognized them the 
moment they were brought to light. 

" The room where the archives were contained was a continuation of the 
corridor. It was about forty feet long and fifteen feet wide, and had a 
window at the farther end. When the flames broke through the panels of 
the door, spreading through the corridor, the length of the room and the 
window at the other side made a kind of flue for the flames to sweep 
through, and this, of course, had made the spectacular blaze that was seen 
during the fire. The manuscripts around the upper shelves had been promptly 
burned to bits, and, just as we had hoped, their fall and the streams of 
water poured in by the fire engine had saved some of the things at the 
bottom. 



. Room 55, State Library 



REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR I9II I3 

" Many of the Volumes were burned when we got to them and were so 
hot they could not be held in the hands. We had a hose with us and were 
constantly obliged to turn on more water to put out the little fires that would 
break out every once in a while. There was much smoke and discomfort. 
Although I had assured the men that the building was safe, whenever there 
was a noise as of something falling they would be startled and anxious to 
quit work, for which nobody could blame them. 

" We tried to sort things roughly and to indicate even as we worked iii 
the midst of the debris of the room which were the most important papers. 
There was a constant line of baskets passing from soldier to soldier. In this 
way we were able to get out what Mr van Laer considered the most valuable 
documents during the first day. 

"At seven o'clock the next morning we were back at work. Fire had 
broken out during the night, and more water had been turned on, so that 
our task was harder than the day before. Then, you will remember that 
immediately after the fire a cold spell set in with a high wind. Much of 
the debris at the bottom was frozen stiff, and could not be taken from the 
floor, and once in a while a loose paper would be caught up and whirled 
away. 

" There was some qriticism of this flying paper afterward, but I do not 
see how working under such conditions we could have prevented a few 
leaves from escaping, and the only wonder is that the wind, rushing through 
the gutted building, did not whirl away more of them. 

" We worked hard all through the second day, and at the end were able 
to feel that about everything had been got out that could possibly be saved. 
Of course, much that we rescued was in an indecipherable condition, and 
most of it is in a dreadful muddle, so that it will take a year or more for 
the archivist and his assistant, who alone know the manuscripts thoroughly, 
to get them into order and make them available for use. 

" The useless debris was thrown out of the window as we dug, Mr van 
Laer himself standing by to examine every shovelful and make sure that no 
fragment that could be of value was thrown out. 

" It will be remembered that the loss of General Washington's s\frord and 
the General Worth sword was reported at the time of the fire. The Wash- 
ington sword was recovered rather curiously. As we worked the first day 
I saw a workman pick up a twisted bit of metal and show it to another. 
The other shook his head, thinking the thing useless, and the finder threw 
it away. ■ 

" Mechanically I noticed the incident and saw where it fell. I thought the 
bit of iron was one of the supporters of the shelves. The whole room 
was filled with bits of twisted metal. 

" The next day I heard of the loss of the Washington sword and recalled 
the piece of twisted iron I had seen the men handle. It occurred to me that 
that bit might have been the sword, and as I remembered where it had 
fallen I got the men to dig there, and it turned out just as we hoped. It 
was the sword, very much out of. shape, but it can easily be straightened and 
made the same as ever. 

" Bishop Doane kindly gave us the use of the house at 162 State street 
for our manuscripts. They were all taken there as they were rescued. The 
reference librarian fitted up shelves of laths, where the soaked material was 
put to dry. 

"A corps was organized from the women employees of the Library, and 
they set to work to tear off the covers of many of the books. The water 
collected in the covers and kept the inside damp, so it was better to separate 
the two and let them dry apart. We telephoned to Herbert Putnam, the 
librarian of Congress, and asked him to send Mr Berwick, who has charge 
of the repairing of the national archives, to offer suggestions. Mr Berwick 
promptly responded. 

" The Catholic Society came to the rescue later, when the house at 162 
State street was filled to overflowing, and gave their large gymnasium as a 
temporary drying place for the books and manuscripts. This gives room to 
work in, and all the saved records are there still, so far as I know." 



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From a point where the floor of Room SS once v 
looking through Che door into Room 54 and down i 
Rooms 34 and 44 



14 NEW YORK STATE LIBRARY 

Lessons from the fire. In the work of taking manuscripts from 
the ruins two interesting facts became plain. First, that had the 
cases and shelving in the manuscript room been metal and not 
wood there would have been no salvage at all. The wooden shelves 
and uprights were quickly weakened and burned through and the 
books on them were thus allowed to fall to the floor in a pile which, 
when covered with debris, burned slowly and furnished consider- 
able salvage when the heat had cooled sufficiently to allow it to be 
examined at all. Thus the chief manuscript salvage was from the 
volumes on the lower shelves, which were buried the deepest, as 
the fire brought down upon them the wreckage of books, shelving 
and furniture from the upper portions of the rooms. This con- 
dition resulted from a fierce fire which had escaped all control and 
had swept through the rooms unchecked. The merit of metal 
shelving, of course, is best revealed as a preventive or check in 
the incipient stages of a blaze. 

It was possible to make a very eflfective comparison between 
wood and metal shelving, for in rooms almost adjacent to the 
manuscript quarters there was a considerable installation of metal 
shelves and office furniture. At first sight it looked as though the 
books on the metal shelves were comparatively unharmed, but the 
moment they were touched it was discovered that they had been 
literally crisped through and fell to pieces often into a sort of 
powder or pile of little chips of brown paper, at even the most 
careful touch which was necessary to take them from the shelves. 

A second lesson indicates the high importance of beginning sal- 
vage work after a fire at the earliest possible instant. The foregoing 
narratives of Mr Stokes and Mr van Laer show clearly that there 
was no delay in beginning the salvage of our manuscripts. Indeed 
for the first day the work was prosecuted under such conditions 
of fire, smoke and water as to be definitely dangerous to life. The 
comfortable assurance is afforded, as the matter is reviewed, that 
all manuscripts were saved that could have been saved. The same 
necessity, however, exists in the case of books. And in this work 
in the State Library it was not possible to use a sufficient number 
of people in the work of salvage who were acquainted with loca- 
tion and who could give to the work the care and pains necessary 
to secure any reasonable result whatever. As the work progressed 
it became clear that with each passing day the books taken from 
the ruins were less and less likely to be worth saving at all. 



From a point where the floor of Room 55 once \ 
looking through the door into Room 54 and down i 
Rooms 34 and 44 



/ 



: .•' 






«_• 






REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR I9II 1 5 

Manuscripts of Library publications. Another form of loss 
and a peculiarly poignant one, was the destruction of nine manu- 
scripts of various numbers of the different series of publications 
maintained by the State Library. Only those who have actually 
done similar bibliographic work, indexing, revision, editing and 
translating, will appreciate the amount of time and labor which 
had been expended on these manuscripts (many of which had been 
in preparation for several years) and the hopelessness of attempting 
the reconstruction of some of them, in the face of the calamity 
which destroyed not only them but the very collections which they 
described or were designed to illustrate. 

A list of these manuscripts follows, with statement in each case 
as to whether the enterprise has been, or will be, resumed. 

Check list of genealogies and of books on heraldry in the New York 
State Library 

This manuscript was almost, or quite, ready for the printer and represented 
the work of three or four different people for a period of nearly five years. 
The collection upon which it was based was one of the best two or three 
in the country, but as it was almost totally destroyed, there can be of course 
no present thought of attempting another list of genealogies, even though the 
Library has bought several thousand since the fire. 

Comparative summary and index of state legislation for the years 
1909 and 1910 

The manuscript for these years, almost ready for the printer, was 
totally destroyed, together with the consolidated index on cards, representing 
the items which have been included in the successive printed indexes since 
1890. When to this is added the fact that the entire law library was burned 
and that these manuscripts can not be replaced without full sets of session 
laws from all states for recent years, it is clear that if this work is ever 
restored, it will not be very soon. Our indexers are at work on the volume 
for 191 1, but unless legislative appropriation provides additional expert in- 
dexers, it is obvious that the current work on the index from year to year 
will consume all time and help available for this purpose. 

United States government documents 

A new edition of Library School Bulletin 21, well advanced toward publi- 
cation, was burned, together with a multitude of notes, criticisms and sug- 
gestions, covering the five years since the first edition was published. These 
it is impossible to replace, and no revision of the pamphlet can ever be as 
good as when made with them before the editor. It is possible that some 
day, when a considerable document collection is again on the shelves, this 
bulletin may be revised; but it is not a plan to which a day can be definitely 
assigned. 

Library School register, 1 887-191 2 

For five or six years material. has been collected looking toward a new 
edition of a register of students of the State Library School, to be issued 
in its twenty-fifth year. After the fire it became necessary to begin the 
work anew. The new edition, the first since 1902, has been completed, is 
now in press and will be distributed at the dedication of the new building. 



1 6 NEW YORK STATE LIBRARY 

Check list of session laws for American states 

This undertaking was in preparation pursuant to an informal understand- 
ing with the Library of Congress that it would publish a similar check list 
covering United States laws. The list for three or four states was com- 
plete at the time of the fire; and a mass of material was in work, covering 
many of the other states. It was based upon the State Library's unusual 
collection of original session laws. Until another such collection, or a 
better one, is available, it will be idle to think of resuming the work. 

New York Libraries for April 191 1 

The manuscript for a complete number was actually in the hands of the 
printing section at the time of the fire. After its destruction the inde- 
fatigable editor prepared an entire new number, and the April number of the 
journal appeared with but few days delay. 

Translation of volume i of the manuscript Dutch records 

Mr van Laer and his assistant had been at work on this translation for 
nearly a year. It was almost ready, but, with the volume he was engaged in 
translating, was totally destroyed. Every one of the other twenty-two manu- 
script volumes was saved. 

Tentative list of best books for 1910 

This list commonly issued during the first ten days of April each year 
was on the point of going to the printer. The destruction of the manu- 
script and of all the books listed in it together with the bibliographic ap- 
paratus which made the list possible put quite out of the question any 
attempt to duplicate it. It was accordingly omitted entirely. 

Director's report for the year ending September 30, 1910 

This was the manuscript for the usual detailed report of the Director. 
It was well advanced. As all data and records necessary to reproduce it as 
well as the Library itself were swept away, there seemed little use in com- 
piling an extended report anew even were it possible. A summary report 
covering the same year appears as titles 5 and 6 in the seventh report of 
the Education Department for 1910, pages 237-56; for the Division of Edu- 
cational Extension, practically the same statistics, with additions, are included 
in the 94th report of the State Library, pages 55-72. 

Manuscripts. The following list of the principal sets of manu- 
scripts in the State Library prior to the fire shows the approximate 
extent of salvage from each set as it can be determined on Septem- 
ber I, 1912. 

The manuscript collection constituted the largest and, from the 
point of view of the historian, the most important body of archives 
in the possession of the State. The manuscripts were acquired by 
gift, by purchase, and by transfer from various State offices during 
a period of sixty-five years and embraced practically all that had 
been preserved of the executive, legislative and judicial records of 
the administration of the province under Dutch regime, 1630-64, 



REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR IQII I7 

1673-74; the executive and legislative papers, other than land 
papers, of the English colonial administration, 1664-73, 1674-1783; 
the executive and legislative papers of the provincial administration 
during the Revolution, 1775-78; the legislative papers from the 
formation of State government in 1777 to 1910; the papers of the 
Council of Appointment, 1 777-1821 ; the election returns, 1777- 
1905; the census returns, 1801-1905; the correspondence of Sir 
William Johnson and of Governors George Clinton and Daniel D. 
Tompkins; the archives of the manor of Rensselaerswyck from its 
first settlement in 1630 to about 1870; a large collection of papers 
relating to Vermont, known as the Henry Stevens papers; several 
series of transcripts from foreign archives and a number of mis- 
cellaneous books and papers relating to special persons and topics. 

Of this general collection of manuscripts a large and important 
portion remains, owing to the circumstances that two years ago 
a number of the most valuable manuscripts were removed from tb^ 
manuscripts room to a safe in the office of the Commissioner ot 
Education on the first floor of the Capitol, where they were not 
exposed to any danger from the fire, and that other important 
and early records were saved by being buried during the fire under 
a large mass of legislative papers which fell from the mezzanine 
floor above. The most serious losses occurred among the executive 
records of the English colonial period, the Sir William Johnson 
manuscripts, the Clinton papers, the Tompkins papers and the early 
Senate papers, which stood in a double-faced case and were ex- 
posed to the fire on both sides. A detailed statement of the losses 
and the extent to which the principal sets have been printed is 
given in the following list. In reading this list it must be borne 
in mind that the term " volume " applies in most cases not to an 
actual volume, but to papers which were formerly bound as a 
volume, since after the fire all manuscript volumes were taken apart 
and the manuscripts placed between blotting paper to dry. When 
manuscripts are described as being " in good condition," it means 
either that the paper did not suffer at all or that the writing is 
intact though the paper is burned along the edges. When said to 
be *' in fair condition," it means that the paper is badly scorched 
but that the greater part of the writing is still preserved; when 
described as " in poor condition," it must be understood that the 
documents are very badly burned and that of some paper? only 
fragments are left. 



l8 NEW YORK STATE LIBRARY 

MANUSCRIPTS IN THE SAFE IN THE OFFICE OF THE COMMISSIONER 

OF EDUCATION 

Charter of the Colony from Charles II to the Duke of York, 1664 

Duke's Laws, 1664-65 

Dongan Laws, 1683-84 

Constitution of the State of New York, 1777 

Constitution of die State of New York, 1821 

Constitution of the State of New York, 1B46 

Proposed Constitution of the State of New York, 1867-69; rejected 
except sixth article 

Constitution of the State of New York, 1894 

Journal of the Proceedings of the Convention of the State of New 
York to ratify tlie proposed Constitution of the United States, 
held at Poughkeepsie, June 17-July 26, 1788 

Ratification of th« proposed Constitution of the United States by 
the State of New York in Convention assemhled at Poughkeepsie, 
July 26, 1788 

Autographs of the Signers of the Declaration of Independence 

Andre Papers. 13 manuscripts 

Washington's Opinion of the Surviving Generals of the Revolution, 
written in the winter of 1791-92, after the defeat of Gen. Arthur 
St Qair by the Indians in the autumn of 1791 

Draft of Washington's Farewell Address, written in the spring of 
1796 

Tabulated statement of Washington's household expenses in 1789 

Washington relics 

Draft of President Lincoln's First Emancipation Proclamation, Sep- 
tember 22, 1862 
After the transfer to the Library of the Van Rensselaer Papers, 

the following documents from that collection were added to the 

number in the safe: 

Map of the Colony of Rensselaerswyck of about 1632 

Patent of the Colony of Rensselaerswyck, 1685 

Commissions in the militia, as justice of the peace and as commis- 
sioner for Indian affairs to various members of the Van Rens- 
selaer family, 1670-1768. 21 documents 

Commissions to Philip Schuyler as major general in the Continental 
Army, 1775, and as surveyor general of the State of New York, 
1781 

Letters of freedom and citizenship of the City of Albany granted 
to Jeremy Van Rensselaer, 1733, and to Stephen Van Rensselaer, 

1763 



REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR I9II 1 9 

Draft of commission to Tuenis Van Der Volgen as deputy ranger 
of the County of Albany, from Jeremiah Van Rensselaer, 1732 

RECORDS AND PAPERS IN THE MANUSCRIPTS ROOM AND OTHER PARTS 

OF THE STATE LIBRARY 

New York colonial manuscripts, 1638-1800. 103 v. Of this 
series, 61 volumes are saved in good or fair condition, 22 are 
fragmentary or in very poor condition, and 20 are entirely gone. 
These volumes contained colonial government papers on a great 
variety of topics, among them being the council minutes for the 
Dutch period, the correspondence for the same period with the 
Dutch West India Company and with other American colonies, 
records of civil suits at law involving conflicting land claims, crim- 
inal trials, petitions, commissions and appointments, proclamations, 
muster rolls of colonial troops and census rolls, all illustrating the 
civil and political history of the colony from its first settlement 
to the time of the American revolution. Aside from the volumes 
of orders, warrants and general entries, the volumes of commis- 
sions, and the council minutes for the English period, the colonial 
manuscripts contained almost all the important papers of the colonial 
government that had been preserved, with the exception of the 
records that relate distinctly to land transactions, which are in the 
office of the Secretary of State. The Dutch part of these manu- 
scripts was contained in volumes 1-19 and 23, which were all 
saved with the exception of volume i (containing contracts, leases, 
wills, powers of attorney, etc., 1638-41), and of this volume we 
have in manuscript a translation by Dr E. B. O'Callaghan. Of 
the English papers, 42 volumes (v. 20-22, 24-29, 34-42, 45, 49-63, 
79-82, 84--87) are in good or fair condition, 22 volumes (v. 44, 
46-48, 70, 74-78, 83, 88-91, 93, 96, 99-103) are fragmentary or 
in very poor condition, and 19 volumes (v. 30-33, 43, 64-69, 71-73, 
92, 94, 95, 97, 98) are entirely lost. Those which were lost relate 
largely to the administrations of Governors Brockholls and Dongan, 
1681-86; Bellomont and Cornbury, 1699-1704; Burnet, Montgom- 
erie. Van Dam, Cosby and Clarke, 1 721-41; Hardy, 1756; and 
Monckton, Colden, Moore, Dunmore and Tryon, 1762-72; and to 
the boundary dispute between New York and Massachusetts, 1785- 
1800. A list of the papers in voltunes i-ioi was printed in 1865-66 
as Calendar of Historical Manuscripts in the Office of the Secretary 
of State, V. I, Dutch, 1630-64; v. 2, English, 1664-76. Of volumes 
102 and 103, which related mainly to the above-mentioned boundary 



20 NEW YORK STATE LIBRARY 

dispute and were largely copies of earlier records bearing on the 
question at issue, there was only a manuscript calendar and this 
was lost. The ordinances and regulations of the government dur- 
ing the Dutch period were printed in 1868; the four volumes of the 
Documentary History of the State of New York and volumes 12- 
14 of the Documents relating to the Colonial History of the State 
of N-ew York contain other documents taken from this series ; and 
large portions of volumes 22-24 of the manuscripts, covering the 
earliest period of the English rule, as well as muster rolls for the 
entire colonial period, were printed in the annual reports of the 
State Historian for 1897 ^ind 1898, though not with desirable 
accuracy. The great mass of the papers in the series, however, has 
never been printed. 

There were also 24 volumes of translations by Francis A. Van 
der Kemp of the records now contained in volumes 1-19 and 23 ; 
these are almost entirely destroyed but as the translations were 
very imperfect, their loss is not serious. In addition to volume i 
already mentioned. Doctor O'Callaghan translated volumes 2-4 and 
a few documents from volumes 5, 16, 22 and 23 ; these translations 
were saved. 

Holland, London and Paris documents, 1611-1782, 80 v. These 
were manuscript copies of official papers procured in 1841-44 from 
the archives of Holland, England and France by John Romeyn 
.Brodhead as agent of the State. The copies were almost entirely 
destroyed but the loss is comparatively unimportant as originals are 
still in existence and the English papers as well as translations of 
the Dutch and French papers were published in full as Documents 
relating to the Colonial History of the State of New York, v. i-io, 
index v. 11, Albany 1853-61. 

New York Council minutes, 1668-1^83. 28 v. All the volumes 
of this series were saved; 14 volumes are in good, 4 volumes in 
fair, and 10 volumes in poor condition. Of the rough drafts of 
council minutes, which in a number of cases supplemented the en- 
grossed minutes by giving entries that the engrossing clerk omitted, 
very little is left. The minutes of the Council acting in its legisla- 
tive capacity are fortunately in print. Journal of the Legislative 
Council of the Colony of New York, idpi-iyy^y 2 v., Albany 1861 ; 
those minutes which were not legislative in character are given in 
abstract in Calendar of Council Minutes, 1668-1783 (History bul- 
letin 6 of the State Library), Albany 1902; more recently the first 
part of the earliest volume of council minutes has been printed by 



REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR IQII 21 

the State Historian as Minutes of the Executive Council of the 
Province of New York — Administration of Francis Lovelace, 
1 668- 1 6/3, 2 V. (index to appear later as volume 3), Albany 191 o. 
Of the minutes after 1686, a set is also founcl in the Public Record 
Office, London. In view of the fact that many of the manuscript 
volumes are in excellent state and that the series has been to so 
large an extent printed, it is fair to say that the loss of historic 
material has been slight. 

General entries, orders, warrants etc., 1664-1712. 10 v. This 
series of records of the action of the governors in cases brought 
before them on appeal, of admiralty cases, of ships' passes, etc., 
ran from the English occupation to 1683, with a few records which 
were of later date. Four volumes were saved in part but the loss 
sustained is severe. The earliest volume of the series was pub- 
lished practically in full as General Entries, v. i, 1664-65 (History 
bulletin 2 of the State Library), Albany 1899. Much of the earlier 
volumes of the series has also been printed in volumes 12-14 of the 
Documents relating to the Colonial History of the State of New 
York and, so far as they fell within the period 1668-73, in the 
illustrative material accompanying the State Historian's recent pub- 
lication of council minutes. 

Court of assizes, i668-y2. 1 v. This volume contained also 
general entries. The part of the volume made up of the court 
record seems to be entirely gone, but fragments of the general en- 
tries are saved. 

Colonial commissions, 1680-1/72. 5 v. Fragments only saved. 
Volume 3 had been received very recently from the Secretary of 
State. This was a series of records of very great value, not in print. 

Colonial laws, 1691-1/25. One hundred seventy-five laws en- 
grossed on parchment received from the office of the Secretary of 
State in 1849, ^"^ listed in the 1850 catalog of the State Library, 
pages 1030-54. These are entirely gone but there are records of 
most of them in the office of the Secretary of State and all were 
printed in Colonial Laws of New York, Albany 1896. 

Bills which failed to become laws, 168 5-1/70. 3 v. Saved in 
fair condition. 

Treasurer's warrants, 1702-76. 6 v. Parts of 4 volumes saved, 
not ill print anywhere. 

Quit rent accounts, 1/22-1806. 18 v. Parts of several journals 
and ledgers saved but all very badly burned. These accounts were 
not in print and were of value principally because they furnished 
a record of the patents by counties. 



22 NEW YORK STATE LIBRARY 

Land patents. The 2 volumes of Dutch patents, known as GG 
and HH, which constitute the very earliest records of the colony 
and run from 1630 to 1664, were both saved and are in very good 
condition. Patents for the period after 1664 are in the office of 
the Secretary of State ; 12 volumes of drafts of land patents, 1680- 
1775, which were in the State Library, were lost except for a few 
fragments. 

Abstracts of land grants, 1664-iyy^. 12 v. Six volumes saved. 
These abstracts are arranged by counties and give data as to the 
date of grant, name of governor, grantee, description and amount 
of quit rent 

Returns of survey, 1683-86. 1 v. This important volume of re- 
turns was saved in fair condition. 

Warrants of survey, etc., ij2i-j6, 7 v. These records included 
warrants of survey, Indian deeds, etc., 1721-32; licenses to purchase 
Indian lands, warrants of survey, etc., 1750-76; warrants to pre- 
pare patents, 1753-75. Three volumes were saved in poor condi- 
tion and fragments of several others. The loss is practically com- 
plete but the substance of the record is in most cases to be found 
in the council minutes and the various land records in the office 
of the Secretary of State. 

Indentures of Palatine children, lyio-ii, i v. The volume was 
lost but the names of the children, parents and those to whom the 
children were apprenticed are printed in Documentary History of 
the State of New York, 3 :566-67, quarto edition. 

Montgomery charter of New York City, 1730. 1 v. In poor 
condition. 

Provincial militia, 1745—60. Thirty-nine rolls purchased in 1906. 
These were all lost. 

Indian traders' bondsy 1765-71. Two volumes of about 400 
bonds. Entirely lost. 

Proceedings regarding the boundary line between Massachusetts 
and Rhode Island, 1741-42. i v. Saved. 

Commissioners at Greenwich, 1743. i v. Minutes of the com- 
missioners appointed to reexamine and determine the controversy 
between Connecticut and the Mohegan Indians. Saved in good 
condition. 

Territorial rights, 1750-70. i v. A collection of evidence vindi- 
cating the rights of New York against the claims of Massachusetts, 
New Hampshire and " the people of the grants who are commonly 
called Vermonters." Saved in good condition. 



REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR I9II 23 

Books of entry of the port of New York, 1^28-66, 10 v. All 
saved in fair condition. 

Manifest books, 1^40-^6. Sixteen volumes and 4 file cases. 
Saved 8 volumes and contents of the file cases, being most of the 
years 1740-62. 

Shipmasters' and marine bonds, 1753-67. 10 v. Entirely lost. 

Marriage bonds, 1752-83 (with memoranda of licenses issued in 
1736-37). 41 V. A number of volumes were saved but all very 
badly burned. These bonds were filed as a condition to the issue 
of marriage licenses by the Secretary of the Colony, the licenses 
themselves being a dispensation from the proclamation of banns 
when it was inconvenient or impossible to comply with the general 
usage. Names of Persons for whom Marriage Licenses were issued 
by the Secretary of the Province of New York, previous to 1784, 
Albany i860, is an index to the bonds in volumes 1-40 and Sup- 
plementary List of Marriage Licenses (History bulletin i of the 
State Library), Albany 1898, similarly indexes volume 41 and 
records of this character in other series. The information given by 
the bond and not given by the index was the town of residence and 
occupation of the f)arties to the marriage and of the bondsmen and 
the names of the bondsmen, of whom the bridegroom was gener- 
ally one. 

WraxaWs abridgment of the records of Indian affairs, 1678-1751, 
I V. As the original 4 folio volumes of records of the Indian com- 
missioners have been lost for many years, this abridgment by 
Peter Wraxall, secretary to Sir William Johnson, was very valuable 
for a study of the relations between the colony of New York and 
the Indians for seventy-five years just before the period of Sir 
William Johnson's greatest activity. A copy of this record was 
made a few years ago for one of the historical students of the 
country who planned to edit and publish it; such publication has 
not yet taken place but the copy is still preserved. 

Sir William Johnson manuscripts, 1733-1808. 26 v. Thirteen 
volumes (v. i, 2, 6, 16-25) are in good or fair condition, 9 volumes 
(v. 3, 4, 8, 10-13, ^S» 26) are fragmentary, and 4 volumes (v. 5, 7, 
9, 14) are entirely lost. The papers in this collection numbered 
6550 and the greater nimiber of them are from the period 1755-74. 
With the exception of those in the last volume, they were nearly 
all public and private papers in the possession of Sir William at 
the time of his death in 1774. Because of the prominent part he 
played in the history of his time as the agent of the colony and of 



24 NEW YORK STATE LIBRARY 

the British government in the management of Indian affairs, these 
letters, official and military reports, and records of public proceed- 
ings were of great public importance. Fortunately a list of them 
was printed recently by the Department, Calendar of the Sir 
William Johnson Manuscripts in the New York State Library, 
Albany 1909. About 300 of the papers were printed in the Docu- 
mentary History of the State of Nezv York, 2:543-1007 and 4:257— 
504 (quarto edition, 2:315-583 and 4:167-312), Albany 1849-51. 
Copies of a large number of these papers have also at various times 
been furnished individuals and societies engaged in historical re- 
search and it will probably be possible to secure copies of the copies 
furnished by us. When Mr Hugh Hastings was State Historian, he 
had copied about a fourth of the more important papers of the 
collection and had them in press at the time of his retirement from 
office. These copies are presumably still in existence in galley or 
page proof. 

Records of the Indian Agency, 1757-59- i v. Prideaux and 
Johnson Orderly Book — Siege of Fort Niagara, 1759, i v. Diary 
of Sir William Johnson, 1759 and 1761, i v. These 3 volumes were 
really a part of the Sir William Johnson manuscripts, though not 
belonging to the 26 volumes of the series so-called. All are entirely 
lost, but the Orderly Book, which was not the original, was copied 
a few years ago and may possibly be replaced from this copy and 
the Diary was printed on pages 394-478 of volume 2 of William 
L. Stone's Life and Times of Sir William Johnson, Bart., Albany 
1865. Stone also printed a few extracts from the Records of the 
Indian Agency. 

Letters of Col, John Bradstreet and Gen. Sir Jeffery Amherst, 
1755-71- I V. Lost. 

Letters of Governor Tryon to Rev. Samuel Buel, and Other 
Papers, 1777-80. i v. Lost. 

Minutes of the Provincial Congress, Provincial Convention, Com- 
mittee of Safety and Council of Safety of the State of New York, 
1775-78. 10 V. Same, original drafts. 6 v. Only fragments of 
these sets were saved but they are printed as volume i of Journals 
of the Provincial Congress, Provincial Convention, Committee of 
Safety and Council of Safety of the State of New York, Albany 
1842. 

Revolutionary papers, 1775-77. 12 v. Only fragments saved; 
they were some of the letters and reports received by the provincial 
government and are printed as volume 2 of the Journals mentioned 
above. 



REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR IQII 25 

Papers laid before the Provincial Congress, lyy^So, i6 v. Only 
fragments saved; these papers comprised credentials of delegates, 
military committee minutes, military returns (2 volumes of which 
are of later date than the provincial government, 1779-80), associa- 
tions, petitions, miscellaneous papers. Selections arranged in chron- 
ologic order are printed as Calendar of Historical Manuscripts re- 
lating to the War of the Revolution, 2 v., Albany 1868. 

Papers relating to the Vermont controversy, 1777-99- ^ v. In 
fair condition. 

Proceedings of the Albany Committee of Correspondence, 1775- 
78. 2 V. Saved, being in the office of the State Historian. 

Minutes of Commissioners for Conspiracies, 1778-81, 2 v. The 
originals are now lost but fortunately they were recently printed 
by the State Historian as Minutes of the Commissioners for De- 
feating Conspiracies in the State of New York, Albany County 
Sessions, 1778-81, 3 v., Albany 1909-10. 

George Clinton papers, 1763-1844, 52 v. These papers of the 
man who was governor of the State, with a single intermission, 
from 1777 to 1804 contained material of great value for a history 
of the State in the Revolution and during the quarter century fol- 
lowing; there were also business papers relating to lands through- 
out the parts of the State then settled in which various members 
of the Clinton family were interested. This collection suffered 
very severely and out of the entire number of volumes only 10 
were saved in fair condition; of a few other volumes we have 
fragments. With exceptions, the papers for 1775^1 (volumes 
1-14) were printed by the State Historian as volumes 1-7, and 
about one-fifth of the papers for 1782-85 (volumes 15-20) as 
volume 8 of the Public Papers of George Clinton, Albany 1899- 
1904. 

Council of Appointment, minutes 1777-86. i v. Entirely gone. 
The military appointments to the close of the Revolution are en- 
tered under the organizations to which the officers were appointed 
in Documents relating to the Colonial History of the State of New 
York, V. 15 (State Archives, v. i), Albany 1887. Of the files of 
the Council, 1 777-1 821, consisting of about 10,000 papers, some 
1000 were saved but many of these are badly burned. 

Manuscripts of the Colony and State of New York in the Revolu- 
tionary War, 1 77 5-1800. 52 V. in 55. These papers were trans- 
ferred to the State Library from the office of the State Comptroller 
in 1910. They formed the basis of New York in the Revolution as 



26 NEW YORK STATE LIBRARY 

Colony and State, Albany 1897, 2d ed. 1898, supplement 1901, and 
with other manuscripts in the State Library constituted practically 
all the important series of records in the possession of the State 
relative to the service of her inhabitants in the Revolution. About 
two-fifths of the papers were saved in good condition but the card 
index of names was entirely lost. 

Letter hook of Henry Glen, Deputy Commissary General, 1776- 
80. I V. Badly burned. 

Beverly Robinson estate, 1777-79* i v. Accounts of sales of 
personal property belonging to Robinson and other tories. The 
volume is lost. 

Certificates of treasurer, 10 v. These certificates were for the 
most part for military service in the Revolutionary War and there- 
fore furnish the names of the officers and men so serving. The 
arrangement follows the pay rolls ; the names were rearranged and 
printed as an "Alphabetical Roster of the State Troops " in Docu- 
ments relating to the Colonial History of the State of New York, 
V. 15 {State Archives, v. i), Albany 1887. The volumes were 
saved but are badly burned. 

Audited accounts, 1783-94. 2 v. Relate largely to the accounts 
for which the Certificates mentioned above were issued. Saved in 
fair condition. 

Military balloting book, 1790-94. i v. Very badly burned. This 
book was printed as Balloting Book and other Documents relating 
to Military Bounty Lands in the State of New York, Albany 1825. 

Onondaga commissioners' minutes, 1798-1802. 2 v. folio and 
19 V. 16°. These were the records of the commissioners appointed 
under act of March 24, 1797 to settle disputes concerning land 
titles in the military tract in central New York. The folio volumes 
are saved in fair condition though rather badly burned at the 
edges; the smaller volumes are lost. 

Assembly papers, 1777-1831. 43 v. These papers were selected 
in 1 83 1 from the documents on file in the Assembly and were 
arranged in 13 volumes called miscellaneous, 11 relating to Revolu- 
tionary soldiers and claims, 4 to forfeited estates, 3 to estates of 
deceased persons, 3 of executive messages and correspondence, 2 
of attorney generals' reports, 2 of surveyor generals' reports, 
I of comptrollers' reports, 2 on Indian affairs, i on colleges and 
schools, and i on corporations (principally relating to New York 
City matters). Of this series 36 volumes have been saved, many of 



REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR I9II 27 

them in excellent condition; the volumes lost include 5 of miscel- 
laneous papers, i Revolutionary soldiers and claims, and i execu- 
tive messages and correspondence. 

Legislative papers, 1780-1803, 13 v. and index. These were 
papers similar to the above but taken from the Senate files. Four 
volumes are in fair condition and there are fragments of two 
others. 

Legislative papers, 1786-1910, Unbound papers kept in file boxes 
or in packages. There were very few papers earlier than 1800; 
through 1 83 1 they consisted of Assembly papers which were not 
considered valuable enough to be included in the bound series and 
related to the division of towns and counties, the incorporation of 
cities and villages, and of turnpike and bridge companies, the con- 
struction of canals, the erection of dams and wharves, the encour- 
agement of manufactories, reports in relation to militia and military 
stores, the practice of medicine, and miscellaneous petitions; after 
1 83 1 they included also the classes of papers found in the bound 
volumes and were correspondingly numerous. For the later years 
they contained practically nothing but the original bills introduced. 
Out of some 100,000 papers, perhaps 2000 were saved but even 
these are badly burned. 

Election returns, 1777-1Q05. Ten thousand papers unbound. 
About 1000 saved, many badly burned. 

Queens county court of sessions, 1795. i bundle. Saved. 

Original minutes of the land office, 1785-Q8, i v. Badly burned. 
The engrossed minutes are in the office of the Secretary of State. 

State census returns, for j8oi, 1807, 18 14, 1821 and 1850-1905, 
750 V. Portions of the returns for 1801, 1814 and 1821 were saved; 
all the other returns, which were not in the manuscripts room but 
on one of the upper floors of the Library, were completely destroyed. 

Letters on Indian affairs, 178 5-1825, i v. This volume con- 
tained also certain journals of Samuel Kirkland, missionary to the 
Indians in central New York. Lost. 

Indian treaties. Seven file boxes of original parchments. Most 
of these dated from 1788 to 1822 though there were a few for the 
colonial period. All are lost. 

D. D, Tompkins papers 1795-18 45, 36 v. The 15 volumes of 
copies of letters received, letters sent, military orders, speeches etc. 
are entirely lost. Something over half of these volumes were 
printed by the State Historian as Public Papers of Daniel D, Tomp- 
kins, Governor of New York, 1807-17, 3 v., Albany 1898-1902. 



28 NEW YORK STATE LIBRARY 

Of the 4000 original papers (letters received, drafts of letters sent, 
accounts) more recently mounted and bound in 21 volumes, about 
1000 papers are saved but many of them are badly burned. 

Records of the War of 18 12. 25 v. These papers were trans- 
ferred to the State Library from the office of the State Comptroller 
in 1910. The bulk of the collection consists of accounts of the 
governor, paymasters and commissaries during the war, but there 
are also papers relating to roads and bridges, field artillery, fortifica- 
tions on the northern and western frontiers and in New York 
harbor, for the last decade of the i8th century; arsenals and mil- 
itary stores, 1795-1821; the Council of Appointment, 1807-1817; 
accounts with the United States, 1 816-1826; Indians (accounts, 
treaties etc.), 1783-1816; payments to Americai; prisoners of war 
and Niagara sufferers ; and a number of enlistment papers of men 
who served in the corps of sea fencibles. The volumes were at 
the time of the fire kept in a room off the north gallery of the 
main reading room and all were saved. 

Tax lists of 1814. I V. In good condition. 

Common school returns, 1821-22. i v. Saved in good condition. 

Papers of Adjutant General Fuller, 1823-24, One bundle. In 
fair condition. 

Treasurers' Account Books, 1826-94, Sixty-nine ledgers and a 
number of day books and accounts with banks. This set of records 
of recent date was saved. 

Meteorological observations, 1826-50 and 1856-57. 36 v. Saved 
25 out of 27 volumes of the quarto series, and 5 out of 9 of the 
folio series. These observations were the basis for Results of a 
Series of Meteorological Observations at Sundry Academies in the 
State of New York, from 1826 to 1850 inclusive, compiled by Frank- 
lin B. Hough, Albany 1855. 

Dearborn's mission from Massachusetts to the Senecas and Tus- 
caroras, 1838-39. 3 v. This journal and account of treaties for 
the sale of lands and for the emigration of the Indians west of the 
Mississippi was lost but as it was copied a few years ago for a 
historical society it will be possible to replace it. 

Constitutional convention of 1846. Four volumes of journals and 
one volume of documents. Very badly burned. 

Putnam continental artillery company, Albany, 1854-59. i v. 
Saved in good condition. 

Fort Jackson guard book (Confederate), 1861. i v. Saved. 

Albany mayor's court, minutes, 1736-37. i v. Saved. 



REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR I9II 29 

Albany Mechanics Society, 1786-1826. i v. In good condition. 
Society of Associated Teachers of New York, minutes, 1794- 

1807. I V. In fair condition. 

Albany Philharmonic Society, 1873-76, i v. In fair condition. 

Schenectady retailers' applications for licenses to sell liquors and 
wines, etc. i v. Saved. 

Society for the Propagation of the Gospel in Foreign Parts, 
extracts from correspondence, with the missionaries. T. Poyer, 
S. Seabury and others, relating to Long Island, 1704-79. Saved 
in fair condition. 

Frontiers and miscellaneous, 1794, Saved in very good condition. 

South Carolina Navy Board minutes, 1776-80. 2 v. Saved in 
good condition. 

South Carolina naval pay book,. 1778-79. i v. Saved in good 
condition. 

John P. Gaines papers. Several bundles of papers from the mid- 
dle of the nineteenth century, a part of them dating from the period 
when Gaines was governor of the state of Oregon. Many of them 
saved and in fair condition. 

Manuscripts miscellaneous. 13 v. This is a distinct collection 
with this title. The contents of the first 4 and the 12th volumes 
are very miscellaneous and include an inventory of sundries pro- 
vided for President Washington in 1790, a list of articles consumed 
in the family of the President in the same year, and what was 
possibly an annual budget of the Washington family. Volume 5 
contained letters and papers of various members of the Livingston 
family, chiefly correspondence with Storke and Gainsborough, 
London merchants, 1733-38. Volume 6 comprised Boston and 
Philadelphia merchants' letters, 1733-38. Volumes 7 and 8 were 
made up of British colonial army papers and accounts, 1752-1807. 
Volumes 9 and 10 were autograph letters of American officials and 
authors. Volume 11 contained some French manuscripts, 1567- 

1808. Volume 13 contained the papers of Sir Edmund Warcupp 
relating to the Popish plot. All of these volumes were saved and 
are in fair condition. 

Miscellaneous Hies, 1798-18 51. 3 v. Among the more important 
papers in this series were : papers relating to weights and measures, 
executive proclamations against Canadian sympathizers, anti-rent 
papers, whaling companies on the Hudson river, papers relating to 
the Capitol and the transfer of records to Albany in 1798, field 
book of the division line of Schoharie and Delaware counties. New 



30 NEW YORK STATE LIBRARY 

York- Vermont boundary established in 1814, Holland Land Com- 
pany papers, etc. The volumes are entirely lost. 

Usselincx manuscripts, 1606-46. 3 v. Copies of papers of Wil- 
lem Usselincx, an exile from Belgium who was preeminent among 
the founders of the Dutch East and West India Companies. The 
originals of these copies are presumably still in existence. Two 
volumes were saved though rather badly burned. 

French papers. Eighty documents copied for the New York 
State Library in 1888 from the Bibliotheque Nationale and the 
Archives Nationales at Paris. They relate niainly to dTberville's 
voyages to the mouth of the Mississippi and to the War of the 
Revolution. A very fully annotated list was published as Descrip- 
tive List of French Manuscripts (History bulletin 5 of the State 
Library), Albany 1902. All these papers were lost. 

Rensselaerswyck manuscripts, 16 j 4-18 /O. This collection in- 
cluded some 200 volumes of ledger and journal accounts, 1000 
Dutch letters, 3000 leases, 500 maps and surveys, and 25,000 mis- 
cellaneous manuscripts, embracing commissions, land patents, con- 
tracts, deeds, poll lists, tax lists, colonial muster rolls, and other 
papers of a public or semipublic character relating to the territory 
covered by the former Manor of Rensselaerswyck. The manu- 
cripts saved include, besides those already mentioned as being in 
the safe in the Commissioner's office, nearly all the early Dutch 
account books, some 50 later account books, Anthony de Hooges's 
merriorandum book, 1643-48, the court record of 1648-52, the 
letter book of Jeremias van Rensselaer of 1660-74, records of the 
Tivoli Manufacturing Company, 1836-40, a few letters and muster 
rolls and about 1000 leases. 

Van Rensselaer Bowier manuscripts, 1621-16^6. Manuscript and 
typewritten copies of the Dutch text of the letters of Kiliaen van 
Rensselaer and other papers relating to the colony of Rensselaers- 
wyck which were obtained from Holland and published in trans- 
lation under the above title by the State Library in 1908. These 
copies were saved in good condition. 

Van Rensselaer Bowier manuscripts, 1574-1795. Typewritten 
copies of another collection of Dutch manuscripts relating to the 
van Rensselaer and van Wely families in Holland and to the 
colony of. Rensselaerswyck, which was obtained from Howard 
Townsend, Esq., in 1908 and returned to Jonkheer Marten van 
Rensselaer Bowier at Amsterdam in 1909. These papers have not 
been published ; the copies were saved in good condition. 



REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR I9II 3I 

Stevens papers. About 250 v. This collection included papers 
of Ethan Allen, Ira Allen, Heman Allen and Governors Jenison 
and Tichenor of Vermont, rolls and accounts of regulars and volun- 
teers and Vermont militia in the War of 1812, Burlington custom- 
house papers, papers relating to the Canadian rebellion of 1839-40, 
etc., but the great majority of the papers were of a private or 
business nature. About 100 volumes were saved, many of them in 
very good condition. 

Sermons in Dutch and Latin of Rev, Eilardus Westerlo, 9 v. 
All lost. 

Registers of visitors to the Capitol, from 1883. 9 v. Most of 
them saved. 

Paper money. Two scrapbook volumes, 1 770-1864. Saved in 
fair condition. 

DUTCH RECORDS 
The 22 manuscript volumes of Dutch records which the Library 
is to publish under authority of chapter 177 of the Laws of 1910 
were all saved except volume i of the register of the provincial 
secretary, which together with a complete typewritten copy and a 
translation which the archivist had prepared before the fire were 
destroyed on his desk in the manuscripts room. Of the 21 volumes 
that were saved 15 volumes, including 2 volumes of register of the 
provincial secretary, i volume of council minutes, S volumes of 
correspondence, i volume of ordinances, i volume of Curasao 
papers, 2 volumes of Delaware papers, i volume of records of the 
administration of Governor Colve and 2 volumes of land patents, 
known as GG and HH, escaped without serious damage to the 
writing of the documents. The remaining six volumes, which con- 
sist of council minutes, were badly burned at the top and in spite 
of the care that has been taken to preserve the charred edges of 
the manuscripts it appears that one or more lines are wanting at 
the top of every one of the several thousand pages of which these 
volumes are composed. Slight as this damage may seem in com- 
parison to the total destruction of the first volume of the register 
of the provincial secretary, it involves a net loss of historical ma- 
terial which is scarcely less important than that of the register. 
The reason for this is that since the loss of van der Kemp's 
translations there is practically nothing, either in the way of copies 
or translations, from which the missing parts in the minutes can 
be supplied, whereas in the case of the register the substance of 



32 NEW YORK STATE LIBRARY 

the documents is preserved in a manuscript translation by Dr E. B. 
O'Callaghan, which was saved in fairly good condition. Aside 
from the fact that for purposes of verification a mere translation 
can never take the place of the original record, the principal loss 
in connection with the register is that of the hundreds of autograph 
signatures of early colonists which were affixed to the legal instru- 
ments recorded in the volume and which formed one of its most 
conspicuous features of interest. 

The time of the archivist for some months after the fire was 
necessarily taken up with the work of manuscript restoration, and 
to this extent the active work of translation of Dutch records has 
been in abeyance. Even after it was possible to resume this work, 
it was found to be seriously hampered by the lack of a proper 
bibliographical and historical reference equipment, such as formerly 
existed in the State Library. As soon as appropriations were avail- 
able, however, the Library took steps to acquire the books of first 
importance for this work and the translation is now proceeding 
as fast as possible under the conditions. 

REORGANIZATION 

TEMPORARY QUARTERS 

Almost immediately after the fire the Library secured the use 
of temporary quarters in different parts of the city. The Division 
of Educational Extension and the Library School are now located 
in the Guild House of All Saints Cathedral. The work of caring 
for the recovered manuscripts is being done at the Catholic Union, 
at which building also the sorting of duplicates is carried on. Each 
of these enterprises will be the work of many months. The medical 
librarian is located in a room on the third floor of the building at 
240 Washington avenue, occupied by the State Board of Charities, 
where the current medical journals are made available to physicians. 
Two members of the library staff are still at the State Normal 
College. Thousands of duplicates are still stored in the attic of the 
Senate chamber. The administrative, buying and cataloging de- 
partments of the Library, with the larger part of its staff, occupy 
the building at 162 State street. These scattered quarters will be 
occupied until the new building is ready, and its near completion 
with such substantial promise of satisfactory accommodations, does 
much to reconcile us to the present serious loss of administrative 
efficiency. 



REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR I9II 33 

MANUSCRIPT RESTORATION 

These temporary quarters secured, the work of restoration was 
begun. The manuscript salvage was given first attention. What 
was saved had been before the fire mostly mounted on heavy sheets 
with wide margins and bound into volumes of varying sizes. The 
covers and edges of these were without exception charred and 
blackened, and in nearly every case the volume was more or less 
water-soaked. The first step was to remove all covers. Each 
volume was then taken apart leaf by leaf, and each sheet was laid 
between print paper for drying. After twenty-four hours every 
leaf was again handled and placed between heavy blotting paper; 
after twenty- four hours here, each leaf was again removed to a 
second blotting paper. At all of these stages pressure was applied 
to facilitate the drying and keep the documents from wrinkling. 

With the first few volumes handled, each leaf was put into a 
bath of clear water and a camel's-hair brush applied to remove 
dirt. It was soon found that this took too much time to apply to 
all manuscripts and that they would mold and mildew if faster 
progre§s was not made. The bath was therefore omitted with 
the greater part of the manuscripts treated, and the camel's-hair 
brush was applied dry, and such dirt as could be removed was taken 
off in this way. 

When each leaf had thus passed through these three drying proc- 
esses, those belonging to the same volume were collected and care- 
fully tied up in boxes or separate packages to wait until all the 
manuscripts were thus treated. The manuscripts were first saved 
from fire and water. The race through the ensuing two weeks to 
save them from mold and mildew was quite as keen and hard. 

When all were dried, the manuscripts were arranged in volumes, 
a slow matter, as but one or two persons were enough acquainted 
with them to be able to tell just which documents belonged together. 
The rarest pieces will in time be mended, nearly all will be covered 
with crepeline, all will be mounted on fresh paper and carefully 
bound into new volumes. The archivist estimates that this work 
will keep a dozen or fifteen people busy for about a year. 

This work, as described above, was initiated under the direction 
of Mr William Berwick, expert in manuscript restoration, who 
came to us for ten days from the Library of Congress. Mr Ber- 
wick not only personally organized our work, but has given the 
archivist and certain members of our staflf explicit directions as to 
its prosecution to completion. 



34 NEW YORK STATE LIBRARY 

The accompanying photographs taken by Mr Berwick will per- 
haps serve to make more vivid the work described just above. 

INTERNAL REORGANIZATION 
Some faint notion may be had of the tangle into which the 

official records and business affairs of the Library were plunged 
when it is recalled that all records of outstanding orders were 
destroyed, that there was no way of knowing for how many thou- 
sands of dollars worth of books the Library was obligated or how 
many and what books had been received and not paid for at the 
time of the fire. Hundreds of then unknown " continuation " 
orders were cut off in midsets and even after agents had furnished 
lists of these orders supposedly complete, it was hard to decide 
wisely which to cancel or continue. These decisions were particu- 
larly hard because they must be made almost at once and it was 
impossible to decide just what the scope of the Library would be 
or upon what scale of expenditure it would be restored. The burn- 
ing of all numbers for the first three months of the year 191 1 of 
more than 3000 current periodicals broke 3000 volumes, many of 
them difficult and impossible to restore. All mailing and exchange 
lists showing what State publications were sent to and received 
from hundreds of institutions in all parts of the world were likewise 
burned and restored only by laborious correspondence. All acces- 
sion records, the official shelf list, and practically all the public 
author catalog were destroyed. Much of the classed subject cat- 
alog, however, was saved and will be of considerable use in order- 
ing new books. These incidents are cited merely as typical of 
hundreds which presented themselves during the months immedi- 
ately following the fire and which at once emphasized the necessity 
for formulating a new plan of internal library organization which 
should be comprehensive enough to provide properly for the or- 
ganization of a great library, yet which might be curtailed at certain 
points if it should later appear that any curtailment in plan were 
necessary. 

With the Library thus entirely swept away, with the card catalog 
destroyed or burned beyond further use, with all records and 
correspondence wiped out, the situation was much like that which 
would confront a new library about to organize. Calling for 
immediate consideration and decision were such questions as : What 
system of classification shall be used? What form of catalog shall 
be constructed? Shall an accession book be used? What form 
of shelf list is desirable? What is the best record for current 




Some badly burned manuscript treasures. On the top of the truck 
are some single sheets standing against a sheet of blotting paper ; below 
are some manuscript volumes after covers had been removed, showing 
burned edges. 



The same manuscripts drying leaf by leaf between heavy blotting 
papers. The burned volume which is to be next treated lies on the bench. 



•* *fl 

1* *m 
■ ** a 



• •• 



• _• 






• • 



REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR I9II 35 

periodicals? How shall records be duplicated or differentiated 
among the various special libraries which in the future more even 
than in the past will probably as a group make up the State Library ? 

Naturally the factors affecting the decision of these questions 
were varied, involving the purpose and scope of the new Library, 
its various lines of coordinate work, such as the Library School 
and the Division of Educational Extension, the relation of all 
its activities to library and educational endeavor throughout the 
State. These were all questions which must be decided by the 
Library itself. No expression of opinion would be made, no defini- 
tion of scope or purpose would be promulgated by the Legislature, 
and the State law merely said in general terms that the purpose 
of the act of 1818 *' was to establish a public library for the use 
of the government and of the people of the State." Immediately 
after the fire, at the time when these questions must be decided, 
though the Legislature was in session it had not and could not for 
some weeks give any definite indication as to what appropriations 
might seem to it reasonable and proper for the work of restoration 
and reorganization. The Library authorities, however, assumed, 
and as the event proved with ample warrant, that the State wished 
to build up a new Library which should match the preeminence of 
the Empire State among state libraries and which should take again 
its former rank with reference libraries in the subjects which it 
should mark off as its own scope and province. Decision in these 
fundamental questions of reorganization was of course considerably 
helped by the knowledge and the fact that in the Education Build- 
ing, at the time of the fire three-fourths complete, were provided 
ample quarters for the State Library which had been planned upon 
the various lines of work carried on in its former quarters in the 
Capitol. It was assumed, therefore, that none of this work \yould 
be given up and that ample appropriations would be made by the 
Legislature to enable the State Library to take its former place not 
only as the official head of the library system of the State but 
among the great libraries of the land. 

A program for the technical reorganization of such a library is 
necessarily complex, far more minute and intricate than would 
suffice for smaller libraries. As described here it is not presented 
as a whole, nor are any of its features urged, as ideal provisions 
for any other libraries of similar size and kindred purpose. Among 
state libraries there is almost no other which combines under one 
administration in the same centralized way so many of the library 
activities of the state. The very extent and interrelations of the 
2 



36 NEW YORK STATE LIBRARY 

various other lines of educational and library work which are carried 
on by the New York State Library are in many cases justification 
and reason for the adoption of certain features of administration 
and certain forms of record which are not universally appropriate. 

ORDER AND ACCESSION WORK 
A temporary catalog. Several thousand books saved from the 
fire, all thoroughly wet, and most of them partially burned, called 
for first and immediate attention. They must be dried and pre- 
pared for binding; but as the bindery was burned and a new one 
to be found or equipped, it was necessary to make a record by 
author and title of all books saved from the fire which after ex- 
amination should prove to be fit for binding and an ultimate place 
in the new Library. Obviously at such a time full and minute 
cataloging could not be thought of, and yet if possible a record was 
desirable which should take a permanent place in the economy of 
the Library and perhaps for some years form a satisfactory part 
of its catalog equipment. Gifts began to pour in at once; books 
were returned which were in the hands of borrowers ; within a few 
weeks purchases began to be made, at first the most necessary 
bibliographic equipment, then for the Library School and the Divi- 
sion of Educational Extension, which resumed work with very little 
interruption. Records must be kept of all these accessions to avoid 
duplication and to be able to tell at a moment's notice whether 
such a book was on hand. To meet the need for a simple yet ade- 
quate catalog a consolidated index was devised which has come 
to be known through the staff as the *' C. L" The following 
description of it will give the best notion as to the various problems 
which pressed for consideration almost at once in the reorganization 
of the internal library economy. 

" Consolidated index." The consolidated index contains a rec- 
ord by author and occasionally by subject or title of all books in 
the Library, or of those ordered or begged, with certain other rec- 
ords likely to be helpful in the rebuilding of the State Library. 
More specifically, it will list: 

1 All books saved from the old Library, either by salvage or 
returned by readers, which are wanted in the new Library. 

2 Orders outstanding. For all books ordered there will be made 
an order card and a duplicate (carbon slip where possible). The 
duplicate card is filed into consolidated index, while order card 
proper is kept in order index until book is received and accessioned, 



REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR I9II 37 

when it is filed into consolidated index in place of the duplicate 
which is then used in ordering Library of Congress cards. 

3 Orders received (as explained in 2). 

4 Outstanding requests for gifts. Two cards are filed (as with 
orders), one, the original, into " begging " file, kept by gift clerk to 
follow up, the duplicate into consolidated index. When request for 
gift is not successful, begging slip is changed to an order card or 
facts (not received) noted and card filed in want list. 

5 Requested gifts received. When gifts are received in response 
to request, date of receipt is noted and the begging slip is transferred 
from " begging " file to consolidated index, in one of two ways ; 
(a) if book is to be accessioned, book and slip are passed to acces- 
sion clerk and routine is same as for purchase; (b) if not acces- 
sioned (as with certain pamphlets or parts of volumes or sets), 
slip is immediately filed into consolidated index. 

6 Unsolicited gifts. These are first examined as to their desir- 
ability. If wanted by the Library, a card is made out for all gifts 
of four or more pages and filed into consolidated index. 

7 Books bid on at auction. For all books on which bid is suc- 
cessful, two cards are made out as in purchase routine. 

8 Reference cards to all titles on serials list. 

9 Reference cards to all titles on annuals list. (In New York 
State Library serials are distinguished from annuals. Purchased 
annuals go on serials check list.) 

10 Continuations. If these are issued in few volumes, so that 
order card will take -clearly and easily all required information, 
follow routine in (2) except that original card remains in order 
index until set is completed. In case of long and complicated sets, 
place reference card in consolidated index and keep record of re- 
ceipt of continuation on sheets in continuations list. On completion, 
discard sheet into discard file and note fact on card in consolidated 
index. 

Accession book. In recent years many libraries have done 
away with this record; and in reorganization the question at once 
arose: Shall the accession book be retained in the State Library? 
After discussion by the heads of the various sections (a sort of 
library council which considered and settled all matters of this sort 
at this time) the various alternative or substitute plans were dis- 
cussed. It became clear ( i ) that there are some items in the stand- 
ard printed forms for accession books that seem to be unnecessary 
in any library; (2) that in many small libraries so few of these 



38 NEW YORK STATE LIBRARY 

items are a necessary part of its records that the accession book 
may well be discontinued and the essential items incorporated into 
another record or distributed over two or three records, such as 
the shelf list, the card catalog or the bill book; (3) that the question 
is not so small in a large library which is in effect a group of special 
libraries and which is intimately related both in its work and its 
internal library machinery to the library extension work of the 
State and to the Library School. It was therefore decided to 
retain the accession book but to use instead of, as formerly, a 
specially printed form with a dozen or more items of information, 
the standard condensed accession book printed by the Library 
Bureau, and of the items therein provided to omit size, place, minor 
paging, and binding information. A minor consideration which 
determined the retention of the accession book was that certain 
necessary statistics as to gross number of volumes added, volumes 
added during stated periods, separate figures for gifts, etc. were 
much easier procured from an accession book than from any sub- 
stitute anywhere offered. It was believed, moreover, and in practice 
has so worked out, that other important steps in connection with 
the routine of getting books into the Library, the keeping out 
duplicates, maintaining fundamental and necessary business records, 
etc. might be grouped around the process of accessioning in such 
a way as not only to make it a more important step than formerly 
but to simplify the order routine. 

Because the accession clerk must examine the book carefully to 
get facts for the accession record, she is made responsible for: 
( I ) detecting such imperfections as may be discovered from a rough 
collation; (2) determining whether the book received is the exact 
book ordered; (3) preventing the accessioning or marking in any 
way of books ordered in duplicate because of an error in the au- 
thor's name or in the title or imprint. 

In other words, without very appreciably increasing the work 
of accessioning, she does a large share of the work that would be 
done by a receiving clerk in a library which kept its accession record 
in some other department. 

In addition, the accession clerk is expected to see that books are 
assigned to the proper department among the five in the Library 
which have special bookplates and records, that is, main library. 
Library School, law, document collection, and traveling library. 
In the case of a purchase or gift en bloc, the work of eliminating 
the duplicates is done by the accession clerk. 



REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR I9I I 39 

CLASSIFICATION 

Before the fire the Library used the Decimal classification. At 
the time this system was adopted (nearly twenty-^five years ago) 
there was no other serious competitor. Within recent years the 
Expansive classification and the Library of Congress classification 
have appeared. These three systems then were considered by the 
New York State Library. 

The Expansive classification is incomplete; it has been so for 
years and seems to be making but little progress toward completion. 
It does not seem to have been adopted by many large reference 
libraries within the past few years. For these reasons it was passed 
over. 

As to the Library of Congress classification, many good points 
were conceded: among them its excellent grouping, its possibilities 
for easy interpolation, its minuteness, the fact that expert and 
competent people are constantly engaged in extending and improv- 
ing it and its recent adoption by several important college and 
reference libraries. On the other hand it is not complete, it exists 
in print in confessedly tentative form, and could not therefore be 
adopted with any assurance as to the ultimate integrity of its present 
schedules. 

It seemed, too, that the Decimal classification when intelligently 
used will result in shorter class marks. It is being actively revised, 
a new and considerably enlarged edition appearing just at the time 
of the fire. It has a considerable and growing international use 
and it is the only system of classification which may be properly 
termed universally current in this country. Any system universally 
current, or nearly so, or tending to become so, is for these very 
reasons much the most serviceable system. The Decimal classifica- 
tion is undoubtedly in this position and has in its favor so weighty 
a presumption of use and experience that any competing system 
must show a marked perfection in detail to make a stronger case. 
Then, too, aside from two or three of the very largest libraries in 
New York State, nearly all important collections are classified by 
the Decimal system. All printed bulletins of the State Library now 
distributed in hundreds, of institutions all over the world, the 
A. L. A. catalog, prepared at this Library, the instruction in our 
Library School for twenty-five years and the resulting usage in 
hundreds of libraries in all parts of the country, seem to constitute 
controlling reasons for the retention of this system. Even in 
its latest edition there were at once apparent many sections which 



40 NEW YORK STATE LIBRARY 

were not detailed enough for our purpose, but through an under- 
standing with its editors, that any extension or amplification which 
should be approved by Mr W. S. Biscoe, the head of our catalog- 
ing and classification, would be incorporated in the next edition of 
the Decimal classification we were thus enabled to make our exten- 
sions with the certainty that they would become a part of the 
official schedules. 

CATALOGING 

Before the fire the principal public card catalog was a classed 
catalog, its arrangement and classification based upon the Decimal 
classification used by the Library. It had been twenty-two years 
in making and was one of relatively few card catalogs of this sort 
in the country, as it was perhaps the largest. Since this catalog 
was begun in 1889 the tendency has been distinctly away from the 
classed catalog and toward the dictionary catalog. A great classed 
catalog such as the one destroyed in the fire is a wonderfully effec- 
tive instrument for research, reference work and investigation, 
particularly so in the hands of a staff highly trained and expert in 
the knowledge and use of the Decimal classification. There are 
many ways in which even the best dictionary catalog can never 
wholly fill the place of a good classed catalog. The trend in the 
other direction, however, has been and still is so decisive, the neces- 
sity for emphasizing, in the Library School, instruction in dictionary 
and not classed cataloging, and the desirability of having the prin- 
cipal catalog of the State Library not only in line with the best 
modem cataloging practice but thoroughly illustrative of the instruc- 
tion given in the Library School — all these operated as potent 
reasons for deciding upon a dictionary catalog. 

The State Library is in effect a group of special libraries occupy- 
ing five separate reading rooms, one of which is further divided into 
three alcoves devoted to separate and important subjects. The Li- 
brary School, too, maintains separate collections of bibliography, 
the Division of Educational Extension has an auxiliary collection 
which will number again, as it did before the fire, probably 100,000 
volumes. While the desirability of making a catalog which shall 
contain cards for the books in all these collections is apparent, yet 
it becomes necessary to equip these special libraries with separate 
catalogs, most of which will duplicate cards in the general catalog 
but which in many cases will contain supplementary and independ- 
ent matter. In addition to these public catalogs there must be 
created a considerable apparatus of official catalogs and records. 



REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR I9II 4I 

This entire cataloging equipment is briefly described below. The 
program is an ambitious one. It is formulated with the full knowl- 
edge that it can not in its entirety keep pace with the large pur- 
chases of books which seem, assured within the next few years. 
Probably the State Library will be in arrears in full classification 
and cataloging for a quarter of a century. Short cuts and modifica- 
tions of routine must be adopted as temporary expedients, yet the 
following program will serve as an ideal toward which, as time 
and available help will permit, the Library will proceed. 

NEW YORK STATE LIBRARY CATALOGS 

Public catalogs 

General dictionary catalog; in the public catalog room 

This catalog includes author and subject cards (with many added 
entries) for all books in the general library, including: 

The collection in library economy (010-029) shelved in the 
Library School 

Medical library (610-619) 

Law library — author and subject cards for all law books ex- 
cept state and federal reports and statutes, codes, compila- 
tions, tables of cases and citations, indexes to laws, digests 

In cataloging bar association reports it is believed that a 
reference card from the name of each bar association to full 
cataloging in the law library catalog will suffice. The law 
library notes its subject headings on cards for textbooks and 
trials only, it being assumed that the general catalog does 
not include subject cards for other material, or, if it does, 
that the subject headings will be obvious as in the case of 
legal periodicals, law dictionaries and the proceedings and 
debates of constitutional conventions. 

Serials — a reference card for each title and subject of each 
periodical referring to the serials catalog and certain full 
entry cards; for details see below, under Special catalogs: 
serials 

Government documents. Includes printed reference cards only, 
referring from the names of countries, states or cities to 
the official checklist kept in the documents room. These 
cards to file immediately after the guide cards for countries, 
states and cities, and to refer to the collected sets of their 
documents. All government documents which are classified 
into the general library are fully cataloged 



42 NEW YORK STATE LIBRARY 

Traveling library books — author cards for all books which are 
not already in the general library 

This catalog excludes: 

Manuscripts, with a very few exceptions, as in genealogy. A 

separate card catalog of manuscripts and broadsides is kept 

in the manuscripts section 
Books for the blind. A separate card catalog of these is kept 

in the library for the blind 
Library School class work collection. A separate card catalog 

is kept in the Library School 

Special catalogs 

Serials : in the public catalog room. On specially ruled sheets 
(9" X iij^'') ; current serials to be added when bound; back 
numbers of incomplete sets are entered unbound. Editor 
cards, filed in the general catalog, are made for prominent 
names if on the title page or cover of a periodical. Complete 
sets of discontinued serials and American serials discontinued 
before 1830, even if incomplete, to be entered on serials sheet 
with full imprint cards in the general catalog 
Dictionary or author catalogs for various collections are kept 

in different rooms or sections of the Library : 
a Law, in the law library 

See under general dictionary catalog — Law, for informa- 
tion as to what law cards are also in that catalog. 
b Medicine, in the medical library 

Dictionary catalog: full entries put in the general catalog. 
Contains many temporary cards for which no entries are 
found in the general catalog. 
c Traveling libraries, in the Educational Extension Division 

Dictionary catalog: simple author and subject cards with 
title cards for fiction and essays. Contains subject and title 
cards, not included in the general catalog, for traveling 
library books. 

Author cards only for all traveling library books are filed 
in the general dictionary catalog. 
d Books for the blind, in the library for the blind 

An author catalog: not duplicated in the general catalog. 
Contains also subject cards for biography and some title 
cards. Duplicate author cards are filed in the official univer- 
sal catalog. 



REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR I9II 43 

e Manuscripts and broadsides : in the manuscripts section 

Author catalog: contains usually one card only for each 
manuscript. This is occasionally a title card; or a subject 
card, as in the case of an anonymous biography. Some sec- 
ondary entries will be made. 

/ Library School class work collection, in the Library School 
Author catalog: not put in the general catalog. Contains 
an author card for each book in the collection, and an addi- 
tional title card for works published anonymously, when the 
author is known. 
g Library economy collection, in the Library School 

Dictionary catalog: fully duplicated in the general catalog 
except certain cards for minor material relating to libraries, 
not put in the general catalog (e. g. leaflets, clippings, blanks, 
pictures of library buildings, etc.). 
Classed catalogs 

a Bibliography and library economy, in the Library School 
h Genealogy and local history, in the history alcove in the gen- 
eral reading room 
These classed catalogs of course duplicate entries in the 
general dictionary catalog. It was first planned to make them 
a part of this general dictionary catalog under the broad head- 
ings, Bibliography, Local history and Genealogy. After the 
reading room was opened it was found rather more convenient, 
even necessary, to take these classed sections out from the 
general dictionary catalog and establish them in the rooms 
and alcoves where the books so cataloged are kept. 

Official catalogs 

Universal catalog, room 142 
An author catalog, including: 

a Depository catalog of the Library of Congress 
b John Crerar Library printed cards 
c Harvard University Library printed cards 
d British Museum accessions slips mounted on cards 
e New York State Library official author cards, one for each 
separate title, with call number, accession number and 
tracing 
/ New York State Library name list cards recording authori- 
ties for author headings adopted — made only for names 
not found as headings on Library of Congress cards 



44 NEW YORK STATE LIBRARY 

g One author card for all books for the blind 
h Cards saved from the old official catalog (before the fire) 
when they contain information not on any of the above 

Accession book, Library Bureau Condensed, room 148 

Consolidated index, room 148 
A description of the Consolidated index is found on pages 36-37 

Shelflist, on cards 7j4cm x I2^cm, room 142. Library of Con- 
gress cards to be used whenever available. 

LIBRARY FOR THE BLIND 

At the time of the fire there were in the hands of readers all 
over the State nearly 500 books, periodicals and pieces of music in 
embossed type. These were all that were saved out of 3299 vol- 
umes which had been accumulated during the twelve years that 
this work has been carried on by the State Library. 

All records were destroyed so that it was impossible to know 
where a single one of these books was located. There Was nothing 
to do but wait for their return in regular course. As soon as they 
began to come in they were utilized for further circulation and the 
first book was sent out on April 10, 191 1, less than two weeks after 
the fire. So many books in embossed type were given to the Library 
immediately after the fire, by readers who had enjoyed its privileges 
in the past and by many institutions for the care and education of 
the blind that by September 30, 191 1, the collection numbered 1039 
volumes. The circulation with this stock for the six months imme- 
diately following the fire was 2479 volumes. 

The printing of books by the State Library, according to its 
custom for some years, was not of course interrupted by the fire 
and the following list of books in New York point was issued 
during the two years ending September 30, 191 1. This list continues 
that which appears on page 45 of the Director's report for 1909. 
The prices annexed do not represent the cost of the book to the 
Library but the price at which it is sold by the Library to other 
institutions which maintain collections of books in embossed type. 

Books published in iqio 

AUTHOR TITLE PRICE 

Cross Mill on the Floss, 5 v $17 50 

Harland My friend Prosper©, 2v 5 .. 

Humphrey Over against Green Peak 3 50 

Loomis Cheerful Americans i 50 

Little Maud and her mamma 
Araminta and the automobile 
While the automobile ran down 
A man of putty 



REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR I9II 45 

Montgomery Anne of Green Gables, 3 v $9 75 

Palmer Life of Alice Freeman Palmer, 2v 7 .. 

Richards Wooing of Calvin Parks 3 50 

Schurz Reminiscences of Carl Schurz, 3 v 10 50 

Tabb Selections from Works 40 

Ten short stories, 2 v 5 . . 

Volume I 

My Lord, the elephant, Kipling 
As one having authority, Bunner 
The cat and the canary, Cameron 
In the Quantick stage, Hopkins 
Wee WilUe WinkieTlCipling 

Volume a 

Did he take the prince to ride. Hale 
Miss Becky's pilgrmiage, Jewett 
A Christmas present for a lady, Kelly 
His Majesty the king, Kipling 
The master of the inn, Herrick 

Three years behind the guns 3 50 

Tileston Chilcken's treasure trove of pearls, 2 v 6 50 

Torrey Footing it in Franconia 3 50 

Books published in igii 

AUTHOR TITLE PRICE 

Abbott Molly Make-believe $2 25 

Allen Kentucky cardinal 2 . . 

Barrie Little white bird, 2 v. (Gift of Miss Nina Rhoades). . 5 . . 

Bryce American commonwealth, pt 2, National government, 

5 V 16 50 

De Morgan Somehow good, 5 v 17 50 

Epictetus Selections 2 . . 

France Crime of Sylvester Bonnard, 2v 6 .. 

Grenfell A man's faith i 50 

Henry, O A municipal report 

Let me feel your pulse .... 

Calloway's code 

Georgia's ruHng 

Ransom of Red Chief 

Sociology in serge and straw ^ 

Palmer Self cultivation m English 70 

Peabody The piper 3 . . 

Rohlfs Leavenworth case, 3 v 9 75 

Wiggin Penelope's experiences in Scotlana, 2v 5 . . 

INDEXING AND EDITING NEW YORK SESSION LAWS 
Under chapter 216, Laws of 1908, the State Library is charged 
with the preparation for publication, the editing and indexing 
of the session laws of each year. When the fire occurred the 
preliminary work of editing the Laws for 191 1 was practically 
completed. This included the preparation of all the prefatory 
matter, such of the tables of the appendix as were then obtain- 
able, the preparation of cards for the index and the tentative in- 
dexing of the perennial items in the appropriation bills. At the 
date of the fire, March 29th, 54 chapters of the Laws of 191 1 had 



> I V 



46 NEW YORK STATE LIBRARY 

been signed by the Governor. These had all been indexed and 
the copy of these laws with side notes and footnotes was ready 
for delivery to the printer. Cards also for the important tables 
of amendments and repeals affected by these chapters had been 
prepared. Every one of these was destroyed as well as some 1200 
index cards which had been held over from the year before for 
use in preparing the cumulative table in the consolidated laws. 
This work had to be done over at a time when the indexing and 
annotating of the chapters being approved was engaging the entire 
attention of the library assistants regularly available for this work. 
All the office files of the printed and engrossed legislative bills for 
preceding years as well as the extensive apparatus of reference 
books, catalogs and indexes were likewise swept away. Dupli- 
cates of these were obtained only after considerable delay and 
after serious handicap to those doing the work. On June 21st the 
Legislature took a recess until September 6th. It was impossible 
to proceed with the printing of the laws enacted before June 21st 
as it was almost certain that further chapters would be enacted 
after the recess. This proved to be the case. The Legislature 
adjourned finally on October 6th, and the ensuing thirty days 
allowed the Governor by the constitution for action on bills in his 
hands at adjournment, postponed final delivery of copy to the 
printer until November 8th. The proof reading was handled with 
all possible expedition and the session laws were printed, bound 
and ready for distribution within the second week in December. 

THE NEW STATE LIBRARY 

LEGISLATION AND APPROPRIATIONS 
After saving what was possible and giving to the damaged 

books and manuscripts such immediate care as was imperative; 
after restoring a semblance of organization and arranging to carry 
on the pressing work both usual and unusual which followed the 
fire, the most important consideration was a program for restoring 
the Library. An adequate new building was already nearly com- 
plete, an expert staff, loyal and tried, was at hand. Public senti- 
ment expressed by press^ and people was quick and unanimous 
to urge a new and greater Library. The one requisite was money. 
Representations to the Governor and the Legislature that a million 
and a quarter dollars should be named by the State as the sum it 
was willing to spend at once to provide a new State Library, not 



* See appendix 3. 



REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR I9II 47 

only met with no opposition but with definite approval and en- 
couragement. A bill was early introduced into the Legislature 
naming this amount of money and, after some vicissitudes, which 
never at any time challenged the wisdom and propriety of the 
measure, was finally passed. The provisions of this bill (chapter 
901, Laws of 1911)2 contemplate the expenditure of a million and 
a quarter dollars within four or five years, certainly as fast as it 
can be spent wisely. This bill and a later act (chapter 521, Laws 
of 1912)2 appropriated $550,000 of this sum for immediate use 
and when to this sum is added the regular annual book appropria- 
tion for the Library which has been continued without change, 
a total of $584,500 has been actually appropriated for the pur- 
chase of books since the fire and the State has by law set its seal 
of approval upon extraordinary appropriations as needed in the 
further sum of $700,000. While these sums do not represent the 
money value of the books destroyed, it is certain that they will 
found for the State a great library, and that the expenditure of 
them within a comparatively brief term of years will give a unity 
and balance to the collection which is inevitably lacking in any 
library that has grown up through a century. It will provide a 
collection of books worthy of the setting which the State has 
made for them in the new building. 

The question of ways and means being thus happily disposed 
of, a well-considered plan became necessary, and the following 
statement of the proposed scope of the new Library was prepared 
and issued in separate form under date of October 20, 191 1. While 
designed for the information of those having books or manuscripts 
to sell, as here reprinted with a few minor changes, it will serve 
as a definitive program for the formation of the new Library. 

SCOPE OF THE COLLECTIONS 

Book purchases. The New York State Library, largely destroyed 
by fire March 29, 191 1, is now, by reason of liberal provision made 
for it by the State, prepared to begin arranging for its new collec- 
tions. 

It is the duty of those charged with the purchase of materials to 
see that the State gets full value for all money expended and to 
make sure that only choice books of real worth and usefulness are 
permitted to enter into the new Library. The act of the Legislature, 
just passed, directs that the foundations now to be laid shall be 
made fit to carry, ultimately, a greater library than the one which 
was burned. 

> See appendixes i and 2 for text of these laws. 



48 NEW YORK STATE LIBRARY 

To this end it seems well to state briefly to dealers and others 
who may have books to give or to sell, and for the information 
of the general public which will be interested, something about the 
scope of the new Library soon to be brought together. 

It is not planned to make the New York State Library a great 
general library. Though it will have some books on most subjects, 
it can not undertake to collect all the books or even all the im- 
portant books on all subjects. It is, however, to be a great refer- 
ence library zealously specializing in certain definite subjects. 

The immediate definite constituency of the Library is of course 
the Legislature, the courts and the departments of the State govern- 
ment with their employees. In recent years as the business of the 
State has increased and the conception of the functions of the State 
has enlarged, the range and volume of the official demands made 
upon the State Library have steadily become greater and greater. 
It is expected that this will continue. It must be abundantly 
provided for. 

A remoter but possibly an even more important constituency of 
the Library is steadily developing^ in every part of the State. Every 
school, every library, and all of the cultural, commercial, pro- 
fessional, and industrial activities in the State are depending upon 
and becoming, in effect, branches of the State Library. Through 
them any individual citizen may expect to find the unusual book not 
found in local collections. It is the business of the State Library 
to serve and to encourage all such, agencies and activities. 

The Library will, from the first, pay special attention to the 
following subjects, and in these subjects will aim to make its col- 
lections preeminent. 

General reference books, a Complete sets of all journals named 
in the chief general indexes to English and American periodicals. 

b All books named in any important indexes to general literature, 
e.g. The A,L,A. Index, A,L.A. Catalog, Granger, Cotgreave, 
Reader's Guide, 

c All strictly " reference books " in all subjects, in the general 
acceptance of the term, an acceptance which may fairly be indicated 
by the scope of Kroeger's Guide to Reference Books. 

d Publications of learned societies with particular attention to 
those on the subjects in which the Library is to specialize. 

e Bibliography ; especially titles listed in New York State Library 
School Bulletins 26 and 5, and Bibliography Bulletin 36. Books 
about books, the history of printing, examples of early printed 
books, of notable bindings, of books from famous presses, of ex- 
ceptional typography. Library history, administration and publi- 
cations. 

Law. All American, British and colonial official, unofficial, side 
and local court reports. 

All series of selected cases or cases covering special topics. 

American, Brit -sh and colonial statute law. 

All law periodicals in the English language, with a selection from 
those in other languages. 



REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR I9II 49 

Digests, tables of cases, citation books and all legal bibliographic 
apparatus necessary to the convenient and exhaustive study of case 
law. 

Legal cyclopedias and dictionaries, American textbooks in all 
editions, legal history and biography, literature of the law, inter- 
national law, constitutional law, trials. 

Reports of American bar associations and legal societies. 

.Such of the statute law and legal literature of foreign countries 
as will be useful to our State courts and departments in passing 
upon foreign questions coming before them, and to the Legislature 
for a comparative study of legislation. 

Medicine. Complete sets of all important medical serials, 
especially those listed in New York State Library Bibliography 
Bulletin 47 and those indexed in Index Medicus, 

Transactions of medical academies and societies, bulletins from 
hospitals, publications from research laboratories, public health re- 
ports, vital statistics. 

Important cyclopedias, handbooks, reference works and texts, 
and of less use but surely claiming a place, the literature recount- 
ing the history and development of the medical sciences and the 
lives of famous physicians. 

History. The standard histories of all countries, with special 
attention to those European nations which were early or active ex- 
plorers of America, which were colonizers of this country and 
which have left traces upon our government, people and institutions. 

Americana will be collected with zeal and in the broadest sense 
of the term, emphasizing strongly the thirteen original colonies. 

The collection of books and manuscripts relating to New York 
State must, of course, be by all odds the best in the country. 

Local history, geography, travels, cartography, American Indians, 
American imprints before 1800, New York imprints before 1825, 
American newspapers before 1830, New York newspapers before 
1850 and a selection of New York State dailies and local papers 
since 1850. American biography and genealogy, with so much of 
English and foreign genealogy as shall be necessary to trace im- 
migrant ancestry, are some of the collateral historical subjects 
which will have attention. 

American literature to be principally represented by first and 
notable editions of the standard authors. 

Education. The State Library is a part of the State Education 
Department, the Regents of the University are its trustees, and 
it is thus directly associated with the administrative educational 
offices of the State. The State Library must make its collections 
on educational theory and practice as complete and as useful as 
is possible to the thousands of educational officers, teachers and 
students throughout the State. Schools, colleges, and universities, 
public and private, in all parts of the country are urged to send to 
the Library as full sets as possible of their reports, catalogs and 
publications. 



50 NEW YORK STATE LIBRARY 

Social science. The Library must have extensive collections on 
social, economic and political science; industrial history; statistics. 
In this field lie the political and economic questions which are the 
subjects of legislation and of State regulation or control. On such 
topics for example as elections, suffrage, labor, taxation, banking 
and finance, municipal government, conservation, public utilities, 
insurance, charities, no pains will be spared to build up notable 
collections. 

Technology and engineering. The State is engaged, as few 
other states are, in great engineering enterprises, and schools and 
students of technology are not only multiplying in numbers but 
pressing their work with unparalleled energy and technical skill. 
The State had just begun the policy of providing a technological 
collection. This should be renewed with all expedition and gen- 
erosity. The Legislature, the public officers, and the technological 
schools must be enabled confidently to look to the State Library 
for any books required in their work. The Library will especially 
strive to secure all the journals in every phase of engineering and 
the publications of all engineering societies. It will more particu- 
larly notice topics which relate to activities or enterprises in which 
the State is engaged: canals, railroads, highways, water storage, 
agriculture, public health and the engineering phases of the utilities 
regulated by the Public Service Commissions. 

Science. Beyond the fundamental general reference material, the 
State Library will specialize in science only so far as may be neces- 
sary to serve such agencies or departments of the State government 
as are doing scientific work. Good working collections will be made 
in geology, zoology, entomology, botany, with more particular at- 
tention to the economic phases of these subjects, and in chemistry 
as related to agriculture, the arts and commerce. 

Manuscripts. Besides the manuscript archives which in accord- 
ance with law are from time to time transferred to the State 
Library by other State departments, the Library will secure all im- 
portant private manuscripts that can be obtained relating to the 
history of the State and to the lives of its public men. Extensive 
collections of letters are especially desirable and the appropriate- 
ness of depositing them in the State Library is suggested to families 
in which such collections exist. 

Government documents. As complete a set as possible of the 
printed documents of the United States Government both in the 
collected and departmental editions. 

The same for every state in the Union. At this point many other 
State libraries have been prompt with offers of substantial help, 
which will be freely availed of as occasions for it arise. 

The collected edition when issued (otherwise the separate edi- 
tions) of the documents of every American city with more than 
25,000 population, and for all counties, cities and incorporated vil- 
lages in New York State. 



REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR I9II 5 1 

In proceeding to secure books according to this program it will 
be assumed that whenever practicable the principle of competition 
as to prices must prevail. The Library will be free to go into the 
markets of the world and all who have materials to sell may be 
assured of fair dealing upon the basis of the best advantage to the 
Library. 

The Library invites tenders from all who have books to offer 
which are within the scope of its proposed collections. 

These tenders must be specific as to price, and clear and accurate 
as to the physical condition and bibliographic identity of the books 
offered. 

Tenders of sets of periodicals, transactions of learned societies, 
state and government reports or serials of any sort should be for 
complete sets only, unless it is well known that the publication is 
exceedingly scarce. 

Representatives of the Library expect to make personal examina- 
tion of important purchases. It is therefore suggested that tenders 
be confined strictly to books actually in hand and not to books which 
individuals or dealers hope or plan to acquire later, unless they are 
standard and easily obtainable in the open market. 

Unusual discounts will be expected for purchases involving con- 
siderable sums. 

Any and all tenders may, of course, be declined. All of the facts 
and conditions affecting each specific tender will be considered and 
purchases will be made upon the basis of the best advantage to the 
State. 

When cash is not paid contracts will be made for future delivery 
at the State Education Building in Albany, N. Y. Payments will 
be made after delivery of goods in satisfactory condition. It is 
likely that many important purchases and those involving large sums 
of money will be made on this contract plan. Form of contract 
to be used, additional copies of this circular, and lists of books 
wanted on particular subjects may be had from the undersigned, to 
whom all tenders and correspondence should be addressed. 

J. I. Wyer, Jr 
Director New York State Library 

THE NEW BUILDING 
The most hopeful feature in the situation which confronted the 
State Library after the fire was the fact that just across the street, 
within a stone's throw of the catastrophe, stood the State Educa- 
tion Building two-thirds done, in which had been provided thor- 
oughly adequate and carefully planned quarters for the State 
Library and its auxiliaries, the Library School and the Division 
of Educational Extension. But for this fact the outlook would 
have been discouraging indeed, as our experience in trying to 



52 NEW YORK STATE LIBRARY 

find temporary quarters clearly showed there was not in the city 
of Albany a building suitable to house all the work of the State 
Library even temporarily. If there had been no provision in sight 
for permanent quarters and it had been necessary to depend upon 
temporary quarters for a term of years, the prospect would have 
been so dreary that it is doubtful whether a competent staff could 
have been held together or liberal appropriations secured for the 
restoration of the work. With the new building nearly finished, 
it has been, of course, possible to plan with definite regard to the 
exact location of the various lines of work with a definite knowl- 
edge of floor and stack areas to be available, and this has throughout 
the eighteen months of reorganization lent a definiteness to all 
work. It will not be possible to open any reading room, under- 
take any reference work, even by correspondence, or to resume any 
of the public functions of the State Library proper until the new 
building is occupied. This it is expected will be about the first 
of October 1912. 

New work. The preceding report deals only with the fire and 
with the specific work of restoration and reconstruction which 
has grown immediately out of the fire. Though there have been 
within the six months following the fire which are covered by 
this report considerable new work done, book purchases made, 
and exchange relations reestablished with all parts of the world, 
gifts received and handled, the usual resignations, appointments and 
promotions incident to a staff of nearly 100 people, any detailed 
account of such matters will be left for the next report. All statis- 
tics are omitted as, because of the unusual conditions, figures would 
mean nothing either in themselves or by way of comparison. 



-, 



REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR I9II S3 



NEW YORK STATE LIBRARY SCHOOL 

PREPARED BY FRANK K. WALTER, VICE DIRECTOR 

The period from September 30, 1909 to September 30, 191 1, 
which is covered in this summary report, includes two very dis- 
similar years of the school's history. The 23d school year opened 
October 6, 1909 with 43 students enrolled in regular standing. 
Seven staff members took special work. The school work progressed 
smoothly and the year was marked by no radical changes in policy 
or curriculum. The degree of B.L.S. was conferred on 11 students 
during the year. The summer session, under the direction of 
Miss Corinne Bacon, was filled to the utmost limit of suitable 
accommodations. Thirty applicants were admitted and several 
others denied admission because of lack of space. An innovation 
was made in the general plan of the summer school. Instead of 
one general course of six weeks, two distinct courses of three weeks 
each were given, one dealing with the technical side of library 
work; the other, devoted more especially to reference work and 
bibliography. The innovation was so successful that it was decided 
to hold these short courses every other year, alternating with the 
six-weeks general course. This plan was unavoidably interrupted 
but will probably be carried out in the future. 

The year from September 30, 1910 to September 30, 191 1, in 
marked contrast with its predecessor, was one of the most eventful 
years in the school's history. The 24th school year opened with 
an enrolment of 41 students from 20 different states and from 
Norway. The school work progressed very well and without special 
incident until March 29, 191 1, when the rooms, all the school's 
equipment, the private professional collections of the students and 
the faculty and all the records of the school were destroyed in the 
fire which at the same time wiped out the State Library and the 
State offices situated on the third, fourth and fifth floors of the 
west end of the Capitol. 

A temporary schedule was at once arranged and school work, 
which was resumed on the morning of March 30th, was continued 
until the end of the school year in the State Normal College. Fortu- 
nately, the year had so far advanced and the important courses 
were so well under way that it was possible to complete the year 
fairly satisfactorily with the resources proffered by the local 



54 NEW YORK STATE LIBRARY 

libraries of Albany and to decline with grateful appreciation, the 
offers of temporary quarters made by several other libraries of 
the State. 

Steps were immediately taken, by the State Library to purchase 
books useful alike to the Library and the school and during the 
summer of 191 1, a good working collection was assembled. 

The summer session was necessarily omitted until such time 
as suitable space and working material were available. 

Considering the completeness of the catastrophe, the effect on 
the school was much less injurious than might have been expected. 
Students and faculty vied with each other in accommodating them- 
selves to new conditions and the amount of school equipment in the 
form of books and other material for practice work which it was 
found possible to provide at once was surprisingly large and well 
adapted to the school's needs. The summer was utilized by the 
faculty in reconstructing collections and courses and by the close 
of the year on September 30, 191 1, the plans for the next year's 
work were well matured. 

Detailed information concerning the school during these two 
years will be found in its annual reports for 1910 and 191 1 which, 
as usual, are published separately, as Library School Bulletins 29 
and 30. 



REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR I9II 55 

DIVISION OF EDUCATIONAL EXTENSION 

PREPARED BY W. R. EASTMAN, CHIEF OF THE DIVISION 

The object of this division is to expand the work of the schools 
by promoting the free use of good books by all the people of the 
State. It is concerned with public libraries, traveling libraries and 
study clubs. 

By its field workers and by correspondence the division is ex- 
pected to reach every existing public library, to come into personal 
touch with managers and officers, to learn at first hand the condi- 
tions of their work and to encourage and aid them in every possible 
way. 

In any locality where no public collection of books is available 
this division seeks either to place a traveling library or to estab- 
lish a permanent public library. Its representatives visit any. place 
where such a library is or may be proposed, explain the law, offer 
the liberal aid and advice of the State, suggest methods of opera- 
tion, seek to develop local interest and press the matter to a suc- 
cessful conclusion. 

After incorporation and official inspection a library may be regis- 
tered as maintaining a proper library standard and thus become 
entitled to certain privileges and grants of money offered by the 
State. 

In the course of establishment, incorporation and registry the 
libraries come under State supervision and are thereafter officially 
visited from year to year. Such repeated visitation assures the 
office that the proper standard is maintained, arouses fresh interest 
and imparts a clearer understanding of the best methods in library 
work. It also supplies an official record of all the libraries. 

More prolonged attention is given to individual libraries by two 
library organizers attached to the division. These are expert 
librarians who are ready to give to any new or small library two 
weeks of service in arranging and cataloging books with instruction 
and aid to local workers. This service is also extremely fruitful 
in awakening new interest in all that relates to the library and in 
opening new fields. 

The division also serves the libraries in arranging and conducting 
each year, in cooperation with the New York State Library Asso- 
ciation, a series of about thirty institute and round table meetings. 
These bring together in all parts of the State small groups of libra- 
rians and trustees for mutual acquaintance, comparing notes, dis- 
cussing methods and receiving skilled instruction. 



56 NEW YORK STATE LIBRARY 

All libraries are required by law to report annually and these 
reports, numbering 1389 in the year 191 1, are received by this divi- 
sion and a summary of the results is submitted to the Legislature 
and published. 

The State distributes $35,000 a year in sums of $100 or less to 
registered free libraries for buying approved books. The neces- 
sary applications, allotments, accounts and enforcement of condi- 
tions are in charge of this division. 

The division has in its charge a stock of about 50,000 volumes, 
from which hundreds of traveling libraries are annually sent out. 
Some of these libraries are in fixed groups of twenty-five or fifty 
books each, intended for general reading. Many more, selected 
from time to time to accompany the study of special subjects, are 
sent to study clubs. 

Any five persons in the State desiring to hold ten meetings, cov- 
ering a period of ten weeks, for the study of an approved subject, 
may be registered as a study club and receive the aid of this division 
in preparing, its program and selecting books to be purchased and 
lent by the State. 

The division also prepares and issues four times a year New 
York Libraries, a periodical of thirty-two pages devoted to the 
interests of the libraries of the State. Every number contains 
articles contributed by experienced workers in this peculiar field, 
editorial columns, notes from the office and news from the libraries. 
Select lists of books on special subjects frequently appear. This 
publication, begun in 1907, is proving to be of vital importance as 
an official organ of communication with the scattered libraries. 

Another line of service is the aid offered in the preparation of 
plans for library buildings. Any inquiry in regard to the selection 
of books, library methods, questions of library law or any other 
library matter is cordially received and answered according to the 
best authority which the division can command. 

The division was seriously crippled by the total loss of its records 
and past correspondence as well as by the destruction of about 
60,000 books in the fire. At the same time there were more books 
in the hands of borrowers through the State in that month than at 
any other season of the year and these books were among the best 
of the collection. In due time they were returned and furnish a 
very valuable stock of nearly 40,000 books in hand for present and 
future service. The great disaster has impressed upon us the fact 
that the success of library extension does not depend upon the 
accumulation and preservation of records at the State Capitol, im- 



REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR I9II 57 

portant as these may be, but rather upon the forces set at work in 
communities all over the State, creating new conceptions of the 
worth of books and leading to more earnest and more intelligent 
efforts to bring the means of self -education within the reach of 
every one. 

Our inspectors report a vast difference between the public libra- 
ries of today and those of even five years ago. The changes are of 
a kind which mere statistics can not show. The new library build- 
ings appearing not only in great cities but also in small villages and 
in summer resorts are the outward signs of growth. They appeal 
to the eye and impress the imagination. The facilities for readers 
are better. The arrangement of books is better. The care taken in 
selection of books is greater. The librarians, as a body, show better 
appreciation of their opportunities and of the significance of their 
service, a more intelligent grasp of the situation and a more earnest 
"Spirit. 

Looking back it is possible to trace sane influences tending to 
these results, such as the bounty and care as well as the require- 
ments of the State; the official visitation and personal interest; 
the list of selected books published year by year; the Library 
School and its summer sessions; the patient and extended work 
of library organizers; the meetings of the State Library Associa- 
tion and the familiar library round table meetings; the circulars 
and the quarterly bulletin. And to these we must add the gifts 
of the wealthy men and women who have found in the public 
library a means of doing good on a broad scale and in a way that 
pleased them; all these have worked together to bring about the 
change that has been noted. These are results which can not be 
put back by any local disaster. 

After the fire the first effort of the division was to replace, as 
far as possible, its record of accounts with the libraries for State 
money, its dated index of library incorporations and registry, its 
traveling library records and its mailing lists. It was able to secure 
these from the cashier's records and minutes of the Board of 
Regents, which were unharmed, and from the printed handbook of 
Department organization. A general call sent out by the public 
press to all persons and institutions having traveling libraries met 
with prompt response and, within a month, the division in its 
temporary quarters was carrying on its usual work. The applica- 
tions for traveling libraries have been so numerous that it has 
been impossible to supply them with such promptness as we could 
desire. 



58 



NEW YORK STATE LIBRARY 



In the statements and tables which follow, the transactions of 
two years, 1910 and 191 1, not previously published in this form, 
are given separately to admit of comparison year by year. 

CHARTERS, REGISTRY AND TRANSFERS 
During the year ending September 30, 1910, 24 libraries were 
incorporated. Three of these replaced libraries previously estab- 
lished, but 21 were new. Sixteen of the above libraries were provi- 
sionally chartered. Absolute charters were given to 16 previously 
acting under provisional charters. 

Nineteen libraries were registered as maintaining a proper stand- 
ard. Regents approval was given to six transfers of books and 
other library property. The acceptance of conditional library gifts 
was approved and recorded in two instances. One library name was 
changed and nine library corporations whose books had been trans- 
ferred to other and larger library systems and which .had ceased 
operations for some years, were dissolved. The gain for the year 
in the number of libraries chartered and registered was 19, making 
a total enrolment of 469. 

Library charters October i, 1909-Septeinber 30, 1910 



NO. 


POST OFFICE 


CORPORATE NAME 


I 


Dobbs Ferry 


The Dobbs Ferry Free Library 
Harrison Free Library 
Locust Valley Library 
Mount Kisco Public Library 
Mount Morris Library 
Memorial Hall Free Library 
Cogswell Free Public Library 
Piennont Public Library 


2 


Harrison 


3 

4 

5 
6 


Locust Valley 


Mount Klisco 


Mount Morris 


Nunda 


7 


Orwell 


1 
8 


Piennont 



I 

2 

3 
4 
5 
6 

7 
8 

9 
10 

II 

12 

13 

14 

15 
16 



AmityviUe 

Belfast 

BelleyiUe 

Bemus Point. . 

Chester 

Franklin 

Franklinville. . . 

Madalin 

Mattituck 

Portyille 

South Dansville 

Spencerport 

Stamford 

Union Springs, 



Valois Valois Free Library 

Walden ' Walden Public Library 



Provisional charters made absolute 

AmityviUe Free Library 

Belfast Public Library 

Philomathean Free Library 

Bemus Point Library 

Chester Free Library 

Franklin Free Library 

Franklinyille Free Library 

Tivoli Public Library 

Mattituck Free Library 

Portyille Free Library 

Ladies Free Library 

Farmers Library Company of the Town of Ogden 

Stamford Village Library 

Springport Free Library 



REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR I9II 



59 



Library charters October x, xgo^-September 30, 19x0 (concluded) 



NO. 


POST OFFICE 


CORPORATE NAME 




I 


Berlin 


Provisional charters for five years 
Berlin Free Town Library 
Blauvelt Free Library 
East Quogue Free Library 
General James Clinton Free Library 
FayetteviUe Free Library 
Johnsonburg Free Library 
Lyons Falls Free Library 
Marion Free Library 
Arbutus Free Library 
Port Jefferson Free Library 
Rochester Polish National Library 
Margaret Reaney Memorial Library 
Sherrill Free Library 
Varysburg Free Library 
Whitehall Free Library 
Worcester Free Library 




2 


Blauvelt 




'I 


Gast OuoGTue 






4 

5 
6 


East Springfield 

Favetteville 




Tohnsonbure 




7 


Lvons Falls 




8 


Marion 




Q 


Newcomb 




10 


Port Jefferson 




TT 


Rochester 




12 


St TohnsviUe 




J'K 


Sherrill 






VarysbursT 




IS 


WhiVhftll.. 




t6 


Worcester 











Rochester 



Charter amended 

Name of Rochester Polish National Library 
changed to Rochester Polish Peoples Library 



Library transfers approved October i, 1909-September 30, 19x0 




I 

2 

3 

4 

5 
6 



Coxsackie Free Library 

Motmt Morris Union Free School 

EHstrict 
Piermont Improvement Association . 
Ravena Free Library 

St Johnsville Free Library 

Utica Art Association 



Coxsackie, Heermance Memorial Li- 
brary 
Mount Morris Library 

Piermont Public Library 

School District no. 3, Town of Coey- 
mans 

St Johnsville, Margaret Reaney Mem- 
orial Library 

Utica Public Library 



Corporations dissolved 

1 Bay Ridge Free Library having been transferred to the Brooklyn Public 
i* Library, the corporation was dissolved by the Regents March 31, 1910. 

2 Bronx Free Library having been transferred to the New York Public Library, 

the corporation was dissolved by the Regents March 31, 19 10. 

3 Coxsadde Free Library having been transferred to the Heermance Memorial 

Library, the corporation was dissolved by the Regents March 31, 1910. 

4 Granville Free Library having been transferred to the Pember Library and 

Museum, the corporation was dissolved by the Regents December 16, 1909. 

5 HoUis Public Library having been transferred to the Queens Borough Public 

Library, the corporation was dissolved by the Regents March 31,1910. 



6o 



NEW YORK STATE LIBRARY 



Corporations dissolved (concluded) 

6 Newark Valley Public Library having been transferred to the Tappan-Spauld- 

ing Memorial Library, the corporation was dissolved by the Regents March 

31. 1910- 

7 Richmond Hill Library having been transferred to the Queens Borough Public 

Library, the corporation was dissolved by the Regents March 31, 19 10. 

8 White Plains Public Library having been transferred to the White Plains Public 

Library, the corporation was dissolved by the Regents March 31, 1910. 

9 Woodside Library of Morton Comers dissolved by the Regents March 31 , 191 o 





Approval of acceptance of conditional gifts 




NO. 


LIBRARY 


FROM 


AMOUNT 


I 


Patchogue Library 


Andrew Carnegie 


$IS 000 


2 


Theresa Free Library 


Andrew Cameeie 


7 SCO 






/ 0^^ 



Libraries registered October i, 1909-September 30, 191 o 



NO. 



I 
2 

3 

4 

5 
6 

7 
8 

9 
10 

II 

12 

13 

14 

15 
16 

17 
18 

19 



POST OFFICE 



Amityville 

Antwerp 

Bedford.. 

Bemus Point . . . 

Brooklyn 

Buffalo 

Castleton 

Dobbs Ferry. . . 
East Quogue . . . 
East Springfield 

Franklin 

Greenwood .... 

Monroe 

Mount Kisco . . . 

New Paltz 

New York 

Piermont 

Pike 

Ravena 



NAME OF LIBRARY 



AmitjTville Free Library 

Antwerp Free Library 

Bedford Free Library 

Bemus Point Library 

Brooklyn Public Library, Kensington Branch 

Buffalo Public Library, S. V. R. Watson Branch 

Castleton Public Library 

The Dobbs Ferry Free Library 

East Quogue Free Library 

General James Clinton Free Library 

Franklin Free Library 

Greenwood Free Library 

Monroe Free Library 

Mount Kisco Public Library 

New Paltz Free Library 

New York Public Library, Hamilton Fish Park Branch 

Piermont PubHc Library 

Pike Library 

Ravena Public Library 



During the year ending September 30, 191 1, 16 library charters 
were granted. Three of these were to replace libraries previously 
connected with the University and 13 were new. Ten of the above 
charters were provisional for five years. An absolute charter was 
given to one library previously acting under a provisional charter. 
The charter of one was amended by a change of name. Two corpo- 
rations were dissolved. The net gain for the year was therefore 11. 



REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR I9II 



61 



Thirty-two libraries were registered as maintaining a proper 
standard. Nine of them do not appear elsewhere on the roll and 
the total gain was therefore 20 libraries, making a total enrolment 
of 489. 

Library charters October i, 1910-September 30, 191 1 



NO. 



I 

2 

3 

4 

5 
6 



POST OFFICE 



East Hampton 

Homell 

Hudson Falls . . 



Little Falls 
Sherbtirne . 
Smithtown. 



CORPORATE NAME 



I I Fayetteville, 



I 

2 

3 

4 

5 
6 

7 
8 

9 
10 



Carthage 

Eden 

Howard 

Jasper 

Lawyersville . . . 

Newf ane 

Sharon Springs. 

Watkins 

Williamsville 
Wilson 



Absolute charters 
East Hampton Free Library .... 

Homell Public Library 

Hudson Falls Free Library As- 
sociation 

Little Falls Public Library 

The Sherburne Public Library. . . 
Smithtown Library 

Provisional charter made absolute 
I Fayetteville Free Library I 



Provisional charters for five years 

Carthage Free Library 

Eden Free Library 

Howard Free Library 

Jasper Free Library 

Lawyersville Free I^ibrary 

Newf ane Free Library 

Sharon Springs Free Library . . . . 

Wedgewood Free Library 

Williamsville Free Library 

Wilson Free Library 



VOL- 


UMES 


6 


000 


17 


450 


I 


252 


6 


909 


• ■ 

2 


■ • • • 

600 



PROPERTY 



$16 673 92 
48 246 .. 



• • 



20 000 . . 

3 799 65 



975 I I 615 52 



175 



26 



369 



427 74 



214 49 
138 50 



341 



Nunda 



Charter amended 

Name of Memorial Hall Free Library changed to Bell 
Memorial Library 



Library transfers approved October i, 1910-September 30, 19x1 



NO. 


FROM 


TO 


I 
2 

3 

4 


Board of Education, Little Falls. . . 

Locust Valley Public Library 

Sherburne Public Library 

Board of Education, Sidney 


Little Falls Public Library 
Locust Valley Library 
The Sherburne Public Library 
Sidney Public Library 



Corporations dissolved 

The Fort Hamilton Free Library, having been transferred to the Brooklyn 
Public Library, the corporation was dissolved by the Regents April 19, 191 1. 

Sherburne Public Library, having been transferred to The Sherburne Public 
Library, the corporation was dissolved by the Regents Jime 22, 191 1. 



62 



NEW YORK STATE LIBRARY 



Approval of acceptance of conditional gift 



LIBRARY 


FROM 


AMOUNT 


Rockville Centre Public Library 


Andrew Carnegie 


$10 OOO 



Libraries registered October i, 1910-September 30, igii 



NO 



I 

2 

3 



5 
6 

7 
8 

9 
10 

II 
12 

13 

14 

15 
16 

17 
18 

19 
20 

21 

22 

23 

24 

25 
26 

27 
28 

29 
30 

31 
32 



POST OFFICE 



Berlin 

Blauvelt 

Brooklyn 

Brooklyn 

Coxsackie 

East Hampton . . 
East Hounsfield . 

Fayetteville 

Garrattsville. . . . 
Goshen 

Homell 

Hudson Falls 

Jamaica 

Jamaica 
amaica 

amaica 

ohnsonburg. . . . 
Locust Valley. . . 

Lyons Falls 

Marion 

Mount Morris. . . 
Northport 

Oaks Comers . . . 

Orwell 

Port Jefif erson . . . 

Sherburne 

Sodus 

Stone Ridge 

Utica 

Varysburg 

WhitehaU 

Worcester 



NAME 



Berlin Free Town Library 

Blauvelt Free Library 

Brooklyn Institute Central Mu- 
seimi Library 

Brooklyn PubUc Library, Borough 
Park branch 

Heermance Memorial Library. . . . 

East Hampton Free Library 

East Hounsfield Free Library .... 

Fayetteville Free Library 

Garrattsville Library 

Goshen Library and Historical 
Society 

Homell Public Library 

Hudson Falls Free Library Associa- 
tion 

Queens Borough Public L(ibrary, 
Brooklyn Manor branch 

Corona branch 

Ridgewood Heights branch 

Woodside branch 

Johnsonburg Free Library 

Locust Valley Library 

Lyons Falls Free Library 

Marion Free Library 

Mount Morris Library 

Northport Literary and Library 
Union 

Oaks Comers Book Club Free Li- 
brary 

Cogswell Free Public Library 

Port Jefiferson Free Library 

The Sherburne Public Library 

Sodus Circtilating Library 

Stone Ridge Library 

Utica Pubhc Library, Potter branch 

Varysburg Free Library 

Whitehall Free Library 

Worcester Free Library 



VOL- 
UMES 



985 



2 670 
6 000 
I 125 



3 600 
17 450 



1 270 

2 400 
I 250 



40? 
I 625 



804 
2 773 



370 
260 



I 071 



3 200 
325 



PROPERTY 



$450 97 



• 


2 


700 


■ • 


16 


673 


92 


I 


535 


73 


2 
48 


556 
503 


54 
62 










I 


274 •• 
998 78 


8 


220 . . 

184 74 


I 


359 
800 


• • 

27 


20 


oco 

802 


• • 

45 


I 


800 
431 


• • 

91 





EXPENDITURES 
1910 

The expenditures for the year ending September 30, 1910, aside 

from salaries and expenses of administration, were as follows: 



REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR I9II 63 

347 allotments to free libraries, $31,042.17; a small decrease from 
last year in the number of allotments, but also a small increase in 
amount. Twenty-three approved applications amounting to $1873.31 
were carried over the year's end for lack of funds with which to 
pay. Books and binding for traveling libraries cost $6049.54. 

1911 

The corresponding expenditures for last year were as follows: 
342 allotments to free libraries $29,965.99; a small decrease from 
the preceding year both in number and amount of allotments, but 
one that was made necessary by the limit of the State appropriation. 
Twenty approved applications amounting to $1663 were carried 
over to be paid from the funds of the following year. Books and 
binding for traveling libraries cost $5691.96. 

FIELD WORK 

1910 

During the year ending September 30, 19 10, 322 library visits 
were made by the field workers of the division. Two library or- 
ganizers were occupied in the work of setting libraries in order. 
Thirty-four libraries received their help for periods varying from 
three days to two weeks. Their services were fruitful in reviving 
local library interest and in marked improvement of all library 
conditions wherever they went. They also found time to pay 131 
visits of inspection. 

1911 

The record for the last year, owing to the loss of papers, is not 
quite complete. At least 331 visits were made. For three months, 
from October i to December 31, 1910, there was but one library 
organizer in service, on account of the resignation of Miss Zaidee 
Brown to undertake similar work in Massachusetts. Soon after 
the appointment of Miss Caroline Webster special attention was 
given to the canvass of rural neighborhoods and attendance at 
farmers conventions, with a view to introducing more traveling 
libraries in places now remote from library privileges. Our own 
ability to meet the resulting demand has, of course, been seriously 
impaired but as soon as we are in a position to buy new books in 
liberal quantities the results of this canvass may be expected to 
appear. 

The two organizers visited 139 libraries, of which 24 were put 
in order by them. 



64 



NEW YORK STATE LIBRARY 



ROUND TABLE MEETINGS 

During the month of May in each year the library round table 
meetings arranged by the New York Library Association received 
the earnest attention of the field force of the division. In 1910, 
31 meetings were held, carefully distributed over the entire State, 
with a total attendance of 983 persons representing 334 libraries. 
This was an increase for the year of 79 libraries and 217 persons 
and was an important indication of the rising tide of library interest. 

In 191 1, out of 30 meetings in the State, 22 were conducted by 
members of the division staff and 14 of them by the two library 
organizers. The attendance of libraries at these meetings was 302 
represented by 760 persons. Though these figures are not quite so 
large as those of last year, there are strong evidences that the 
interest in library work is still growing and that the effort to learn 
the best way of doing it is more earnest than ever. 

NEW YORK LIBRARIES 

The quarterly bulletin New York Libraries, sending out regu- 
larly an edition of 3500, has now completed its fourth year. After 
the copy for the number of last April was completed and ready for 
the printer the manuscript was burned. An entire new number was 
thereupon compiled and issued by the indefatigable editor. This 
periodical continues to give its indispensable aid to our work. 

TRAVELING LIBRARIES 
1910 

September 30, 19 10 there were 96,213 volumes in the collection 
used in sending out traveling libraries. Of these, 45,142 books, or 
nearly one-half, were sent out during 1910 in response to 819 
applications as shown in the following table: 



TO WHOM LENT 



Groups of taxpayers . . 

Public libraries 

Public schools 

Study clubs 

House libraries 

Charitable institutions 
Other organizations . . . 



NUMBER OF 


NUMBER 0^ 


LIBRARIES 


VOLUMES 


LENT 


SENT 


28 


2 929 


70 


6 289 


77 


8 413 


388 


17 770 


152 


I 524 


ID 


I 135 


94 


7 082 



819 



45 142 



REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR I9II 



65 



191 1 

Since the traveling library records were destroyed the division 
has been dependent on its borrowers for their reconstruction. The 
total number of volumes reported since the fire as in borrower's 
hands is 38,936. In one or two cases libraries have been reported 
in which the number of volumes has not been stated. It is there- 
fore impossible to include them in the report. To the number stated 
should be added about 3000 duplicates which had been stored in the 
Capitol basement and were thus saved. 

While the volumes saved through being out at the time of the 
fire represent a good working collection yet the constant fluctuation 
in the popularity of subjects, particularly with study clubs, caused 
heavy losses in certain lines. Russia, Germany, Mexico, India, 
South America and early English history are the subjects which 
suffered most. 

The only accurate report of the circulation of books that can be 
made is that for the six months from April to October 191 1. 

In that time there have been placed 10,223 volumes in response 
to 207 applications, as shown in the following table : 



TO WHOM LENT 



Taxpayers 

Public libraries 

Public schools 

Study clubs 

House libraries 

Charitable institutions 
Other organizations. . . 



NUMBER OF 

LIBRARIES 

LENT 



NUMBER OF 

VOLUMES 

SENT 



13 
22 

9 
18 

3 
9 



207 



874 
819 
894 
018 
168 
650 
800 



10 223 



As these figures represent only libraries actually sent out during 
these months or those which have been formally renewed, they 
do not represent the total number of volumes in circulation. 

As a matter of memory it can be stated that the total number 
of volumes sent out during the previous six months was somewhat 
larger than it had been in the preceding year. The reduction in fee 
resulted in an increased demand for libraries which came as was 
hoped from groups of taxpayers and from small schools. 



66 



NEW YORK STATE LIBRARY 



After the fire an attempt was made to transfer as many libraries 
as possible from one community to another without having them 
returned to Albany and about lOO were disposed of in this way. 

When it is remembered that with the exception of libraries first 
transferred it has been necessary to wait for each book to be re- 
turned and for each book before going out to be accessioned and 
cataloged, it will be realized that mere lack of working force has 
prevented a larger number of volumes from being sent out in that 
time. This will be seen from the fact that since the fire it has 
been possible to send out but 207 libraries while 409 requests were 
received. As these requests have been taken up in order it has so 
far been impossible to do anything beyond the mere recording and 
acknowledging of one until a month after its receipt. In conse- 
quence of the delay 20 requests have been canceled. 

The number of study clubs formally reporting is 284. A gen- 
erous response to an appeal for club programs has rendered the 
stock for lending almost as complete as before. 

Some syllabuses have been bought, but those published by the 
Department and the valuable English ones, the legacy of former 
days, have not been replaced. 

In the double task of reconstructing the records and at the same 
time carrying on the constantly enlarging work of the section, two 
elements have been conspicuous, the cheerfulness and zeal of each 
member of the staff and the patience, consideration and apprecia- 
tion shown by the borrowing public. 

LIBRARY PROGRESS 
The following is a statement in some detail of library conditions 

in the State. 

Libraries. Reports were received for the year 1910 from 1345 

libraries and for 191 1 from 1389 libraries which may be classified 

by their relations to the Department as follows: 



State Library 

Incorporated or admitted libraries 

Libraries registered only 

High school or academy libraries 

Libraries of other institutions in the Department such as col 

leges and professional schools 

Libraries of State institutions not in the Department ...... 

Libraries not connected with the Department , 

Total 



1910 



I 345 



1911 



I 


I 


280 


284 


155 


155 


804 


845 


34 


40 


12 


13 


59 


51 



1 389 



REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR I9II 



ey 



These libraries in 191 1 contained 9,718,899 volumes. The dimin- 
ished total for 191 1 is due to the destruction of the State Library. 

The tables which follow present a summary of library statistics 
for the State, year by year, from 1893. 

Comparative summary of all libraries reporting 189 3-1 9 11 





NO. OF 
LIBRARIES 


VOLUMES 


CIRCULATION 


YEAR 


Added 


Total 


i8q'^ 


600 
704 

723 
806 

869 
938 

I 035 
I 137 

I 137 
I 160 

I 140 

I 243 

I 266 

I 282 

I 301 

I 306 

I 345 
I 389 


225 195 

246 751 

258 741 
296 498 

324 687 
373 615 
441 964 

483 551 
616 941 

464 751 
435 898 
456 904 
488 996 
552 292 

558 331 
608 044 

720 954 


3 851 943 

4 133 378 
4 392 999 
4 647 661 

4 934 889 

5 393 106 

5 846 519 

6 217 980 
6 796 241 

6 975 540 

7 415 376 

7 700 367 

8 164 686 

8 890 485 

9 355 121 
9 636 235 
9 957 225 

10 094 246 
9 718 899 


"* i';6 602 


* '-'7O 

1 804. 


^O" wv-* 

'K 61Q 178 


a. v^^^t 

i8qs 


4 1^6 744 


*'^70 

1896 


s 008 402 


1807 


5 814 470 


i8g8 


7 248 240 


X v^vr 

i8qq 


1 T^ ^ J 

8 ^^72 'K%% 


*-^77 

1900 


8 760 678 


IQOI 


10 227 7-^5 


* 7^" * 

IQ02 


10 984 62s 


M.^-^M. 

IQO'; 


II 8-^9 828 


*7*'0 

IQ04 


12 210 4S8 


IQOS ; 


I-i 266 770 


*^"o 

1906 


•*0 *•*'*' 117 

14 002 ^SO 


IQO7 


16 S7S 161 


^7 1 

IQO8 


17 6'^0 41-* 


* -^ " 

IQOQ 


19 916 346 

20 542 355 

21 482 990 


*7^7 

IQIO 


^y*'^ .' 

IQII 


683 656 


*7** 



Free lending libraries reporting 1893-igii 



t- 


LIBRARIES 


CIRCULATION 


YEAR 


No. 


Volumes 


Total 


Per day 


Per 1000 
popula- 
tion 


Per 
100 
vol. 


1893 

1894 

1895 

1896 

1897 

1898 

1899 

1900 

I9OI 

1902 

1903 

1904 

1905 

1906 

1907 

1908 

1909 

I9IO 

I9II 


238 
293 
309 
351 

375 
408 

431 
460 

529 
550 

555 
573 
655 
678 

661 
686 
689 
710 
661 


849 995 
I 049 869 

I 127 199 

I 313 299 

I 446 874 

I 755 036 

1 979 319 

2 187 125 
2 425 260 

2 598 472 

2 804 628 

3 108 365 
3 437 876 
3 645 662 

3 782 609 

4 050 563 
4 227 665 
4 341 103 
4 635 716 


2 293 861 

2 766 973 

3 146 405 

3 933 623 

4 904 793 

6 439 999 

7 395 527 

8 452 445 

9 232 697 
10 063 703 

10 897 126 

11 347 802 

12 086 816 

13 835 639 

14 968 722 

16 479 457 

18 747 849 

19 254 729 

20 122 745 


6 285 

7 581 

8 620 
10 777 

13 438 
17 644 
20 262 

23 157 
25 350 
27 571 

29 855 
31 089 

33 115 
37 906 
41 010 

45 146 

51 364 

52 753 
55 131 


352 

425 

483 
604 

753 

989 

I 135 

I 163 

I 270 

I 385 
I 500 

I 561 

I 663 

I 715 

1 855 

2 043 

2 324 

2 387 
2 208 


269 
263 

279 
300 

339 
367 
373 
387 
381 

387 
390 

365 
352 
380 

396 

407 

443 
445 
435 



68 



NEW YORK STATE LIBRARY 



Books and circulation of city libraries. The following table 
shows the population of each of the 49 cities of the State with the 
volumes in free libraries, their circulation for the last year and the 
amount paid by tax for their support. 

In this connection it should be noted that in 20 cities the free 
libraries report more or less income from endowments, in addition 
to or in place of that derived from public taxation. In Newburgh 
and Oneida free libraries are maintained at public expense as a 
part of the school system for which no separate reports of the 
cost of the library are available. 



Free libraries in cities 191 1 



CITY 



Albany 

Amsterdam 

Auburn 

Binghamton 

Buffalo 

Cohoes 

Coming 

Cortland 

Dunkirk 

Elmira 

Fulton 

Geneva 

Glens Falls 

Gloversville 

Hornell 

Hudson 

Ithaca 

Jamestown 

Johnstown 

Kingston 

Lackawanna 

Little Falls 

Lockport 

Midoletown 

Mount Vernon . . . . 

New Rochelle 

New York 

Manhattan 

Bronx 

Richmond 

Brooklyn 

Queens 

Newburgh 

Niagara Falls 

North Tonawanda. 

Ogdensburg 

Olean 

Oneida 



Population 
in 1910 



4 
2 



100 

31 

34 
48 

423 

24 

13 
II 

17 

37 
10 

12 

15 
20 

13 
II 

•14 

31 
10 

25 

14 
12 

17 
15 
30 
28 
766 

331 
430 

85 

634 

284 

27 
30 
II 

15 

14 
8 



253 
267 

668 

443 
715 
709 

730 

504 
221 

176 

480 

446 

243 
642 

617 

417 
802 

297 

447 
908 

549 

273 
970 

313 
919 

867 

883 

542 
980 
969 

351 
041 

805 

445 
955 
933 
743 
317 



Volumes 

in free 

libraries 



} 



68 245 
II 643 
56 840 

24 556 
297 038 

6 444 

10 785 

11 928 

• 17 374 

7 III 

53 238 

11 620 
a27 684 

16 663 
6 719 

21 724 

12 247 

9 547 

6 909 
10 653 

13 987 
23 956 
27 659 

832 633 

887 522 



805 935 

139 176 

36 961 

21 755 
10 414 

15 943 
9 962 

10 370 



Circulation 



326 199 

60 440 

66 735 

143 697 

953 642 

29 973 

18 428 

54 067 
71 109 
23 910 

19 814 

31 194 
a45 806 

23 837 
13 596 

89 090 

36 165 
46 061 

26 051 

36 669 

58 659 

141 501 

133 983 

12 943 457 

7 795 911 

4 270 888 

876 658 

94 161 

70 812 

32 741 
28 480 
58 205 

7 487 



Library 
taxation 
for 191 1 



12 600 
2 500 

5 000 
10 200 

99 950 
300 
800 



3 000 

4 500 
I 500 



I 000 
05 000 

I 500 



2 500 

3 048 



550 .. 
I 100 . . 
4 000 . . 

10 200 . . 

1 1 000 . . 
192 790 69 

627 843 69 



424 947 . . 
140 000 . . 


7 
2 

2 

4 


800 .. 
500 .. 
000 . . 
000 . . 



a For year ending December 31, 1910. 
b No report received. 



REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR I9II 



69 



Free libraries in cities 191 1 (concliided) 



CITY 



Oneonta 

Oswego 

Plattsburg. . . 
Port Jervis . . 
Poughkeepsie 
Rensselaer. . . 
Rochester. . . 

Rome 

Schenectady . 
Syracuse. . . . 
Tonawanda. . 

Troy 

Utica 

Watertown. . 
Watervliet . . . 
Yonkers 

Total. . . 



Population 


m 191 


.0 


9 


491 


23 


368 


II 


138 


9 


564 


27 936 


10 


711 


218 


149 


20 


497 


72 


826 


137 


249 


8 


290 


76 


813 


74 419 


26 


730 


15 074 


79 803 



6 727 015 



Volumes 
in free 
libraries 



10 872 
8 837 

11 494 
19 150 

47 338 
7 242 

68 031 
15 652 

25 767 
88 419 

6 841 

48 163 
61 256 

26 095 



31 491 



3 169 256 



Circulation 



26 868 
II 727 

28 284 

45 759 
123 722 

26 794 
42 900 

45 553 
150 742 

275 636 
13 012 
88 638 

186 206 
84 944 

195 076 



17 031 830 



Library 
taxation 
for 191 1 



$1 


500 .. 




750 .. 


2 


514 76 


3 


200 . . 


ID 


740 .. 


I 


000 . . 


10 


000 . . 


I 


500 .. 


10 


000 .. 


40 


500 .. 




450 .. 


6 


500 .. 


24 


000 . . 


7 


000 . . 


12 


500 .. 



$1 521 493 45 



The details for libraries in the greater city of New York are 
also given as follows: 

Volumes and circulation of free lending libraries in New York City 

July I, 1910-June 30, 191 1 



NAME OF LIBRARY 



Boroughs of Manhattan, Bronx and Richmond 
New York Public Library, circulation depart 

ment (43 branches) , 

Young Men's Benevolent Association Library. . . , 

Hudson Guild Library , 

Union Settlement Library , 

Staten Island Academy, New Brighton , 

Riverdale Library , 

Presbyterian Foreign Missions Library , 

Total 

Borough of Brooklyn 

Brooklyn Public Library (29 branches) , 

Pratt Institute Free Library , 

St John's College Library 

St John's Academy Library , 

St Francis College Library 

Total 



VOLUMES 



858 574 
6 092 

748 

871 
641 

491 



2 
I 

4 
3 



10 105 



887 522 



682 646 

loi 819 

13 600 

3 600 

4 270 



805 935 



CIRCULATION 



7 725 945 

32 326 

17 040 

13 009 

5 000 

I 485 
I 106 



7 795 911 



4 066 024 

197 464 

3 650 

3 100 

650 



4 270 888 



70 



NEW YORK STATE LIBRARY 



Volumes and circulation of free lending libraries in New York City 
July I, 19 10 — June 30, 191 1 (concluded) 



NAME OF LIBRARY 


VOLUMES 


CIRCULATION 


Borough of Queens 
Queens Borough Public Library (21 branches) 


139 176 


876 658 


Summary 
Boroughs of Manhattan, Bronx and Richmond. . . 
Boroufifh of Brooklyn 


887 522 

805 935 
139 176 


7 795 911 
4 270 888 


Borou&rh of Oueens 


•^ _ 1 u w v^ w 

876 658 




/ ^-'O^^ 


Total 


I 832 633 


12 04-; 4S7 




7^0 ^Ol 



By the last census the population of the State was 9,113,614. 
Of these, 6,727,015 or 74 per cent live in cities and 4,766,883 or 
52 per cent in the city of New York. The books in free libraries 
are 4,635,716 and, of these, 3,169,256 or 68 per cent are in cities 
and 1,832,633 or 40 per cent are in New York City. The free 
circulation in cities was 17,031,830 or 85 per cent of that of the 
State, an increase for the year of 695,023. The free circulation 
in New York City, outside the school libraries, was 12,943,457, an 
increase for the year of 722,628 and equal to 64 per cent of the 
total for the State. 

The following table shows the percentage of population, of books 
in free circulating libraries, of circulation and of taxation therefor 
in cities and elsewhere. 



New York City . . 

Other cities 

Outside the cities 



POPULA- 
TION 



52% 
22% 
26% 



BOOKS IN 
FREE CIR- 
CULATING 
LIBRARIES 



40% 
28% 

32% 



CIRCULA- 
TION 



64% 

21% 

15% 



TAXATION 



75% 
21% 

4% 



It is altogether natural that library efficiency should show the 
largest results in the great cities. In the country and village dis- 
tricts containing 26 per cent of the people, the total supply of 
books may seem sufficient but the people are scattered, the use of 



REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR I9II 7 1 

the books is much smaller in proportion and the public tax is com- 
paratively slight. Yet we must remember that the village and 
country libraries are maintained largely by unpaid personal service 
and by voluntary contributions. 

STATISTICS OF TAX SUPPORT 

The reports for 191 1 show 299 free libraries which receive aid 
or entire support from local taxation in sums varying from $5 
up to $40,000. The number of libraries thus maintained is 18 
greater than last year. There still remain 190 libraries dependent 
on private gifts. 

In the entire State the public tax for free libraries was 
$1,590*118.26, of which $1,521,493.45 were paid by 40 cities and 
$1,192,790.69 by the city of New York alone. The total tax was 
greater than that of last year by $119,095, of which New York City 
shows an increase of $86,337.54. 

During the year provision has been made by act of the Legis- 
lature for a public 'library system for the city of Rochester. Trus- 
tees have been elected and $10,000 has been appropriated by the 
local authorities. 

There remain nine cities, Cortland, Geneva, Hudson, Ithaca, 
Jamestown, Lackawanna, Newburgh, Oneida and Watervliet, which 
pay no direct tax for free public libraries. Seven of them enjoy 
library facilities provided by schools or by subscription or private 
benevolence. Lackawanna and Watervliet alone among the cities 
are without libraries. 

The free library tax outside of cities was $68,624.81, a gain of 
$7579.12 over that of the previous year. 

LIBRARY BUILDINGS 
1910 

Twelve new library buildings were completed or newly fitted up 
and occupied within the year ending September 30, 1910, as follows : 

Coxsackie, Heermance Memorial Library. . . . February 17, 1910 

Geneseo, Normal School Library February 16, 1910 

Mt Morris Library September 13, 1910 

New York Public Library, Seward Park 

branch November 11, 1909 

Olean Public Library May 21, 1910 

Pleasant Valley Free Library September 16, 1910 



72 NEW YORK STATE LIBRARY 

Portville Free Library December i, 1909 

Sag Harbor, Jermain Memorial Library June 18, 1910 

St Johnsville, Margaret Reaney Memorial 

Library April 29, 1910 

Saranac Lake Free Library... i June i, 1910 

Wellsville, David A. Howe Memorial Library. July 26, 1910 

West Hebron, Hebron Free Library September 27, 1910 

1911 

Ten new buildings have been added to the list within the year 
ending September 30, 191 1, as follows: 

Bolivar Free Library January 

Frankfort Free Library August 

Hornell Public Library March 

Maiden Public Library April 

New York, American Geographical Society. . May 

New York Public Library May 

Richfield Springs Public Library December 

The Sherburne Public Library June 

Theresa Free Library August 

Union Springs, Springport Free Library December 31, 1910 

All of the above is respectfully submitted. 

J. L Wyer, Jr 

Director 



7, 


1911 


15, 


191 1 


27, 


191 1 


23, 


191 1 




191 1 


23, 


191 1 


3, 


1910 


12, 


191 1 


17, 


1911 



REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR I9II 73 



APPENDIXES 



CHAPTER 901, LAWS OF 191 1 

AN ACT providing for the reestablishment of the State Library 
and making an appropriation therefor, and authorizing contracts 
for furnishing the Education Building. 

Became a law October 24, 1911, with the approval of the Governor. Passed, 

three-fifths being present. 

• 

The People of the State of New York, represented in Senate 
and Assembly, do enact as follows: 

Section i The Commissioner of Education is hereby authorized 
and directed, pursuant to the rules of the Regents of the University 
of the State of New York, to take such measures, make such con- 
tracts and incur such traveling and other expenses, not exceeding 
in the aggregate the sum of one million two hundred and fifty thou- 
sand dollars ($1,250,000), as may be necessary to reestablish and 
enlarge the State Library, by gathering suitable books, pamphlets, 
manuscripts and other materials for the reference library, historical 
library, education library, law library, medical library, technological 
library, and the sociological, genealogical and other collections there- 
for, so as not only to restore the loss and remedy the damages to 
the State Library and to the State Museum collections therein 
occasioned by the fire which occurred in the State Capitol on the 
twenty-ninth day of March, 191 1, but also so as to create in the 
course of years a comprehensive State Library which will meet 
the varied needs of the government and the people of the State 
of New York. The said Commissioner of Education shall acquire, 
by purchase or gift, books, pamphlets, manuscripts, records, ar- 
chives, maps, papers and other documents, and relics and museum 
collections to replace, so far as possible, and to add to those 
destroyed or damaged by such fire. He may acquire in like man- 
ner such other property as may be necessary for the reestablishment 
of such Library, and whenever practicable may cause such books, 
manuscripts, pamphlets, records, maps and papers as may have 
been damaged by such fire to be repaired, rebound or treated in 
such other way as he may think well. The said books, pamphlets, 
manuscripts, records, archives, maps, papers and other documents 



74 NEW YORK STATE LIBRARY 

and property thus gathered shall be placed in and become a part 
of the New York State Library. The reestablishment of such 
Library and the acquisition of such books, pamphlets, manuscripts, 
records, archives, maps, papers and other documents and property 
shall proceed under and be subject to the provisions of the Educa- 
tion Law, and the rules and directions of the Regents of the Uni- 
versity of the State of New York, who are the trustees of said 
Library; provided, however, that the Commissioner of Education, 
in making contracts authorized under this section, shall not make 
contracts requiring the payment of money in an amount in excess 
of five hundred thousand dollars ($500,000), prior to October i, 
1913. ThQ sum of fifty thousand dollars ($50,000), or so much 
thereof as may be necessary, which shall be available immediately, 
is hereby appropriated out of any moneys in the State treasury 
not otherwise appropriated, for the purpose of carrying into effect 
the provisions of this section. 

§ 2 The Commissioner of Education is hereby authorized to enter 
into contracts for an amount not to exceed in the aggregate the 
sum of two hundred thousand dollars ($200,000) for such furniture 
and office fixtures as may be necessary for the State Education 
Building and the rooms and offices thereof. 

§ 3 Nothing in this act shall be construed to create a liability 
on the part of the State for the payment of any money except as 
such payment shall be provided for by appropriations made herein 
or hereafter, pursuant to law. 

§ 4 The moneys hereby appropriated shall be expended under 
the direction of the Commissioner of Education in accordance with 
the provisions of the Education Law and the rules of the Regents, 
and shall be paid out on the warrant of the Comptroller in the 
same manner as other moneys appropriated for the use of the 
State Education Department. 

§ 5 This act shall take effect immediately. 



REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR I9II 75 



II 

CHAPTER 521, LAWS OF 1912 

AN ACT making an appropriation for the reestablishment of the 
State Library and for the purchase of furniture and office fixtures 
for the State Educational Building. 

Became a law April 18, 1912, with the approval of the Governor. Pajssed, 

three-fifths being present. 

The People of the State of New York, represented in Senate 
and Assembly, do enact as follows: 

Section i The sum of five hundred thousand dollars ($500,000), 
or so much thereof as may be necessary, is hereby appropriated 
out of any moneys in the State treasury not otherwise appropriated 
for the purpose of carrying into effect the provisions of section i 
of chapter 901 of the Laws of 191 1, entitled "An act providing for 
the reestablishment of the State Library and making an appropria- 
tion therefor and authorizing contracts for furnishing the Educa- 
tion Building," and for the reestablishment and enlargement of the 
State Library and the purchase and acquisition of books, pamphlets, 
manuscripts, records, archives, maps, papers and other documents, 
and relics and museum collections for the said State Library and 
the State Museum, as provided in the said act. 

§ 2 The sum of two hundred thousand dollars ($200,000), or 
so much thereof as may be necessary, is hereby appropriated out 
of any money in the State treasury not otherwise appropriated, for 
the purpose of purchasing such furniture and office fixtures as may 
be necessary for the State Education Building and the rooms and 
offices thereof, for which the Commissioner of Education was au- 
thorized to enter into contracts by section 2 of the said chapter 901 
of the Laws of 1911. 

• •••••••••• 

§ 4 The moneys hereby appropriated shall be expended under 
the direction of the Commissioner of Education in accordance with 
the provisions of the Education Law, and the rules of the Regents 
of the University of the State of New York, and shall be paid 
out on the warrant of the Comptroller in the same manner as other 
moneys appropriated for the use of the Education Department. 

§ 5 This act shall take effect immediately. 



76 NEW YORK STATE LIBRARY 

III 

EDITORIAL COMMENT OF THE STATE PRESS 

The New York State Library will be replaced, so far as possible ; 
of that there is, of course, no question. There is a question, how- 
ever, as to how soon and how it will be done. The Regents and the 
Commissioner of Education, A. S. Draper, urge the Legislature 
to put at their disposal promptly a liberal amount. The Governor 
does the same. We believe the Legislature will grant the request, 
and we know that the great mass of sensible and fairly informed 
people in the State will heartily approve. . . . Thanks to the 
developments of modern times it will be quite practicable to get 
together, from the markets of the world, a library even better 
than the old one for most purposes, and to do it within the next 
two years, at a cost of one million of dollars. The appropriation 
should be made at once. It will be well expended. The work 
is in good hands, competent, energetic, impartial, and faithful. 
The whole Library force, from the Regents and Commissioner 
through all branches, is organized on the merit system. Every 
dollar will be used honestly and to good purpose, and there should 
be no delay in voting the money. The opportunity is so obvious, 
the need is so great, the gain to be had is so incalculable, that to 
defeat the appropriation or to cut it down would be, in effect, a 
wanton waste. — New York Times, April 17, 191 1, 

The Regents have appealed to the Governor and Legislature 
to make an appropriation to begin restoring the State Library, 
partially destroyed in the Capitol fire. What is needed and what 
should be provided is a standing fund so that " advantage may 
be taken of sales of books from time to time." Old and rare books 
can not be otherwise purchased. To replace as many as possible of 
the burned volumes is a matter requiring time, money, expert 
knowledge and enthusiasm. Some of them, and of course many 
priceless manuscripts and records, can never be replaced at all. 
The State is bound in pride and honor to repair, at whatever cost 
may be necessary, the waste due to its carelessness, as far as it 
can be repaired. — New York World, April 8, ipii. 

If putting a lock on the stable door is proverbially too late after 
the horse is stolen, it is certainly fitting to put a new horse in a 
well-locked stable. Despite the destruction of so large a part of 
its Library, New York must continue to maintain a State Library, 
and should make all possible efforts to develop it to even greater 



REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR I9II yy 

dimensions than it had before the fire, and, of course, to house it 
so that it will be as secure as it can possibly be made against a 
recurrence of the late disaster. We would not abate one jot or 
tittle of the righteous indignation which is felt at the lack of 
precautions for the security of the old Library. But that feeling 
should not for a moment stand in the way of prompt, energetic 
and well-directed steps toward replacing the Library so far as 
possible, and developing it according to future opportunities and 
needs. Now, while the losses and the lessons of the great fire 
are fresh in mind, is the time for making adequate provision for 
a new Library in the new and independent structure which is being 
prepared separate from the Capitol. It is estimated that it will 
require more than a million dollars to provide such a Library, but 
it would be the poorest of economy not to make the initial appro- 
priation forthwith. A succession of Legislatures and State govern- 
ments grossly maladministered the construction of the State Capitol. 
The wrongs which were done can never be wholly undone. But 
some compensation to the State can be made and should be made 
by the present Legislature, by providing at once an adequate sum 
for the rehabilitation of the Library which has been so sadly 
marred. — New York Tribune, April p, igii. 

The loss of the State Library is the serious part of the disaster 
by fire at Albany. That part of the Capitol building which was 
injured can be restored. The destruction of books and manuscripts 
which occurred must be made good as far as possible by the 
purchases of duplicates of law and equity reports and by the 
acquisition of the historical documents of the HoUandic and English 
governments of New York from private sources. The further 
work of getting books of general literature can be steadily pursued. 
But the work of negotiation will take time, require patience, and 
is entitled to the best aids of public opinion, and of legislative 
action. . . . The great loss was the Library. The provision of 
another Library on the best terms and in the shortest time possible 
is the great duty before the State. Governor Dix appreciates this, 
and favors the immediate appropriation of a suitable sum to be 
held in readiness for such purchases as the State can make either 
with publishers or by bargains with the owners of large and repre- 
sentative supplies of books which are constantly brought to view 
in the settlement of estates. — Brooklyn Daily Eagle, April lo, ipii. 

But one thing can begin to restore the reputation and self-respect 
of the State of New York and that is to begin immediately to 



78 NEW YORK STATE LIBRARY 

reconstruct the State Library upon broader and stronger founda- 
tions and to make it an even better Library than it was. . . . The 
Governor is thoroughly in sympathy with the request of the Edu- 
cation Department. The Legislature should take prompt and liberal 
action. The people expect it. — Syracuse Post-Standard, April 12, 
ipii. 

It is in the highest degree important that the Library officials 
shall have at their command a large amount of money in order 
that purchases may be made, not only from the catalogs of the 
hundreds of dealers in second-hand books but at the various auc- 
tion sales. ... It is impossible for the director of the State 
Library to apply to the Legislature whenever he sees a book he 
wants; it is essential that a fund shall be provided, to be used at 
his discretion. . . . There should be no hesitation whatever on the 
part of the Legislature to levy a direct tax for the reconstruction 
of the State Library. The people would be glad of the opportunity 
to contribute to this end. Ten cents on each thousand dollars of 
property subject to taxation would bring in one million dollars. 
Who would object to such a trifling tax in order that we might 
have another magnificent State Library within a year ? . . . The 
Library has been of enormous service, and no step to build it up 
and make it what it once was, should be neglected. — Rochester 
Post Express, April 8, igii. 

With a generous supply of money immediately available the 
State Librarian can reconstruct the State Library at once. If there 
be delay, so that advantage can not be taken of the present un- 
paralled opportunities, years will go by before the State can have 
a Library worthy of comparison with that which has been destroyed. 
The Post Express has repeatedly pointed out the manifold ways 
in which the State Library served the people. Commissioner 
Draper takes pains to do that. Any citizen of the State could 
borrow books and have them sent into his home; it was not neces- 
sary to go to Albany. Many thousand readers, students, and 
investigators called upon the trained staff of the Library for help- 
ful suggestions. The Library's correspondence was enormous; it 
was of constant assistance, and it is now the duty of those who 
have received the help of the Library to exert their influence with 
members of the Legislature and urge immediate and generous 
appropriations. . . . The direct tax is inevitable, and the Demo- 
crats should not hesitate to levy it, and the tax should be large 
enough to supply half a million a year for two years for the State 



REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR I9II 79 

Library. A tax of five cents on each $1000 worth of property 
would bring the money.. Is it conceivable that the taxpayers would 
object to a payment so slight as that in order to have one of the 
greatest libraries in the world ? — Rochester Post Express^ April 13, 
ipii. 

The Regents of the State, other officials associated more or less, 
intimately with the educational system and facilities of New York, 
and many public spirited private citizens, are appealing to the 
Governor and the Legislature to take immediate steps to replace 
the part of the destroyed State Library, which can be replaced. 
Much of the loss, it is admitted, is irreparable. . . . But there 
were tens of thousands of volumes destroyed, which, in time, can be 
replaced. Some can still be procured from the publishers or from 
dealers in second-hand books. Others, long out of print, can be 
gradually acquired from the estates of private collectors. It may 
be assumed that the State will proceed as speedily as possible to 
restore the Library, which it has lost through its own carelessness. — 
Rochester Herald, April 10, 1911. 

A thorough, scientific and judicious library for strictly reference 
purposes should be the foundation of the new State Library, which 
of, course the State must have. The leading commonwealth of 
the Union can not do without a worthy Library, and the work 
should be instituted at once. — Saratoga Sun, April 4, ipii. 

It will probably take $1,000,000 adequately to provide for the 
needs of the State Library, but a start should be made this year 
toward that needed work. — Binghamton Herald, April 11, ipii. 

In the three weeks which have passed since the fire in the State 
Capitol a great many people throughout the State engaged in 
various pursuits have become impressed with the necessity of 
replacing the State Library as speedily as possible. The loss of 
the Library was one of the worst features of the fire, and this fact 
has been brought home since the fire not only to the educational 
authorities of the State but to many others who were accustomed 
to make use of it. The necessity for immediate action toward 
giving the State of New York another Library similar to that 
destroyed, it was said yesterday, is to be put right up to the Legis- 
lature by the Board of Regents and Commissioner of Education 
Draper. What they hope to get and get at once is a liberal appro- 
priation which will permit them to begin the work of collecting 
books and records from many quarters to take the place of those 
lost in the fire. Governor Dix, it is said, is ready to back up such 



8o NEW YORK STATE LIBRARY 

a request. The entire cost of collecting a new Library, according 
to some of the educational authorities, will be about $1,000,000. . . . 
As was pointed out by an authority, the State Library was really 
a circulating reference library, a fact of which many people do 
not seem to be aware. Under the system followed books were 
sent out from Albany not only to schools but to individuals who 
had applied for them for purposes of study. A person who was 
making a special study of anything had only to apply to the State 
Library and help would be furnished at once in this manner. In 
this respect the loss of the Library to the communities outside of 
this city has been particularly severe. The State educational 
authorities have no way now of supplying such demands. With 
an immediate appropriation secured a new Library will be started 
at once and housed in the new Education Building, in which it 
was planned to place the old Library. This building is not quite 
completed. While at first glance it would seem almost impossible 
to get together such a library as was destroyed, that is not the case, 
according to the library experts. In two years, they say, it will be 
possible to get together a library even better than the old save in a 
few respects, providing the Legislature liberally provides for the 
work at once. Until that time, however, many persons will have .to 
suspend the studies they were engaged upon at the time the fire 
robbed the State of its Library. — New York Sun, April 18, ipii. 

The citizens of the State are a unit on insisting that the State 
shall appropriate enough money to begin to supply the loss of the 
State Library collections and to push to completion as quickly 
as possible the new building for the Education Department. These 
are the two subjects on which there is and can be no party division 
and on which the people are unanimous. Governor Dix has ap- 
preciated this and has assured the Legislature of the right and 
need of this, and of the demand of the people that this be done. 
Not only is the sentiment universal for this, but the necessity for 
it is absolute. The cause of education must suffer until the new 
Library be secured. Provision to secure it requires a large appro- 
priation immediately to be made. It must be in hand to enable 
purchases at once to be effected, where possible, and further pur- 
chases to be negotiated over as brief a period of time as possible. 
The knowledge of the State officers and their discretion must 
be trusted and will be tested. But to this end they must have 
the money needed. And the money needed must be pledged for 
progressive use. The matter is not optional. It is mandatory. It 



REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR I9II 81 

will not admit of delay. This the Governor, the entire Legislature, 
and all the leaders of political parties can not but realize. The 
Governor can be trusted to employ the resources of his office to 
put this on the road to accomplishment. * . . . Every other duty 
imposed on the Legislature is at least secondary. Every other 
consideration is minor. On education and for education the senti- 
ment of the State and of every party in the State is a unit. Divi- 
sions and distractions have affected the usefulness and impaired the 
record of both parties in the Legislature. That has been on party 
lines and on broken lines in each party. A patriotic opportunity 
is presented to all parties and to all factions in all parties to move 
to the high ground of educational provision. We are glad the 
people and the Governor appreciate this. And we are confident 
the Governor will make the obligation of all the Legislature to all 
the people on this head plain, knowing, as we do, that the people 
will attest to him their hope, and his duty, that he should himself 
make himself the leader, and all other officials his aids, in this 
great crisis of the needs and fame of the people of the State. — 
Brooklyn Daily Eagle, April 17, ipii. 

Dr Draper states with perfect truth that the Library which 
has been all but destroyed was the great instrument of the intel- 
lectual and moral culture of the State, because its collections re- 
lated to every subject and reached out to every interest of the 
Commonwealth, whether moral, professional, commercial or in- 
dustrial. The law library was far broader and richer than the 
ordinary and the same thing was true of those collections in the 
field of medicine, technology, genealogy and even theology. . . . 
The traveling library has been one of the finest features of th€ 
Education Department. When to this is added also the traveling 
volume, so that the student has only to write to Albany for any 
volume that he could not find in his own town, however remote 
he might be from ordinary public libraries, and could get what he 
wanted, it is only fair to say that Dr Draper makes a moderate 
statement of the tremendous loss in the paralysis and stoppage of 
all this library enterprise. The plea is made for not less than a 
million dollars in the next two years for the purpose of restoring 
the Library as far as it may be restored to its former degree of 
usefulness. What has been lost beyond repair or recovery, is lost 
and that is the end of it. But what may be replaced, though it 
will cost money, should be replaced in order that the magnificent 
work of the Library and of the Department may go on with its 



82 NEW YORK STATE LIBRARY 

former vigor and efficiency. . . . The prudence, the economy, 
the sound literary judgment that have united with high adminis- 
trative ability to make the Library so grandly useful are still at 
the command of the State and will continue to be. The Depart- 
ment can be trusted to spend the money wisely if the Legislature 
will appropriate such sum as is necessary. . . . Everyone who is 
proud of the State of New York, everyone who cares for the 
welfare of the children and is concerned for the diffusion of 
knowledge must unite with the Regents and with the Department 
of Education in the hope that Governor Dix sees his way clear to 
such action as shall meet the hopes and the wishes^ of the people 
of the whole State. . . . Incidentally the plea is made for con- 
tribution of every sort of work or curiosity or utensil that needs 
replacing from the Museum of American Antiquities, especially 
those connected with the history of the red men on this continent. 
But that is a detail important in itself and worthy of all con- 
sideration. The main point of this article is to urge that the 
people everywhere join to impress upon the Executive and Legisla- 
ture the very high importance of putting the State Library back into 
its former condition of usefulness. — Buffalo Evening News, 
April 15, ipii, 

A sufficient fund for the purpose of buying books should be 
authorized. The State can not afford to allow its Library to be 
handicapped by unjustified economy in this matter. As nearly as 
it can be done, the Library should be made what it was before. 
It was a source of pride to the State that it had such a splendid 
institution of the kind. The work of restoring it is one that 
ought to have the interest and the support necessary to bring it 
back to its former position. It will require funds to enable the 
work to proceed, and the funds ought to be supplied as generously 
as the necessity warrants. — Schenectady Gazette, April 11, ipii. 

The State now asks for but a single million to make its Library 
what it always has been, a great central depot at the service of 
the citizens of tbe whole State. What would be gained by deny- 
ing to a department devoted to the service of the public and 
equipped with a force of experts, the means of making the State 
Library the great educational treasure-house of the State? . . . 
There is every reason to hope that the present Legislature will see 
to it that the fireproof structure now nearly ready for occupancy 
will not stand with empty shelves. — Poughkeepsie News, April 75, 
T911, 



REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR I9II 83 

IV 

GIFTS RECEIVED MARCH 29 — SEPTEMBER 30, 191 1 

While the following items are for convenience all classified as 
gifts, many of them, especially from libraries, are more properly 
exchanges, as in nearly every case the larger gifts credited to insti- 
tutions were made with the understanding that the New York State 
Library shall in time render an equivalent in kind. However, the 
spirit of the response made to our requests for sets and series to. 
replace those lost in the fire has uniformly been such as to place the 
returns in fact in the class of gifts. 

Only gifts of more than fifty volumes or pamphlets are recorded 
here. Many other similar sendings reached the Library during the 
period covered, which it was impossible to open, to count and to 
acknowledge. These will be covered in future reports. 

VOL. PAM. 

Abbot, Etheldred (Brookline, Mass.) 25 59 

Allen Book & Printing Co. (Troy, N. Y.) 5 67 

American Journal of Insanity (through Dr J. M. 

Mosher, Albany, N. Y.) 102 

American Library Association 52 

Barker, Mrs George F. (Philadelphia) 56 

Bascom, Elva L. (Madison, Wis.) 12 176 

Bendell, Dr Herman (Albany, N. Y.) 168 23 

Berkshire Athenaeum (Pittsfield, Mass.) 53 

Blodgett, Louis A. (Jeflferson, N. Y.) 8 263 

Boston (Mass.) Book Co 25 78 

Boston (Mass.) Public Library 2 533 

Bronson Library (Waterbury, Conn.) 2 88 

Brooklyn (N. Y.) Institute of Arts and Sciences. . . 23 100 

Brooklyn (N. Y.) Public Library 62 

Buchanan, Charles J. (Albany, N. Y.) 525 

Buffalo (N. Y.) Public Library 41 1 18 

Bunnell, Ada (Duluth, Minn.) 3 50 

California University (Berkeley) n 480 

Canada Geological Survey (Ottawa) 13 124 

Cleveland (O.) Public Library 2 76 

CoUen, Judge Frederick • 178 ..... 



84 NEW YORK STATE LIBRARY 

VOL. PAM. 

Columbia University 172 338 

Cornell University 89 

Crissey, Harriet C. (Albany, N. Y.) 189 

District of Columbia Public Library (Washington) 7 207 

Essex Institute (Salem, Mass.) 53 13 

Fay, Lucy E. (Knoxville, Tenn.) i 120 

Green, Samuel A. (Boston, Mass.) 10 107 

Grolier Club (N. Y. City) 14 39 

Harvard University i 26 108 

Hawley, Mary E. (Chicago, 111.) 57 805 

Houghton, Mifflin Co 74 

Idaho State Library 52 

Indiana Public Library Commission ■ 8 88 

Jacksonville (Fla.) Free Public Library 5 358 

Johns Hopkins University 24 34 

Knapp, S. H. (Albany, N. Y.) 191 

Lacy, Alice (Albany, N. Y.) 50 ' 

Loeb, William (Albany, N. Y.) 145 

Maar, Charles (Delmar, N. Y.) 689 

Macdonald, Dr W. G.— Estate (Albany, N. Y.) . . i 886 

Macmillan Co 148 

Manchester (Eng.) Museum 51 

Maryland Geological Survey 51 

Massachusetts Historical Society (Boston) 51 

Massachusetts State Library 160 3 

Meadville (Pa.) Theological School 4 202 

Medford (Mass.) Public Library 3 122 

Montana Secretary of State 62 

Morse, Anna L. ( Youngstown, O.) 24 112 

Mosher, Dr. J. Montgomery (Albany, N. Y.) 3 95 

Munich (Ger.) Technical High School 107 

New Hampshire State Library 59 

New York State Agriculture Department 63 54 

New York State Board of Charities i 145 i 318 

New York State Charities Aid Association i 105 

New York State Insurance Department 429 17 

New York State, Secretary of State 59 

North Carolina Geological Survey ^ 51 



REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR I9II 85 

VOL. PAM. 

Oberlin College (Oberlin, O.) 24 45 

Ohio State Library 103 4 

Osterhout Library (Wilkes-Barre, Pa.) 266 

Palmer, Dr F. A. (Mechanicville, N. Y.) 56 .695 

Parker, Iva (Albany, N. Y.) 63 

Pennsylvania Legislative Reference Bureau 214 

Pennsylvania State Library 'jy 

Perkins Institution for the Blind (Boston) 206 i 

Philadelphia Free Library ', 4 167 2 

Pittsburgh (Pa.) Carnegie Library 30 66 

Providence (R: I.) Athenaeum 6 172 

Providence (R. I.) Public Library i 132 

Putnam, Dr F. W. (Binghamton, N. Y.) 8 364 

Queens Borough (N. Y.) Public Library 350 105 

Ray, Frances K. (Albany, N. Y.) ' 60 

Rhoades, Nina (New York City) 53 

Roberts, Ethel D. (.Wellesley, Mass.) i 70 

Rosenthal's, Ludwig, Antiquariat (Munich, Ger.) . . i 98 

Rush, C. E. (St Joseph, Mo.) i 139 

St Louis (Mo.) Public Library 140 

Salem (Mass.) Public Library 8 46 

Sheldon, Helen G. (Shepard, O.) 4 256 

Smock, John C. (Hudson, N. Y.) 121 

Solis-Cohen, Leon M. (New York City) 229 

South Dakota Secretary of State 66 22 

Springfield (Mass.) City Library Association 3 245 

Streeter, Fanny E. (Berlin, N. Y.) 89 

Strong, Frances A. (Albany, N. Y.) 227 40 

Texas State Library 8 48 

Thompson, H. M. (Laurel, Md.) 8 221 

Toledo (O.) Public Library 200 140 

Tucker, Luther (Albany, N. Y.) 155 113 

U. S. Department of Agriculture 13 204 

U. S. Superintendent of Documents 104 677 

U. S. Library of Congress 23 62 

Van Benthuysen, Charles & Sons (Albany, N. Y.) . 15 602 

Vermont Board of Library Commissioners 8 158 

Vitz, Carl P. P. (Cleveland, O.) 66 



*. 



86 NEW YORK STATE LIBRARY 

VOL. PAM. 

West Virginia University (Morgantown) 87 

Wheeler, Everett P. (New York City) 129 92 

Wheeler, Martha T. (Albany, N. Y.) 98 16 

Williams College 18 169 

Wilmington Institute Free Library 2 376 

Wisconsin Free Library Commission 174 

Wisconsin State Library 65 

Wisconsin University (Madison) 7 79 

Woodworth, Florence (Albany, N. Y.) 47 72 

Worcester (Mass.) Free Public Library. 76 

Wright, Mrs Anna R. (Manila, P. L) 12 199 

Wyoming State Library 76 

Yale University Library 5 277 



12 516 16 847 



INDEX 



Accession book, 37-38 

Acts providing for reestablishment of 

State Library, 47, 73-74, 75 
Appropriations, 46-47, 73-75 

Blind, library for, 44-45 

Books, saved from the fire, 9; pur- 
chases, 47-51 ; gifts, 83-86 

Buildings, the new Education Build- 
ing, 51-52; library, 71-72 

Catalog, temporary, 36 

Cataloging, 40-44 

Charters granted to new libraries, 58- 

62 
Classification, 39-40 
Consolidated index, 36-37 

Dictionary catalog, 40 
Dutch records, 31-32 

Eastman, W. R., Educational exten- 
sion, 55-72 

Editorial comment on destruction of 
State Library, 76-82 

Education Building, 51-52 

Educational Extension, Division of, 
55-72 

Field work. Educational Extension 

Division, 63 
Fire, destruction of State Library by, 

7-9; editorial comment on, 76-82 

Gifts received, 83-86 



Legislation, 46-47. 73-75 

Librarians since establishment of the 

Library, 6 
Library School, 53-54 
Library staff, 6 
Losses and salvage, 9 

[8/] 



Manuscripts, saved from the fire, 
10-14; Library publications burned, 
15-16; list of principal sets prior to 
fire, 16-19; records and papers in 
manuscripts room, 19-31 ; Dutch 
records, 31-32; restoration, 33-34 

New State Library, 46-52 

New York City, volumes and cir- 
culation of free lending libraries, 
69-70 

New York Libraries, 64 

New York State Library School, 53- 

54 
Order and accession work, 36-38 

Press comment on destruction of 
State Library, 76-82 

Registration of libraries, 58-62 

Reorganization, 32-46 

Reports from libraries, summaries, 

66-71 
Round table meetings, 64 

Salvage, 9 

Scope of collections, 47-51 

Session laws, indexing and editing, 

45-46 

Staff, library, 6 

Stokes, L N. Phelps, account of ef- 
forts to save manuscripts, 11-13 

Tax support, statistics, 71 
Temporary quarters, 32 
Transfers of library property, 59, 61 
Traveling libraries, 56, 64-66 

van Laer, A. F., account of efforts to 
save manuscripts, 11 

Walter, Frank K., New York State 
Library School, 53-54 



Supplements 1-2 

1 Best books of 191 1 

2 25th annual report of New York State Library School, 191 1 



Education Department Bulletin 

Published fortnightly by the University of the State of New York 

Entered as second-class matter June 24. 1908, at the Post Office at Albany, N. Y., under 

the act of July 16, 1894 



No. 520 



ALBANY. N. Y. 



June i, 1912 



New York State Library 



Bibliography 51 



BEST BOOKS OF 1911 



PAGE 

Prefatory note 3 

Reference books 6 

Philosophy and ethics 7 

Religion 8 

Sociology 10 

Education 14 

Customs and folklore 14 

Natural science 15 

Useful arts 17 

Public and personal health 19 

Agriculture , 20 

Fine arts 21 

Gardens and gardening; city plan- 
ning 22 



PAGE 

Music 23 

Amusements and sports 24 

Essays etc 25 

Anthologies and poetry 26 

Drama , 27 

Description and travel 27 

History 34 

Biography 35 

Fiction 40 

Children's books 47 

Fairy and folk tales 50 

Biography for children 51 

Children's stories 51 

Index 55 



Education Department fiulletin 

Published fortnightly by the University of the State of New York 

Entered as second-class matter June 24, 1908, at the Post Office at Albany, N. Y. under 

act of July 16, 1894 - 

No. 520 ALBANY, N. Y. June i, 191 2 

New York State Library 

Bibliography 51 



A SELECTION FROM THE 

BEST BOOKS OF 191 1 

WITH NOTES 



PREFATORY NOTE 
To the Librarian: . 

This is an annotated list of 250 books published in 191 1, selected 
by the New York State Library and recommended to the public 
libraries of the State. To aid in choosing small collections of new 
books three classes are indicated: books marked a, of which there 
are 20, are suggested to libraries which must confine their additions 
within narrow limits; 30 others marked b are also proposed to 
libraries that can buy 50 books ; and 50 marked c may be added to 
a and h to make up 100 books. The remaining 150, including some 
reference books and a few more costly publications, are worthy 
careful consideration by libraries that can buy more than 100 books 
and by those wishing to enlarge resources in special subjects. 
Many of the unmarked works are of the highest merit. 

It is of course impossible for any board to determine which 
.100 or 200 books are absolutely the best; still less could it make 
a selection which would fit the needs of every small library in 
the State. Books marked c may be a in value in certain cases. 
The best general advice may, and sometimes should, be rejected 
in view of actual needs, and the librarian should of course be 
better able to determine such needs than a distant board of ad- 
visers. 



4 NEW YORK STATE LIBRARY 

Considerable doubt exists in the minds of those responsible for 
the list, whether these markings are of practical value to libraries, 
and unless there is some expression in favor of retaining the plan, 
the letters will probably be dropped next year. Expression of indi- 
vidual opinion, for or against, from those using the list will be 
welcomed. 

It is thought best to inform the smaller libraries about some books 
which would be of high practical value to them, though probably 
too expensive to be bought from the ordinary fund. Special cir- 
cimistances may sometimes justify buying such a work at the sacri- 
fice of several cheaper ones. Occasionally, too, some generous 
friend or local club expresses a wish to make a town library a sub- 
stantial gift. If the librarian can make prompt and definite sug- 
gestions it is an advantage to the community, and the satisfaction 
of the benefactor is materially increased. 

We can not too strongly emphasize the advice which we have 
for several years quoted in full from the Journal of New Jersey 
Libraries, October 1903: Do not buy subscription books; avoid 
books issued in parts; ask advise before purchasing expensive 
reprints. 

• 

Finest Orations, Noblest Essays, Royal Flint Flams, Huge Anthologies, 
and the like all come to the secondhand man. Get them of him, if you must. 
In a small library they are generally almost useless. In subscription books, 
cases like this are not uncommon. Maspero wrote several large and learned 
volumes, in French, on Egypt and Chaldea. They were translated and pub- 
lished in three or four volumes in England, costing libraries in this country 
about $5 each. An American publisher reprints them in 12 small volumes 
with a few additional colored cuts, on heavier paper and in larger type 
and offers them through agents for $84 — and libraries buy them ! 

Do not buy " sets " 9r complete editions of authors. Buy the volumes you 
need and as you need them. A complete set always includes several volumes 
you do not need. Specify the edition you wish of standard books when 
you can, unless you find a bookseller able and willing to select them wisely 
for you. 

While this list has been prepared with special reference to 
smaller public libraries it will also be of much service to schools. 
Not all the books listed, however, are recommended for school 
use. There are some books in fiction which have not enough 
positive value either as literature or as a spur to historical study 
to justify their purchase for a school, yet which serve a legiti- 
mate purpose in the public library by providing wholesome enter- 
tainment for a very different class of readers. All titles under the 
heading ''Children's books" are recommended for those school 
libraries which undertake to provide wholesome entertainment as 
well as useful information. 



BEST BOOKS OF I9II 5 

In accordance with the statement in the preface of the Ten- 
tative selection, only the more popular type of book dealing with 
technical subjects has been recommended here. Libraries in need 
of more advanced technical literature will find the annual list pre- 
pared by the applied science department of Pratt Institute Free 
Library, Brooklyn, entitled Technical Books of ipii, sent free on 
application, a most valuable aid. 

This list, like its predecessors since 1897, has been prepared 
under the general direction of Martha T. Wheeler of the State 
Library staff. 

J. I. Wyer, Jr 

Director 

Albany, July 13, ipi2 



NEW YORK STATE LIBRARY 



REFERENCE BOOKS 

370.3 Monroe, Paul & others, A cyclopedia of education. 

5v. v.i-2. Macmillan $5 n ea. 

11-1511 Aims to give information on every division of educational prac- 

tice. Completeness of treatment is not designed. Completeness 
of scope is attempted. Articles are by specialists and are pro- 
vided with short bibliographies and a good system of cross refer- 
ences. Emphasis is on American subjects and utilitarian educa- 
tion. Binding and typography are satisfactory. 

V. I Annals of Amer. Acad. 38:308; Dial, 50:349; Educ. Rev. 
42:421; Nation, 92:481. 

V. 2 Annals of Amer. Acad. 40:273; Elem. Sch. Teacher, 
12:240; Nation, 93:606. 

371-365 b Schauffler, R. H. comp. Memorial day (Decoration 

day). (Our Amer. holidays) Moffat $1 n 

11-6709 Anthology of poetry and prose dealing with the Civil War and 

representing both sides. Most are short selections suitable for 
children's recitation in school celebrations. 

Mrs N. U. Wallington's American history by American poets 
(Duffield, 2v. $1.50 nea. 811.08) is an anthology of poems on 
American history arranged chronologically by events treated. 
11-9932 They range from the discovery to the Hudson-Fulton celebration. 
Indexes and historical notes. Few are of high quality but the 
collection will be useful. 

SchaufHer, N. Y. Times Rev. 16:322, May 21, '11. 

Wallington, Dial, 50:450; Lit. Digest, 42:1212. 

383 c Phelps, E. M. comp. Selected articles on the parcels 

post. (Debaters' handbook ser.) H. W. Wilson $1 n 

1 1-35968/4 Like other volumes of the series contains a brief, a bibliography, 
chiefly of periodical references, and reprinted articles, each in 
three divisions, general, affirmative and negative. 

In the same series E. C. Robbins's Selected articles on the open 
versus closed shop (33i»88) is the same in plan, but E. D. Bul- 

ii~35969 lock's Selected articles on child labor (331.3) is intended for the 
general reader rather than the debater and contains a classified 

11-29058 bibliographv of the subject and reprints of 28 articles designed to 
cover all phases of the problem. 

603 Hopkins, A. A. ed. The Scientific American cyclopedia 

of formulas. Munn $5 n 

11-409 Practically a new book although it includes about 30 per cent 

of the material in the 28th edition of the Scientific American 
cyclopedia of receipts, notes and queries, increased to 15,000 
formulas by up-to-date selections from American and foreign 
technical periodicals. Classified arrangement and index. 
Engin. Record, 63 :23i ; Lit. Digest, 42 :4i3. 

620.8 b Merriman, Mansfield & others, ed. American civil 

engineers' pocket book. Wiley $5 

11-1327 Valuable reference book, written by experts in the subjects 

covered. More convenient and up to date than the present edition 

of Trautwme. Good index. 

808.5 Robbins, E. C. The high school debate book. 

McQurg $1 n 



BEST BOOKS OF IQII ^ 

11-30808 After practical introductory advice on the value of debating 
and method of preparing briefs, 18 subjects are considered. For 
each, negative and affirmative briefs and references are given, as 
in the Debaters' handbook volumes, which already cover six of 
these subjects. This book does not give reprints of articles, but 
references are limited to books and periodicals easily available. 

910.4 Baedeker, Karl. The Mediterranean; a handbook for 

travellers. Scribner $3.60 n 

11-28378 Important addition to the separate volumes on the Mediter- 
ranean countries, in part based on them, comprising chiefly infor- 
mation about sea routes, seaport and some inland towns, Madeira, 
the Canary islands, and coasts of Morocco, Algeria and Tunisia. 
38 maps and 49 plans. 

A11-2011 J. E. C. Fitch's Mediterranean moods (Button $4 n, 914.67) 
consists of gracefully written, vivid impressions of the Balearic 
isles and Sardinia, embracing life of people, scenery and note- 
worthy incidents of travel, i color plate, 2 maps and 32 half- 
tones. 

Flitch, Dial, 51:96; N. Y. Times Rev. 16:538, Sept. 10, '11; 
Sat. R. 111:717; Spec. 106:448, Mar. 25, '11. 

911 Shepherd, W. R. Historical atlas. (Amer. historical 

ser.) Holt $2.50 

12-35091 Serviceable, well-proportioned work partly based on Putzger's 
Historischer schulatlas, but especially planned for American 
schools and colleges. Well-executed historical maps from 1450 
B. C. to present. Full index of towns. 

Maps 12-5 Ramsay Muir's New school atlas of modem history (Holt 
$1.25 n) has the same aim but more limited scope, 120 maps cover- 
ing European history from 395 A. D. to the present, with maps 
to show the possessions of European countries. Has also text 
giving outline of the period covered and index of countries only. 

A 1 1-2574 J« G- Bartholomew's Literary and historical atlas of America 
(Everyman's lib. Button 35cn, (91 1.7) gives in compact 
form physical, historical and modern maps of North and 
South America, a few plans of battles, a chapter on coinage, 
gazetteer of places having a literary and historic interest and index 
of towns. Decidedly useful, though- less satisfactory than the 
corresponding volume on Europe. About 100 maps and plans. 
Shepherd, Amer. Hist. Rev. 17:&76; Nation, 94:544. 
Muir, Ath. 191 1, 1:69; Independent, 71:260. 



PHILOSOPHY AND ETHICS 
H3 c Bergson, H. L. Creative evolution. Holt $2.50 n 

11-3948 Brilliant and original work, aiming to show that the evolutions 

of life and of intelligence are interdependent. An important con- 
tribution to the study of the subject, in parts difficult reading but 
full of interest even to those without scientific training. Patrick 

11-18828 Geddes & J. A. Thomson's Evolution (Home univ. lib. Holt 50c 
n, 575) is a short, popular outline of the principal theories of evolu- 
tion, with a history of their development to the present day. 
Bibliography. J. W. Judd's Coming of evolution (Cambridge 
manuals of sci. and lit. Putnam 40c n, 575) is a brief but interest- 

11-19211 ing sketch of the gradual shaping of the theory of evolution in 
the minds of Lyell, Darwin and other scientists, the expression of 
it in their works and its influence upon science. Illustrations from 
portraits. 



8 JHEW YORK STATE LIBRARY 

Bergson, Ath. 191 1, 1:411; Dial^ 51:253; Nation, 92:648; 
Nature, 87 :475. 

Geddes, Ath. 1911, 2:18. 

Judd, Ath. 1910, 2:705; Nature, 85:297; Spec. 106:652, Apr. 
29, 'II. 

123 c Palmer, G. H. The problem of freedom. 

Houghton $1.25 n 

11-29828 Lowell Institute lectures discussing the ancient problem of fate 
and free will. Scholarly, impartial in viewpoint and lucid in ex- 
pression. 

Dial, 52:399; N. Y. Times Rev. 17:127, Mar. 10, *I2. 

170 Dawson, W. J. The book of courage. Revell $1.25 n 

11-27326 Sympathetic, inspiring essays on the cultivation of a brave spirit 
in meeting the vicissitudes of life — failure, lost friendships, sud- 
den tragedy, leaving familiar things, ill-health, bereavement, old 
age, etc. 

N. Y. Times Rev. 16:632, Oct. 22, *ii; Outlook, 99:391, Oct 
14, 'II. 

170 b Vorse, Mrs M. M. H. Autobiography of an elderly 

woman. Houghton $1.25 n 

11-26626 The half-humorous, half -sorrowful complaints and confessions 
of a grandmother who finds herself wrapped in the cotton- wool 
of her children's mistaken kindness and laid on the shelf, with her 
intellect as active and her zest for living as keen as ever. The 
book will appeal to elderly women and should open the eyes of 
too devoted, lovingly despotic daughters. A. L, A. Booklist 
Nation, 94:90; N. Y. Times Rev. 16:787, Dec. 3, '11; Outlook, 
99 :43i. 

172 Abbott, Lyman. America in the making. (Yale lectures 

on the responsibilities of citizenship) 

Yale Univ. $1.15 n 

11-10765 Five addresses which display breadth of view and practical as 
well as idealistic and stimulating qualities. They describe prevail- 
ing conditions, point out political, economic, social and religious 
problems, and declare that the solution lies in a realization of the 
principles of Christian brotherhood, justice, mercy and reverence. 

RELIGION 

See also Children's books, pp. 47, 51 

207 c Hodges, George. The training of children in religion. 

Applet on $1.50 n 

11-10757 Discusses practically from viewpoint 9f liberal theology, sub- 
jects of vital importance in religious training of children under 
fifteen, as the being, nature and manifestation of God, prayer, the 
Bible, silent instruction of example, the use of Sunday, qualifica- 
tions of a Sunday school teacher, etc. See also note on his 
Child's guide to the Bible under Raymont, following. 

Lit. Digest, 42:1014; N. Y. Times Rev. 16:355, June 4, '11. 

220 b Raymont, Thomas. The use of the Bible in the edu- 

cation of the young. Longmans $1.25 n 

E12-119 Valuable handbook for teachers, parents and students, present- 

ing for the first time a complete survey of the Bible as a means 



1 



BEST BOOKS OF I9II 9 

of religious instruction, from the double viewpoints of modern 
Biblical research and modern pedagogy. 
12-17 Designed for young people, but useful also to teachers and 

parents is Dean George Hodges's Child's guide to the Bible 
(Doubleday $1.20 n), which treats briefly and simply of scope, 
literary forms, progress of the Bible and history of Israel and 
apostolic Christianity. 10 reproductions of paintings. 

Raymont, Biblical World, 38:434; Independent, 71:1040. 
Hodges, Independent, 72:1067; N. Y. Times Rev. 17:178, Apr. 
31, '12. 
220 . 52 Paris, J. T. The romance of the English Bible. 

Westminster Press 25c 

11-8093 Slender little book telling in a brief, simple, vivid way the 

Bible's stormy history from the days of the manuscripts to the 
American revised version, 1901. 

Ai 1-2376 Another useful little introduction to the subject is John Brown's 
History of the English Bible (Cambridge manuals of sci. and lit. 
Putnam 40c n), somewhat more ambitious, fuller on the personal 
side and in picturesque details, but less satisfactory in connecting 
with the earlier history and in neglecting to allude to the Ameri- 
can revised version. 

11-13348 A. W. Pollard's Records of the English Bible (Oxford Univ. 
$2.50 n), a highly valuable book for scholars and students, col- 
lects 63 original documents, previously unpublished or not easily 
accessible, relating to the making, printing and publishing of the 
English translations of the Bible, from Tyndale's New Testa- 
ment of 1525 to the version of 161 1. An introduction (75p. pre- 
sents a history of these translations. 
Brown, Sat. R. 111:784. 

Pollard, Amer. Jour, of Theol. 15:484; Ath. 191 1, 1:470; Out- 
look, 98:80; Spec. 106:651, Apr. 29, '11. 

230 Hodges, George. Everyman's religion. 

Macmillan $1.50 n 

11-26625 Interesting interpretation of the vital elements and practice of 
Christianity. Its simplicity, liberality and reasonableness will ap- 
12-9635 peal to the average man. 

Rudolf Eucken's The truth of religion (Theological transla- 
tion lib., Putnam $3 n, 201) is a brilliant and valuable work deal- 
ing speculatively but reverently with the significance of religion 
to the whole of life, and concluding that while Christianity meets 
all spiritual needs, its transient and human accretions must be 
separate4 from its divine and eternal elements. 
Hodges, Biblical World, n. s. 38:434. 
Eucken, Ath. 1912, i :334; Outlook, 100: 701, Mar. 23, '12. 

232 c Clarke, W. N. The ideal of Jesus. Scribner $1.50 n 

11-22395 Unfolds the ideal of Jesus for human life and applies it to the 
kingdom of God, righteousness, the filial life, liberty, justice, 
wealth, the church etc. A deeply spiritual appreciation emanating 
from mature Christian experience. 

Ath. 1911, 2:554; Bibhcal World, n. s. 38:425; Independent, 
71 :i268. 

261 a Butterfield, K. L. The country church and the rural 

problem. (Carew lectures, Hartford Theological 

Seminary, 1909) Univ. of Chic. $1 n 

1 1-204 1 Short but suggestive treatment, clearly stating the American 

rural problem and the part which can be taken by the churches 
and the churches only, in its solution. Suggests remedies for the 



'% i^'^f >'Z ' ^"TL -.r^a-.iirr 



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t^ 5^^ ^ Civ;>6t. Jr. J. '' -cr-'-'^/i-x ^r-jii'^nti Hiasfnuir Si a 

^^ y//»'// ,^-^>''*,- -y r ',.<; ',- '>*»: ^:k.^ ',\ \z 'r^ rut:^ n S-i;w Tick Titr. 

<f,A ;♦ . ;,<^*' /,f ;,^j */; ./;,*-'/*i *r,;',h unf'/.di and dcrcic^ ^c spirit 
//,*rf 4U fiA *4*// v:f^,?,,%*Ar''4 I'/f ti^ instead of profi- Tbotight- 
^^/v/v>r,f,^ s«'f;»,vK,/ jif,'| ^^^**ia^*;y#r, thotwrh readers wiH disagree 

*' / l,ff,*^ \'* /, '/, ^44, ()fi, 22, *n; Nation, f^-M^- 
y/j^t n Mf//Wrt, F. K, *\\] Ur'u\f\y'\ pfeud. Through the mill. 

Pilgrim Press Si. 35 n 

U ^y^^U \nffifif, iitiiip)tf' tt'.trrul'iv*' i(ivinK in autot/iV^jfraphic form the cx- 
\tn^*^iitn^ 0I AU \'.uv\nh )tffy <ti U:n bnnjght to New England by 
rt /|m»mPm» fMM k iiU'S Hnn\ nmi workin$( for years in a cotton mill 
Ut titw iUfUorf\ i',n\urf(t'(\ itdm articles in Outlook. 
\nn\, ",4 41', ifuiVntU, */r^4t'f Survey, 27:1346. 

^^1 .H a Living without a bosu, A. Harper $1 n 

M 4^h4H thi^'tt'dintu n;in;i»ivr of a rity newspaper man who unex- 
itnittWy r»'M'iv«^* "Ihr Mill* envelop/' and starts life again with 
hU w)f»* )f» H kitiuU villJiK*', With a capital of $8 
M coMh ♦ fiilJM't'; fiM«l i»iitialJve he heef>mes a self- 
Mi 44 »MtMI 



i 1 



$800 and courage, 
If-respecting busi- 

<-l^| AiioMur 4|«»»v. Will r;irlH<»irM 0»<» 7</av out (Small $1.20 n) 



l'4fi» thtMl 

Aiioilur 4|«»»v, Will (''Ar]v\^m'H One ivay 
|M 1)4 Willi ilir- KAWW pruhleiii a clerk wit 



n|M 1)4 Willi ihr- «»«tMr pfuhleiii a clerk without a position — but 



BEST BOOKS OF I9II 



IT 



offers another solution, more novel and detailed but less attractive: 
The clerk emigrating with his family to the slums, wins his way 
to independence through hard work, study and thrift. 

Living tuithout a boss. Independent, 71 766 ; N. Y. Times Rev. 
167^, Dec 3, 'II. 

Carleton, Nation, 92:320; N. Y. Times Rev. 1676, Feb. 12, '11 ; 
Outlook, 97:514; Survey, 26:276. 

331.8 Streightoff, F. H. The standard of living among the 

industrial people of America. (Hart, Schaffner and 
Marx prize essays in econ.) Houghton $i n 

11-8117 An attempt to show the living conditions of America's working 

class, summarizing with the aid of charts and statistical tables 
the results of recent trustworthy investigations in regard to un- 
emplo)rment, incomes, housing, food, clothing, thrift, health, in- 
tellectual and social life. Useful to social workers and econo- 
mists. Bibliography. 

1 1-23370 Making both ends meet by Mrs S. A. Clark and Edith Wyatt 
(Macmillan $1.50 n) describes in sympathetic but unimpassioned 
style, personal investigations initiated by the National Consumers' 
League, of the income and outlay of New York working girls 
employed in shops, laundries and factories and living away from 
home. 

ii~i3739 L. M. Bosworth's The living wage of women workers (Sup- 
plement to Annals of Amer. Acad, of jPolit. and Soc. Sci. 
pap, 7Sc) presents the results of a similar investigation into the 
income and expenditure of 450 Boston wage-earning women. 
More valuable than Making both ends meet through its interpre- 
tations, summaries and tables. 

Streightoff, Amer. Econ. Rev. 1:618; Cath. World, 93:395; 
Nation, 92:607; Survey, 27:1010. 

Qark & Wyatt, Lit Digest, 43:581; Outlook, 99:880, Dec. 9, 
'11; Survey, 27:1577, Jan. 13, '12. 

Bosworth, Jour, of Polit. Econ. 20:538 May '12; Survey, 
V'^Sn, Jan. 13, '12. 

331.86 Solenberger, A, W. One thousand homeless men; a 

study of original records. (Russell Sage foundation 

pub.) Charities Pub. Com. $1.25 

11-13151 Author was in charge of central district of Chicago Bureau of 
Charities 1900-4, and gives an interesting and valuable analysis 
and discussion of the records "of applicants, bearing on the 
causes of homelessness, characteristics of the homeless, their in- 
dividual treatment, their environment and the social remedies." 
Author's death prevented a summing up and conclusion. Ap- 
pendixes ^ve the material in tabular form, account of the 
cheap lodging houses of Chicago and short treatment of the home- 
less men of Minneapolis. Index. 

Amer. Econ. Rev. 1:884; Annals of Amer. Acad. 38:958; Dial, 
51:109; N. Y. Times Rev. 16:401, June 25, '11. 

335 a Skelton, O. D. Socialism ; a critical analysis. (Hart, 

Schaffner and Marx prize essays in econ.) 

Houghton $1.50 n 

11-5216 One of the clearest and most logical presentations of the case 

against socialism that has yet been made (1911). Author's wide 
reading, keen power of analysis and criticism, brilliant epigram- 
matic style, and sense of humor have combined to produce a work 
of great value and interest. The bibliography is the best that has 



12 



NEW YORK STATE LIBRARY 



yet been published. /. L. LeRossignol in Jour, of Polit. Econ. 
19:798. 

Cath. World, 93:395; Nation, 93^44^; Survey, 26:562. 

336 . 24 Seligman, E. R. A. The income tax. Macmillan $3 

11-2522 Thorough and scholarly study, historical and economic, of the 

establishment and results of the income tax in England and 
European countries and of the eflForts to achieve similar ends in 
this country. Full bibliography. 

Amer. Econ. Rev. i :862; Amer. Hist Rev. 16:820; Dial, Ji :i96; 
Nation, 92:481. 

337.3 Tarbell, I. M. The tariflf in our times. 

Macmillan $1.50 n 

11-26206 Readable, popular history of American tariff bills from the 
Morrill bill of i860 to the Payne-Aldrich bill of 1909, surveying 
their ethical, personal, economic and political aspects and asserting 
that they have never fairly embodied public opinion. 

Nation, 93:499; N. Y. Times Rev. 16:847, Dec 24, '11; Spec 
108:912, June 8, '12. 

338.8 Wyman, Bruce. Control of the market; a legal solution 

of the trust problem. Moffat $1.50 n 

11-30803 A clear exposition of the author's theory that "all businesses 
which have a virtual monopoly" are public businesses and subject 
to control by the state; therefore he advocates regulation of the 
trusts by law rather than the attempt to destroy them. Author, 
professor of law at Harvard. 

Annals of Amer. Acad. 41 :354 \ Jour, of Polit. Econ. 20 :425 ; 
N. Y. Times Rev. 17:115, Mar. 3, '12. 

352 Bradford, E. S. Commission government in American 

cities. (Citizen's lib. of economics, politics and sociol.) 

Macmillan $1.25 n 

11-30432 Useful, popular introduction, sketching history from beginnings 
of movement in Galveston, 1901, to adoption by 150 cities in 191 1, 
and considering modifications, advantages and objections. 

ii~23372 In City government by commission, ed. by C. R. Woodruff 
(National Municipal League ser. Appleton $1.50 n) are timely, 
able papers by W. B. Munro, E. S. Bradford, Rear-admiral Chad- 
wick, A. B. Hart and others, written for the National Municipal 
League. Editor contributes 10 admirable chapters on history, 
principles, results etc 

11-32243 Thirty scholarly, valuable essays by E. S. Bradford, J. A. 
Fairlie, D. F. Wilcox, R. S. Childs, and others, are contained in 
Commission government in American cities (Amer. Acad, of 
Polit. & Soc. Sci. $1.50, pap. $1). Grouped under Underlying prin- 
ciples and typical plans. Problems, Objections, limitations and 
modifications, Results in typical cities. 

Bradford, Engin. News, 67:^22, Feb. 15, *I2; N. Y. Times Rev. 
17:243, Apr. 21, '12. 

Woodruff, Annals of Amer. Acad. 38:968; Dial, 51:347; Engin. 
News, 66:sup. p. 31, Oct. 12, '11; N. Y. Times Rev. 16:588, Oct 
I, '11. 

Commission government, Engin. News, 67:322, Feb. 15, '12. 

353.7 c Williams, Henry. The United States navy. 

Holt $1.50 n 

11-28288 Clearly written handbook answering simply and briefly the 
questions constantly asked about the navy's history, organization, 



BEST BOOKS OF I9II I3 

personnel, classes of ships, explosives, the designing and building 
of warships, etc. Author, naval constructor, United States navy. 
Illustrated by halftone photographs and diagrams. 

355 Angell, Norman, pseud, (R. N. A. Lane). The great 

illusion; a study of the relation of military power in 
nations to their economic and social advantage. 

Putnam $1.50 n 

11-25728 A study of military power, to prove that prosperity is not the 
result of successful wars or preparation for them. Brilliant if 
not always economically sound in argument. Enlarged from the 
pamphlet Europe's optical delusion. 

11-2235 H. M. Chittenden's War or peace (McClurg $1 n, 172.4) is a 

sane and comprehensive statement, by an American army officer, 
of the disadvantages of war. Neither of these books advises 
present disarmament but each looks toward extended federation 
of nations to secure future peace. 

11-2052 J. Novicow*s IVar and its alleged benefits (Holt $1 n, 172.4) 

takes up one after another the supposed arguments in favor of 
war and disproves them with a theatrical violence sometimes un- 
convincing but always interesting. 

All, Dial, 50:301; N. Y. Times Rev. 16:138, Mar. 12, '11; Out- 
look, 97:771. 

Angell, Amer. Econ. Rev. i :349 ; Annals of Amer. Acad. 37 .766, 
Chittenden, Annals of Amer. Acad. 37:753; Bellman, io:5fe 

362.5 c Johnson, Alexander. The almshouse: construction 

and management. (Russell Sage foundation pub.) 

Charities Pub. Com. $1.25 

11-13148 Very practical, readable, friendly little volume, treating prob- 
lems of location, capacity, construction, administration, and care 
of inmates, including chapters on care of sick and mentally de- 
fective. Ought to be in the hands of every superintendent of the 
poor, county supervisor, official inspector or voluntary visitor. 

Survey, 26:626, July 29, '11 
Appendixes (100 p.), illustrations from photographs and plans. 
Amer. Econ. Rev. 1:883, I^^c. '11; Annals of Amer. Acad. 
38:946, Nov. '11. 

396 Schreiner, Olive. Woman and labour. Stokes $1.25 n 

1 1-7240 Eloquent plea for the opening of all fields of activity to women, 

that their deplorahle state of economic parasitism upon men may 
be counteracted and humanity in general benefited. Fragment, 
though complete in itself, of a more ambitious work destroyed 
during the Boer war. 

Ath. loii, 2:214; Bookman, 33:425; Dial, 50:470; Independent, 
70:959; Polit. Sci. Q. 26:576; Survey, 26:839. 

396.3 b Allen, W. H. Woman's part in government whether 

she votes or not. Dodd $1.50 n 

11-29421 Opportune book aiming to incite study of and practical interest 
in municipal and social betterment and efficient democracy. Its 
pungent, epigrammatic questions and statements are challenging, 
suggestive and stimulating to men as well as women. 

Bookman, 34:43i; Nation, 94:65; N- Y. Times Rev. 16:848, 
Dec. 24, '11; North Amer. Rev. I95*i30; Survey, 27:1581. 



14 NEW YORK STATE LIBRARY 



EDUCATION 

374 c Wright, H. P. From school through college. 

Yale Univ. $i n 

11-26957 Seven addresses giving sane and helpful advice to college stu- 
dents from experience gained in twenty-five years as dean of 
Yale. 

374.1 Bloomfield, Meyer. The vocational guidance of youth. 

(Riverside educ. monographs) Houghton 60c n 

1 1-543 1 Sketches movement for vocational education in all countries 

and development of the profession of vocational counselor. Most 
space is given to the Vocation Bureau of Boston, of which the 
author is director, being successor to the late Frank Parsons, 
whose detailed account of the bureau's methods in Choosing a 
vocation (1909) this supplements. Bibliography. 
Survey, 26:464. 

376 Briggs, Le B. R. Girls and education. Houghton $1 n 

11-26497 Four addresses to school or college girls, marked by common 
sense, broadmindedness and humor. 
N. Y. Times Rev. 16:800, Dec. 3, '11. 

CUSTOMS AND FOLKLORE 

See also Children's books, p. 47, 50 

390 c Skeat, W. W. jr. The past at our doors. (Readable 

bks in natural knowledge) Macmillan 50c n 

12-39010 An interesting little book pointing out survivals of old customs 
in modern English food, dress and homes, thus giving both the 
evolution of modern fashions and a picture of ancient domestic 
life. Illustrated. 

Ath. 191 1, 1:331; Nature, 86:379. 

398.2 Gregory, Augusta, lady. The Kiltartan wonderbook. 

Button $1.50 n 

Ai 1-834 Sixteen quaintly told stories from Irish folklore, taken down 
literally from the lips of old people. Amusing colored plates 
seem intended for children, who would enjoy hearing many of 
the stories. 

398.2 RoUeston, T. W. The high deeds of Finn, and other 

bardic romances of Ireland. Crowell $1.50 n 

A11-2181 Sixteen tales arranged in a rough, chronological order under the 
three divisions, Bardic romances, High deeds of Finn, The his- 
tory of King Cormac. Stopford A. Brooke's long introduction is 
interesting and informing. Hardly a child's book, but material 
may be useful to story-tellers. 

11-35874 Author's Myths and legends of the Celtic race (Crowell $2.50 n) 
is essentially a popular source book of early Celtic history, re- 
ligion, mythical and romantic literature, displaying marked evi- 
dences of research and an excellent literary style. Illustrated. 
Glossary and index. 

Myths and legends, Dial, 51:482; Nation, 93:581; N. Y. Times 
Rev. 16:716, Nov. 12, '11. 



BEST BOOKS OF I9II 



15 



523.8 



II-IO399 



II-31153 



II-26192 



550 



12-3901 I 



570.4 

11-5205 



570.4 

A11-2531 



AlI-2008 



NATURAL SCIENCE 

See also Children's books, p. 47-48 

Proctor, Mary. Half hours with the summer stars. 

McClurg 75c n 

Supplies a need not met by most popular star books in giving 
the mythology connected with the heavenly bodies and quoting 
descriptions by poets. 

This is done in much fuller and more scholarly fashion in 
W. T. Olcott's Star lore of all ages (Putnam $3.50 n, 523), a 
sumptuous volume with 50 text illustrations and 64 plates. 

Proctor, Dial, 50:450; N. Y. Times Rev. 16:337, May 28, '11. 

Olcott, Dial, 51:484; Nation, 94:117; N. Y. Times Rev. 17:2, 
Jan. 7, '12. 

Duncan, R. K. Some chemical problems of to-day. 

Harper $2 n 

Untechnical discussion of recent achievements and future pos- 
sibilities of chemical discovery, especially in relation to industrial 
methods. Treats subjects as diverse as theories of the origin ot 
the universe, the manufacture of bread and artificial camphor. 

Independent, 71:1074; Lit. Digest, 43:862; N. Y. Times Rev. 
16:719, Nov. 12, '11; Spec. 107:967, Dec. 2, '11. 

c Cole, G. A. J. The changeful earth; an introduction 

to the record of the rocks. (Readable bks in natural 

knowledge) Macmillan 50c n 

A little book explaining, often picturesquely, the earth's phy- 
sical changes, past and now proceeding, through the action of 
rain, rivers, earthquakes etc. Illustrated. 
Ath. 191 1, 2:394. 

a Sharp, D. L. The face of the fields. 

Houghton $1.25 n 

Nine pleasing essays, full of humor and the love of nature, 
reflecting author's intimate acquaintance with his Massachusetts 
farm. Contains Turtle eggs for Agassiz, The scarcity of skunks, 
John Burroughs etc- Mainly reprinted from the Atlantic. 

Nation, 92:403; N. Y. Times Rev. 16:248, Apr. 23, '11. 

Thomson, J. A. The biology of the seasons. 

Holt $2.75 n 

A scientist's delightful appreciation and interpretation of th6 
seasonal phenomena and phases of animal and plant life. Though 
allusions are to English scientific terms and conditions, and study 
does not aim at completeness, its indirect presentation of evolu- 
tionary doctrine, poetic and scientific insight, and attractive diction 
will appeal to American readers. 12 color prints tipped on dark 
mounts. 

J. L. Hancock's iVa/ttr^ sketches in temperate America (Mc- 
Clurg $2.75 n) consists of readable essays on plant, insect and 
bird life, discussing evolution, habits, protective resemblance, mim- 
icry, warning colors, adaption, ecology etc. 215 original draw- 
ings in text and 12 colored plates by author. 

Thomson, Ath. 1911, 2:18; Dial, 51 -531 ; Nation, 93:376; Spec. 
I07:349» Sept. 2, '11. 

Hancock, Independent, 70:1224; Lit. Digest, 43:214. 



1 6 NEW YORK STATE LIBRARY 

570.7 b Comstock, Mrs A. B. Handbook of nature-study. 

Comstock Pub. $3.25 

11-26779 Bulky, useful book for teachers and parents, based on Cornell 
nature-study leaflets, revised, with additional materiaL Contains 
about 250 interesting lessons giving elementary instruction on 
animal and plant life and in study of earth and sky. Fully illus- 
trated with halftone photographs and drawings. Bibliography. 
Lit. Digest, 44:26, Jan. 6, '12. 

575.6 Kellicott, W. E. The social direction of human evolu- 

tion. Appleton $1.50 n 

11-10955 Sets forth the most recent (1911) principles of eugenics. A 
concise, clear, elementary and at the same time, comprehensive 
discussion of the problems of heredity as related to the human 
race. Based on three lectures delivered at Oberlin, 191 0. 

Survey, 27:1241, Nov. 18, *ii 
12-1073 The problem of race-regeneration (New tracts for the times, 

Moffat 50C n) by Haverlock Ellis is a sympathetic little interpre- 
tation of the movement of social reform, pointing out that the 
practical success of eugenics depends on the development of the 
individual conscience. 

Kellicott, Annals of Amer. Acad. 38:952, Nov. '11; Jour, of 
Polit. Econ. 19:605, July '11; Science, n. s. 34:316,. Sept. 8, '11. 
Ellis, Survey, 28:106. 

580 Nuttall, G. C. Wild flowers as they grow; photo- 

graphed in color direct from nature by H. E. Corke. 

Cassell $1.25 

Ii~27545 Twenty-five brief, pleasantly informing essays on the constitu- 
tion and habits of as many English wild flowers (in this country 
many are cultivated), each accompanied by diagrams and an ex- 
ceptionally beautiful colored plate. 

A 1 1-2062 F. A. Bards well's Herb garden (Color books, Macmillan $2 n, 
635) is a charming book if only for the 16 exquisite reproduc- 
tions of water colors. The text combines practical and experi- 
enced advice for planting, with curious information as to ancient 
superstitions and uses. 

Nuttall, Ath. 1911, 1:336; Sat. Rev. iii:sup. Mar. 25, '11, p. 3. 
Bardswell, Ath. 191 1, i :545. 

582 Seton, E. T. The forester's manual. (Scout manual 

ser.) Doubleday $1 n 

12-6047 Popular handbook describing without use of botanic terms, 

other than scientific name, 100 of the best known native timber 
trees of eastern North America. For each tree, besides the brief 
description, there is an easily recognizable picture of the leaf and 
fruit and a map showing habitat. 

590 Roberts, C. G. D. Neighbors unknown. 

Macmillan $1.50 

11-846 Fourteen graphic stories of animal and bird life in the deep 

forests of upper Canada, all illustrating the general law that 
every animal is the prey of another stronger and wiser. 

A, L. A. Booklist 
Dial, 50:438; Nation, 92:400; N. Y. Times Rev. 16:364, June 
II, '11. 



BEST BOOKS OF I9II 



17 



It 



USEFUL ARTS 

See also Children's books, p. 48 

608 c Corbin, T. W. Mechanical inventions of to-day. 

Lippincott $1.50 n 

ii~35979 Short, well-illustrated chapters giving clear popular descrip- 
tions of modern inventions and the principles upon which they 
are based. Deals with railway, coal mine and cotton mill devices, 
steam turbines, the lathe, dredge etc. 

Acad. 81:538; Spec. 107:834, Nov. 18, 'n. 

622 b Husband, Joseph. A year in a coal-mine. 

Houghton $1.10 n 

ii'^PQiS Straightforward, detailed and sometimes thrilling narrative of 

the experiences of a young Harvard graduate working a^ a 

laborer in a large soft-coal mine. Appeared in Atlantic Monthly. 

Dial, 50:3^57; Nation, 93^38; N. Y. Times Rev. 16:291, May 

17, 'II. 

629 . 2 Booth, C. E. " Gideon Harris,'' pseud. & others. 

AudeVs answers on automobiles, for owners, oper- 
ators, repairmen; by Gideon Harris and associates. 

Audel $1.50 

11-22345 Presents in the form of short, concise questions and answers, 
information on operation, care and maintenance, with special at- 
tention to principles of carburetters and ignition, and chapters on 
the storage battery, motor cycles, electric vehicles, overhauling the 
car, etc. Indexed, and illustrated by diagrams. 

629.4 c Kaempffert, W, B. The new art of flying. 

Dodd $1.50 n 

ii-ioogo- An untechnical, up-to-date treatment explaining the principles 
of dynamic flight and aeroplane construction, using as examples 
only those machines which have been in a measure standardized. 
Glossary, diagrams and illustrations from photographs. 

Lit. Digest, 43:364; Nation, 93:295; N. Y. Times Rev. 16:335. 
May 28, '11. 

641. 1 Olsen, J. C. Pure foods. Ginn 80c 

11-22864 Textbook or popular reference work discussing the function, 
composition and cost of all varieties of food and giving simple 
tests for the detection of adulteration. Illustrated. 

11-23711 E. A. Locke's Food values (Appleton $1.25 n) prepared for 
students in the Harvard Medical School, consists chiefly of useful 
and accurate tables giving the comparative composition and nu- 
tritive value of common American foods, raw and cooked. 

12-5533 J. A. Murray's Economy of food (Appleton $1.50 n) is a more 

general work, first describing the nutrition required by the body, 
then taking up the comparative nutritive values of foods and diets. 
Terms and prices are English. 

Olsen, Cath. World, 94:253; Nation, 93:475. 

641.58 a Soyer, Nicolas. Soyer's paper-bag cookery. 

Sturgis 60c n 

11-19603 Describes author's new method of cooking by which, in many 
processes, ordinary cooking utensils are replaced by specially pre- 



10 NEW YORK STATE LIBRARY 

difficulties besetting country ministers and urges need of good 
men in this work. The rural church and community betterment 
compiled by the Y. M. C. A. International Committee (Ass*n Press 
11-13748 $1) gives the minutes and addresses of the Rural Church Confer- 
ence held in New York, December 1910, and although reaching no 
definite conclusion contains many suggestions. 

Butterfield, Amer. Jour, of Sociol. 17:125; Nation, 92:426. 
Y. M. C. A., Outlook, 98: 1013. 

261 King, H. C. The moral and religious challenge of our 

times. Macmillan $1.50 n 

11-31945 Sympathetic, inspiring, concise survey and interpretation of the 
new movements .of modern life, offering reverence for person- 
ality as the guiding and determining principle in all human 
progress. 

SOCIOLOGY 

See also Children's books, p. 47 

324.73 c Childs, R. S. Short-ballot principles. Houghton $in 

11-25692 Breezy, clear-headed exposition of the advantages of a ballot 
so short that voters can inform themselves concerning each candi- 
date and of the benefits of the commission plan in city govern- 
ment. 

Educ. Rev. 42:523; N. Y. Times Rev. 16:620, Oct. 15, '11; Out- 
look, 99:362. 

325.26 Ovington, M. W. Half a man. Longmans $1 n 

11-16291 Interesting study of the status of the negro in New York City, 
his housing, sanitary and moral conditions, children, means of live- 
lihood, effects of race prejudice, etc., published under the super- 
vision of the Greenwich House Committee on Social Investiga- 
tions. 

Amer. Jour, of Sociol. 17:414, Nov. '11; Annals of Amer. Acad. 
38:947, Nov. 'ii; Dial, 5^-^37', Nation, 93'424; N. Y. Times Rev. 
16:422, July 2, '11; Survey, 26:760, Aug. 26, '11. 

331 Henderson, C. H. Pay-day. Houghton $1.50 n 

11-26201 Proposes as a solution of the problem of social regeneration, 
the alliance of an education which unfolds and develops the spirit 
with an industry administered for use instead of profit. Thought- 
provoking, graphic and persuasive, though readers will disagree 
with author s Utopian theories and conclusions. 

N. Y. Times Rev. 16:644, Oct. 22, '11; Nation, 94:411. 

331 .8 Brown, F. K. "Al Priddy ", pseud. Through the mill. 

Pilgrim Press $1.35 n 

11-23520 Simple, graphic narrative giving in autobiographic form the ex- 
periences of an English boy of ten brought to New England by 
a drunken uncle and aunt and working for years in a cotton mill 
in New Bedford. Enlarged from articles in Outlook. 
Dial, 52:21; Outlook, 99:341; Survey, 27:1346. 

.33f .8 a Living without a boss, A. Harper $1 n 

11-23028 Interesting narrative of a city newsuaper man who unex- 
pectedly receives "the blue envelop," and starts life again with 
his wife in a small village. With a capital of $800 and courage, 
resourcefulness and initiative he becomes a self-respecting busi- 
ness man. 

n-35154 Another story. Will Carleton's One way out (Small $1.20 n) 
opens with the same problem — a clerk without a position — but 



1 



BEST BOOKS OF I9II 



IT 



offers another solution, more novel and detailed but less attractive : 
The clerk emigrating with his family to the slums, wins his way 
to independence through hard work, study and thrift. 

Living without a boss, Independent, 71 766 ; N. Y. Times Rev. 
16:7^, Dec. 3, '11. 

Carleton, Nation, 92:320; N. Y. Times Rev. 16:76, Feb. 12, '11; 
Outlook, 97:514; Survey, 26:276. 

331.8 Streightoff, F. H. The standard of living among the 

industrial people of America. (Hart, Schaffner and 
Marx prize essays in econ.) Houghton $i n 

11-8117 An attempt to show the living conditions of America's working 

class, summarizing with the aid oi charts and statistical tables 
the results of recent trustworthy investigations in regard to un- 
employment, incomes, housing, food, clothing, thrift, health, in- 
tellectual and social life. Useful to social workers and econo- 
mists. Bibliography. 

11-23370 Making both ends meet hy Mrs S. A. Clark and Edith Wyatt 
(Macmillan $1.50 n) describes in sympathetic but unimpassioned 
style, personal investigations initiated by the National Consumers' 
League, of the income and outlay of New York working girls 
employed in shops, laundries and factories and living away from 
home. 

ii~i3739 L. M. Bosworth's The living wage of women workers (Sup- 
plement to Annals of Amer. Acad, of Polit. and Soc. Sci. 
pap. 75c) presents the results of a similar investigation into the 
income and expenditure of 450 Boston wage-earning women. 
More valuable than Making both ends meet through its interpre- 
tations, summaries and tables. 

Streightoff, Amer. Econ. Rev. 1:618; Cath. World, 93:395; 
Nation, 92:60^; Survey, 27:1010. 

Qark & Wyatt, Lit Digest, 43:581; Outlook, 99:880, Dec. 9, 
'11; Survey, 27:1577, Jan. 13, '12. 

Bosworth, Jour, of Polit. Econ. 20:538 May '12; Survey, 
^ '^577, Jan. 13, *I2. 

331.86 Solenberger, A. W. One thousand homeless men; a 

study of original records. (Russell Sage foundation 

pub.) Charities Pub. Com. $1.25 

11-13151 Author was in charge of central district of Chicago Bureau of 
Charities 1900-4, and gives an interesting and valuable analysis 
and discussion of the records " of applicants, bearing on the 
causes of homelessness, characteristics of the homeless, their in- 
dividual treatment, their environment and the social remedies." 
Author's death prevented a summing up and conclusion. Ap- 
pendixes give the material in tabular form, account of the 
cheap lodging houses of Chicago and short treatment of the home- 
less men of Minneapolis. Index. 

Amer. Econ. Rev. 1:884; Annals of Amer. Acad. 38:958; Dial, 
51:109; N. Y. Times Rev. 16:401, June 25, '11. 

335 a Skelton, O. D. Socialism ; a critical analysis. (Hart, 

Schaffner and Marx prize essays in econ.) 

Houghton $1.50 n 

11-5216 One of the clearest and most logical presentations of the case 

against socialism that has yet been made (1911). Author's wide 
reading, keen power of analysis and criticism, brilliant epigram- 
matic style, and sense of humor have combined to produce a work 
of great value and interest. The bibliography is .the best that has 



12 



NEW YORK STATE LIBRARY 



yet been published. /. L. LeRossignol in Jour, of Polit. Econ. 
19 :798. 

Cath. World, 93:395; Nation, 93^44^; Survey, 26:562. 

336 . 24 Seligman, E, R. A. The income tax. Macmillan $3 

11-2522 Thorough and scholarly study, historical and economic, of the 

establishment and results of the income tax in England and 
European countries and of the eflForts to achieve similar ends in 
this country. Full bibliography. 

Amer. Econ. Rev. i :862; Amer. Hist. Rev. 16:820; Dial, Ji 1196; 
Nation, 92:481. 

337.3 Tarbell, I. M. The tariflf in our times. 

Macmillan $1.50 n 

11-26206 Readable, popular history of American tariff bills from the 
Morrill bill of i860 to the Payne-Aldrich bill of 1909, surveying 
their ethical, personal, economic and political aspects and asserting 
that they have never fairly embodied public opinion. 

Nation, 93:499; N. Y. Times Rev. 16:847, Dec. 24, '11; Spec. 
108:912, June 8, '12. 

338 . 8 Wyman, Bruce. Control of the market ; a legal solution 

of the trust problem. Moffat $1.50 n 

11-30803 A clear exposition of the author's theory that "all businesses 
which have a virtual monopoly" are public businesses and subject 
to control by the state; therefore he advocates regulation of the 
trusts by law rather than the attempt to destroy them. Author, 
professor of law at Harvard. 

Annals of Amer. Acad. 41:354; Jour, of Polit. Econ. 20:425; 
N. Y. Times Rev. 17:115, Mar. 3, '12. 

352 Bradford, E. S. Commission government in American 

cities. (Citizen's lib. of economics, politics and sociol.) 

Macmillan $1.25 n 

11-30432 Useful, popular introduction, sketching history from beginnings 
of movement in Galveston, 1901, to adoption by 150 cities in 191 1, 
and considering modifications, advantages and objections. 

11-^3372 In City government by commission, ed. by C. R. Woodruff 
(National Municipal League ser. Appleton $1.50 n) are timely, 
able papers by W. B. Munro, E. S. Bradford, Rear-admiral Chad- 
wick, A. B. Hart and others, written for the National Municipal 
League. Editor contributes 10 admirable chapters on history, 
principles, results etc. 

11-32243 Thirty scholarly, valuable essays by E. S. Bradford, J. A. 
Fairlie, D. F. Wilcox, R. S. Childs, and others, are contained in 
Commission government in American cities (Amer. Acad, of 
Polit. & Soc. Sci. $1.50, pap. $1). Grouped under Underlying prin- 
ciples and typical plans, Problems, (Objections, limitations and 
modifications, Results in typical cities. 

Bradford, Engin. News, 67:322, Feb. 15, '12; N. Y. Times Rev. 
17:243, Apr. 21, '12. 

Woodruff, Annals of Amer. Acad. 38:968; Dial, 51:347; Engin. 
News, 66:sup. p. 31, Oct. 12, '11; N. Y. Times Rev. 16:588, Oct. 
I, '11. 

Commission government, Engin. News, 67:322, Feb. 15, '*i2. 

353 . 7 c Williams, Henry. The United States navy. 

Holt $1.50 n 

11-28288 Clearly written handbook answering simply and briefly the 
questions constantly asked about the navy's history, organization, 



BEST BOOKS OF I9II I3 

personnel, classes of ships, explosives, the designing and building 
of warships, etc. Author, naval constructor, United States navy. 
Illustrated by halftone photographs and diagrams. 

355 Angell, Norman, pseud, (R. N. A. Lane). The great 

illusion; a study of the relation of military power in 
nations to their economic and social advantage. 

Putnam $1.50 n 

11-25728 A study of military power, to prove that prosperity is not the 
result of successful wars or preparation for them. Brilliant if 
not always economically sound in argument. Enlarged from the 
pamphlet Europe's optical delusion, 

11-2235 H. M. Chittenden's War or peace (McClurg $1 n, 172.4) is a 

sane and comprehensive statement, by an American army officer, 
of the disadvantages of war. Neither of these books advises 
present disarmament but each looks toward extended federation 
of nations to secure future peace. 

11-2052 J. Novicow's IVar and its alleged benefits (Holt $1 n, 172.4) 

takes up one after another the supposed arguments in favor of 
war and disproves them with a theatrical violence sometimes un- 
convincing but always interesting. 

All, Dial, 50:301; N. Y. Times Rev. 16:138, Mar. 12, '11; Out- 
look, 97:771. 

Angell, Amer. Econ. Rev. i :349 ; Annals of Amer. Acad. 37 .766, 
Chittenden, Annals of Amer. Acad. 37.753; Bellman, 10:562. 

362.5 c Johnson, Alexander. The almshouse: construction 

and management. (Russell Sage foundation pub.) 

Charities Pub. Com. $1.25 

11-13148 Very practical, readable, friendly little volume, treating prob- 
lems of location, capacity, construction, administration, and care 
of inmates, including chapters on care of sick and mentally de- 
fective. Ought to be in the hands of every superintendent of the 
poor, county supervisor, official inspector or voluntary visitor. 

Survey, 26:626, July 29, *ii 
Appendixes (100 p.), illustrations from photographs and plans. 
Amer. Econ. Rev. 1:883, Dec. '11; Annals of Amer. Acad. 
38:946, Nov. '11. 

396 Schreiner, Olive. Woman and labour. Stokes $1.25 n 

11-7240 Eloquent plea for the opening of all fields of activity to women, 

that their deplorable state of economic parasitism upon men may 
be counteracted and humanity in general benefited. Fragment, 
though complete in itself, of a more ambitious work destroyed 
during the Boer war. 

Ath. loii^ 2:214; Bookman, 33:425; Dial, 50:470; Independent, 
70:959; Polit. Sci. Q. 26:576; Survey, 26:839. 

396.3 b Allen, W. H. Woman's part in government whether 

she votes or not. Dodd $1.50 n 

11-29421 Opportune book aiming to incite study of and practical interest 
in municipal and social betterment and efficient democracy. Its 
pungent, epigrammatic questions and statements are challenging, 
suggestive and stimulating to men as well as women. 

Bookman, 34:43i; Nation, 94:65; N- Y. Times Rev. 16:848, 
Dec. 24, '11; North Amer. Rev. 195:130; Survey, 27:1581. 



14 NEW YORK STATE LIBRARY 



EDUCATION 

374 c Wright, H. P. From school through college. 

Yale Univ. $i n 

11-26957 Seven addresses giving sane and helpful advice to college stu- 
dents from experience gained in twenty-five years as dean of 
Yale. ^ 

374.1 Bloomfield, Meyer. The vocational guidance of youth. 

(Riverside educ. monographs) Houghton 60c n 

1 1-543 1 Sketches movement for vocational education in all countries 

and development of the profession of vocational counselor. Most 
space is given to the Vocation Bureau of Boston, of which the 
author is director, being successor to the late Frank Parsons, 
whose detailed account of the bureau's methods in Choosing a 
vocation (1909) this supplements. Bibliography. 
Survey, 26:464. 

376 Briggs, Le B. R. Girls and education. Houghton $1 n 

11-26497 Four addresses to school or college girls, marked by common 

sense, broadmindedness and humor. 
N. Y. Times Rev. 16:800, Dec. 3, '11. 

CUSTOMS AND FOLKLORE 

See also Children's books, p. 47, 50 

390 c Skeat, W. W. jr. The past at our doors. (Readable 

bks in natural knowledge) Macmillan 50c n 

12-39010 An interesting little book pointing out survivals of old customs 
in modern English food, dress and homes, thus giving both the 
evolution of modern fashions and a picture of ancient domestic 
life. Illustrated. 

Ath. 1911, 1:331; Nature, 86:379. 

398.2 Gregory, Augusta, lady. The Kiltartan wonderbook. 

Button $1.50 n 

Ai 1-834 Sixteen quaintly told stories from Irish folklore, taken down 
literally from the lips of old people. Amusing colored plates 
seem intended for children, who would enjoy hearing many of 
the stories. 

398.2 Rolleston, T. W. The high deeds of Finn, and other 

bardic romances of Ireland. Crowell $1.50 n 

A11-2181 Sixteen tales arranged in a rough, chronological order under the 
three divisions, Bardic romances. High deeds of Finn, The his- 
tory of King Cormac. Stopford A. Brooke's long introduction is 
interesting and informing. Hardly a child's book, but material 
may be useful to story-tellers. 

ii~35874 Author's Myths and legends of the Celtic race (Crowell $2.50 n) 
is essentially a popular source book of early Celtic history, re- 
ligion, mythical and romantic literature, displaying marked evi- 
dences of research and an excellent literary style. Illustrated. 
Glossary and index. 

Myths and legends, Dial, 51:482; Nation, 93:581; N. Y. Times 
Rev. 16:716, Nov. 12, '11. 



BEST BOOKS OF I9II 



15 



523.8 



II-IO399 



II-31153 



II-26192 



550 



12-3901 I 



570.4 

11-5205 • 



570.4 

A11-2531 



AlI-2008 



NATURAL SCIENCE 

See also Children's books, p. 47-48 

Proctor, Mary. Half hours with the summer stars. 

McClurg 75c n 

Supplies a need not met by most popular star books in giving 
the mythology connected with the heavenly bodies and quoting 
descriptions by poets. 

This is done in much fuller and more scholarly fashion in 
W. T. Olcott's Star lore of all ages (Putnam $3.50 n, 523), a 
sumptuous volume with 50 text illustrations and 64 plates. 

Proctor, Dial, 50:450; N. Y. Times Rev. i6:^Z7y May 28, '11. 

Olcott, Dial, 51:484; Nation, 94:117; N. Y. Times Rev. 17:2, 
Jan. 7, '12. 

Duncan, R. K. Some chemical problems of to-day. 

Harper $2 n 

Untechnical discussion of recent achievements and future pos- 
sibilities of chemical discovery, especially in relation to industrial 
methods. Treats subjects as diverse as theories of the origin ot 
the universe, the manufacture of bread and artificial camphor. 

Independent, 71:1074; Lit. Digest, 43:862; N. Y. Times Rev. 
16:719, Nov. 12, '11; Spec. 107:967, Dec. 2, '11. 

c Cole, G. A. J. The changeful earth; an introduction 

to the record of the rocks. (Readable bks in natural 

knowledge) Macmillan 50c n 

A little book explaining, often picturesquely, the earth's phy- 
sical changes, past and now proceeding, through the action of 
rain, rivers, earthquakes etc. Illustrated. 
Ath. 191 1, 2:394. 

a Sharp, D. L. The face of the fields. 

Houghton $1.25 n 

Nine pleasing essays, full of humor and the love of nature, 
reflecting author's intimate acquaintance with his Massachusetts 
farm. Contains Turtle eggs for Agassiz, The scarcity of skunks, 
John Burroughs etc- Mainly reprinted from the Atlantic, 

Nation, 92:403; N. Y. Times Rev. 16:248, Apr. 23, *ii. 

Thomson, J. A. The biology of the seasons. 

Holt $2.75 n 

A scientist's delightful appreciation and interpretation of th6 
seasonal phenomena and phases of animal and plant life. Though 
allusions are to English scientific terms and conditions, and study 
does not aim at completeness, its indirect presentation of evolu- 
'tionary doctrine, poetic and scientific insight, and attractive diction 
will appeal to American readers. 12 color prints tipped on dark 
mounts. 

J. L. Hancock's Nature sketches in temperate America (Mc- 
Clurg $2.73 n) consists of readable essays on plant, insect and 
bird life, discussing evolution, habits, protective resemblance, mim- 
icry, warning colors, adaption, ecology etc. 215 original draw- 
ings in text and 12 colored plates by author. 

Thomson, Ath. 191 1, 2:18; Dial, 51:531; Nation, 93:376; Spec. 
107:349, Sept. 2, '11. 

Hancock, Independent, 70:1224; Lit. Digest, 43:214. 



1 6 NEW YORK STATE LIBRARY 

570.7 b Comstock, Mrs A. B. Handbook of nature-study. 

Comstock Pub. $3.25 

11-26779 Bulky, useful book for teachers and parents, based on Cornell 
nature-study leaflets, revised, with additional material. Contains 
about 250 interesting lessons giving elementary instruction on 
animal and plant life and in study of earth and sky. Fully illus- 
trated with halftone photographs and drawings. Bibliography. 
Lit. Digest, 44:26, Jan. 6, '12. 

575.6 Kellicott, W. E. The social direction of human evolu- 

tion. Appleton $1.50 n 

11-10955 Sets forth the most recent (1911) principles of eugenics. A 
concise, clear, elementary and at the same time, comprehensive 
discussion of the problems of heredity as related to the human 
race. Based on three lectures delivered at Oberlin, 191 o. 

Survey, 27:1241, Nov. 18, *ii 
12-1073 The problem of race-regeneration (New tracts for the times, 

Moffat 50C n) by Haverlock Ellis is a sympathetic little interpre- 
tation of the movement of social reform, pointing out that the 
practical success of eugenics depends on the development of the 
individual conscience. 

Kellicott, Annals of Amer. Acad. 38:952, Nov. '11; Jour, of 
Polit. Econ. 19:605, July '11; Science, n. s. 34:316,. Sept. 8, '11. 
Ellis, Survey, 28:106. 

580 Nuttall, G. C. Wild flowers as they grow; photo- 

graphed in color direct from nature by H. E. Corke. 

Cassell $1.25 

ji~2754S Twenty-five brief, pleasantly informing essays on the constitu- 
tion and habits of as many English wild flowers (in this country 
many are cultivated), each accompanied by diagrams and an ex- 
ceptionally beautiful colored plate. 

A 1 1-3062 F. A. Bards well's Herb garden (Color books, Macmillan $2 n, 
63s) is a charming book if only for the 16 exquisite reproduc- 
tions of water colors. The text combines practical and experi- 
enced advice for planting, with curious information as to ancient 
superstitions and uses. 

Nuttall, Ath. 1911, 1:336; Sat. Rev. iii:sup. Mar. 25, '11, p. 3. 
Bardswell, Ath. 191 1, 1:545- 

582 Seton, E. T. The forester's manual. (Scout manual 

ser.) Doubleday $1 n 

12-6047 Popular handbook describing without use of botanic terms, 

other than scientific name, 100 of the best known native timber 
trees of eastern North America. For each tree, besides the brief 
description, there is an^ easily recognizable picture of the leaf and 
fruit and a map showing habitat. 

590 Roberts, C. G. D. Neighbors unknown. 

Macmillan $1.50 

11-846 Fourteen graphic stories of animal and bird life in the deep 

forests of upper Canada, all illustrating the general law that 
every animal is the prey of another stronger and wiser. 

A. L. A. Booklist 
Dial, 50:438; Nation, 92:400; N. Y. Times Rev. 16:364, June 
II, '11. 



^n 



BEST BOOKS OF I9II 



17 



USEFUL ARTS 

. See also Children's books, p. 48 

608 c Corbin, T. W. Mechanical inventions of to-day. 

Lippincott $1.50 n 

ii~35979 Short, well-illustrated chapters giving clear popular descrip- 
tions of modern inventions and the principles upon which they 
are based. Deals with railway, coal mine and cotton mill devices, 
steam turbines, the lathe, dredge etc. 

Acad. 81:538; Spec. 107:834, Nov. 18, '11. 

622 b Husband, Joseph. A year in a coal-mine. 

Houghton $1.10 n 

11-9915 Straightforward, detailed and sometimes thrilling narrative of 

the experiences of a young Harvard graduate working as a 

laborer in a large soft-coal mine. Appeared in Atlantic Monthly. 

Dial, 50:357; Nation, 93:38; N. Y. Times Rev. 16:291, May 

17, 'II. 
629 . 2 Booth, C. E. " Gideon Harris," pseud. & others. 

Audel's answers on automobiles, for owners, oper- 
ators, repairmen; by Gideon Harris and associates. 

Audel $1.50 

1 1-22345 Presents in the form of short, concise questions and answers, 
information on operation, care and maintenance, with special at- 
tention to principles of carburetters and ignition, and chapters on 
the storage battery, motor cycles, electric vehicles, overhauling the 
car, etc. Indexed, and illustrated by diagrams. 

629.4 c Kaempffert, W. B. The new art of flying. 

Dodd $1.50 n 

11-10090 An untechnical, up-to-date treatment explaining the principles 
of dynamic flight and aeroplane construction, using as examples 
only those machines which have been in a measure standardized. 
Glossary, diagrams and illustrations from photographs. 

Lit. Digest, 43:364; Nation, 93:295; N. Y. Times Rev. 16:335, 
May 28, '11. 

641. 1 Olsen, J. C. Pure foods. Ginn 80c 

11-22864 Textbook or popular reference work discussing the function, 
composition and cost of all varieties of food and giving simple 
tests for the detection of adulteration. Illustrated. 

11-23711 E. A. Locke's Food values (Appleton $1.25 n) prepared for 
students in the Harvard Medical School, consists chiefly of useful 
and accurate tables giving the comparative composition and nu- 
tritive value of common American foods, raw and cooked. 

12-5533 J- A. Murray's Economy of food (Appleton $1.50 n) is a more 

general work, first describing the nutrition required by the body, 
then taking up the comparative nutritive values of foods and diets. 
Terms and prices are English. 

Olsen, Cath. World, 94:253; Nation, 93:475. 

641.58 a Soyer, Nicolas. Soyer's paper-bag cookery. 

Sturgis 60c n 

11-19603 Describes author's new method of cooking by which, in many 
processes, ordinary cooking utensils are replaced by specially pre- 



i8 



NEW YORK STATE LIBRARY 



642.4 



I I -22391 



II-27471 



654.2 

11-500 

656 

11-29705 



658 

II-IO339 

II-14746 
I I -404 I 



II-II266 



11-1772 



pared paper bags. Contains sample receipts and a time table by 
which other receipts can be adapted to this use. 
Nation, 93^475; Outlook, 99:94- 



Burrell, C. B. "Caroline French Benton," pseud. 
Easy entertaining. Estes $1.50 

Suggestive menus for luncheon, breakfast, and dinner during 
the four seasons, and for such special occasions as picnics, Hal- 
lowe'en, Thanksgiving, Christmas etc., with numerous accompany- 
ing receipts, and ideas for table decoration. The demands are 
not extravagant, but the prices quoted seem optimistically low. 
First published in Harpe/s Basar. 

Frs J. M. Hill's Book of entrees (Little $1.50 n, (641.82) con- 
tains 800 receipts, simple and elaborate, (vegetables, meats, fruit 
etc.) with clear directions and often with illustrations from photo- 
graphs. Also about 75 menus and a chapter on casserole and 
planked dishes. Index. 

St John, T. M. Things a boy should know about wire- 
less. St John $1 

Explains clearly for amateurs the theory and practical opera- 
tions of wireless telegraphy, with 109 helpful illustrations. 

Hungerford, Edward. The modern railroad. 

McCIurg $1.75 n 

Interesting, detailed account, written for the general public, of 
the methods of modern American railroads and the duties of 
officials and employees. Enlivened by personal anecdotes. Well 
illustrated from photographs. Some chapters appeared in maga- 
zines. 

Jour, of Polit. Econ. 20:5.^9; Nation, 94:216; N. Y. Times Rev. 
17:99, Feb. 25, '12; Rev. of Rev. 45:508. 

c Taylor, F. W. The principles of scientific manage- 
ment. Harper $1.50 n 

Practical and persuasive exposition of the new management of 
business and other activities, which through science, harmony 
and cooperation, aims at " a maximum output and the develop- 
ment of each man to his greatest efficiency and prosperty." 

Author's Shop management 191 1 ed. (Harper $1.50 n) admir- 
ably complements, showing practical workings of principles. 

J. C. Duncan's The principles of industrial management (Apple- 
ton $2 n) deals with the scientific administration of a busmess 
plant, discussing environment, equipment, organization and manage- 
ment. Maps, plans, charts, sample cards, etc. Useful to manu- 
facturers and students of accountancy. 

A single phase of industrial management is treated in Cost- 
keeping for manufacturing plants by S. H. Bunnell (Appleton 
$3 n) which discusses installation, principles and proper use of 
cost system. 

F. B. Gilbreth in Motion study (Van Nostrand $2 n) explains 
how " scientific vs rule-of- thumb " methods applied by him to 
bricklaying resulted in an elimination of unnecessary motions, and 
in an increased output. Illustrated by diagrams and halftones. 
Reprinted from Industrial Engineering. 

Taylor, Principles, Engin. News, 65 : sup. p. 70, May 18, '11; 
Engin. Record, 64:174, Aug. 5, '11; N. Y. Times Rev. 16:412, 



BEST BCM3KS OF I9II I9 

June 25, *ii. Shop management. Annals of Amer. Acad. 38:645; 
N. Y. Times Rev. 16:410, June 25, '11. 

Duncan, Annals of Amer. Acad. 38:654; Engin. News, 65: sup. 
p. 55, Aug. 13, '11; Indus. Engin. 9:477- 

Bunnell, Engin. News, 66:sup. p. 9, Aug. 17, '11 ; Engin. Record, 
64:259; Indus. Engin. 10:36. 

694 c Wheeler, C. G. Shorter course in woodworking. 

Putnam $1.50 n 

11-12716 Practical manual, dealing clearly and concisely with common 
tools and their uses, and operations of progressive difficulty in 
shaping, fitting and finishing wood. Introduction to teachers and 
useful appendix of 74 pages on wood, elementary principles of 
construction, problems in drawing and laying out work, etc. 765 
clearly reproduced working drawings and halftones. 

ff 

PUBLIC AND PERSONAL HEALTH 

613 c Hutchinson^ Woods. Handbook of health. 

Houghton $1.25 n 

11-32411 Information, simply and admirably presented for the layman, 
about the mechanism, organs and functions of the body, the 
maintenance of health and efficiency, avoidance of infections, safe- 
guarding against accidents etc. 

11-28088 Author's Exercise and health (Outing handbooks, Outing 70c n, 
613.7) preaches in a breezy, interesting style the doctrine of open- 
air exercise as a daily habit. Pittsburgh 

Handbook of health, N. Y. Times Rev. 17:117, March 3, '12. 

613 c Ogden, H. N. Rural hygiene. (Rural sci. ser.) 

Macmillan $1.50 n 

11-1193 Clear, nontechnical and, in general, accurate treatment of the 

broad field of sanitation. Half deals with the location, construc- 
tion and ventilation of houses and barns, with water supply and 
sewage disposal for country houses and half with personal hygiene, 
emphasizing prevention and quarantine rather than causes and 
treatment. 

11-6972 Two volumes of the Young farme/s practical library (Sturgis 

75c n ea.) cover in more detail, parts of the same field. C. J. 
Lynde's Home waterworks; a manual of water supply in country 
homes, 628, takes up different methods of obtaining water for all 
purposes and, with less fulness, sewage disposal. H. F. Harris's 

11-20912 Health on the farm enlarges upon personal hygiene especially the 
hygiene of food (including approved receipts) with sections on 
the care of infants and sick, avoidable diseases and accidents. 

11-1295 A more general and scientific survey of the subject, including 

the problems of cities and states, is Mrs E. H. S. Richards's Con- 
servation by sanitation (Wiley $2.50, 6a8). It embodies the sub- 
stance of a college course for sanitary engineers and gives labora- 
tory exercises but is sufficiently untechnical for much wider use. 

Bibliography. 

Ogden, Engin. News, 65: sup. Apr. 13, '11, p. 52; Independent, 
7i:2Co; Survey, 26:627. 

Lynde, Engin. News, 66 :sup. Aug. 17, '11, p. 14; Engin. Record, 

63 :599. 

Harris, Enp:in. News, 67:507; Lit. Digest, 43:498. 
Richards, Engin. News, 65:sup. Apr. 13, '11, p. 51; Nation, 
't^_, 92:404; Science, n. s. 34:81. 



20 NEW YORK STATE LIBRARY 

614.4 ^ Howard, L. O. The house fly, disease carrier. 

Stokes $1.60 n 

11-12722 Important book stating in clear language the case against the 
house fly; gives its life history and habits, proof of its disease- 
carrying powers and preventive and exterminating measures. Il- 
lustrated. 

Dial, 51:19; Engin. News, 66:sup. Dec. 14, '11, p. 59; Nation, 
93 -425. 

614.44 Doty, A. H. Prevention of infectious diseases. 

Appleton $2.50 n 

ii""3974 Written by the former health officer of the port of New York. 

Primarily concerned with marine sanitation and quarantine, but the 
greater part is also of more general application. Discusses the 
means by which each of the more dangerous diseases is trans- 
mitted, the necessary preventive measures, disinfection and dis- 
infectants. 

Engin. News, 65:sup. Apr. 13, '11, p. 60. 

AGRICULTURE 

630.973 b Bailey, L. H. The country-life movement in the 

United States. (Rural outlook set) Macmillan $1.25 n 

11-7239 Broad and enlightening consideration of the rural problem 

with competent suggiestions for "making the country population 
most effective." Includes discussion of conservation, women on 
the farm, reform of county fairs etc. Author was a member of 

A11-1676 the Country Life Commission whose Report (Sturgis 75c n) has 
hitherto been printed only as a Senate document. It includes 
President Roosevelt's letter appointing the commission, describes 
its methods, summarizes the results of its investigations, and 
states its conclusions and recommendations. More general in ap- 
plication and scope and shorter than the former. 

11-25980 Of interest in this connection is H. R. Haggard's Rural Den- 
mark and its lessons (Longmans $2.25 n, 630.9489), which de- 
scribes the success of methods of agricultural education and co- 
operation among farmers in Denmark. Illustrations from photo- 
graphs. 

Bailey, Dial, 50:448; N. Y. Times Rev. 16:262, Apr. 30, '11; 
Rev. of Rev. 43:765. 

Country Life Com'n, Amer. Econ. Rev. 1:567; Lit. Digest, 
42:631; N. Y. Times Rev. 16:153, Mar. 19, '11. 

Haggard, Nature, 86:509; N. Y. Times Rev. 16:405, June 25, '11; 
Spec. 106:928, June 17, '11. 

636.1 c Pfungst, Oskar. Clever Hans (the horse of Mr von 

Osten) : a contribution to experimental animal and 

human psychology. Holt $1.50 n 

11-10970 Careful and exhaustive account of the feats of a trained horse 
which answered difficult questions in arithmetic and other sub- 
jects, and of the scientific investigation by which it was proved 
that he acted upon signals unconsciously given by the questioner. 
Dial, 51:20; Jour, of Philos. 8:663; N. Y. Times Rev. 16:456, 
July 23, 'II. 

637 Rose, Laura. Farm dairying. McClurg$i.25 n 

II-IO079 Practical, popular treatment, including choice and care of 
cattle, composition, treatment and marketing of milk, butter and 
by-products, water supply, construction of stables etc. Illustrated, 
Lit. Pjgest, 43:324; Rev. of Rev. 43:765- 



BEST BOOKS OF I9II 21 



FINE ARTS 

707 Lecoq de Boisbaudran, Horace. The training of the 

memory in art and the education of the artist ; tr. from 
the French by L. D. Luard. Macmillan $2 n 

12-846 Three papers, first published in collected form, in French, in 

1879, but still up to date and suggestive. They embody the theories 
of a famous and original French art teacher, emphasizing the im- 
portance of training the artist's memory, and providing a series 
of lessons. Illustrated. 

Acad. 81 '.442; Internat. Studio, 45 185, Nov. '11. 

708 . 1 Henderson, H. W. The Pennsylvania Academy of the 

Fine Arts and other collections of Philadelphia. (Art 

galleries of America) Page $3 

11-30788 Gives brief histories of the collections and their most valuable 
works. Confined mainly to painting, but includes also sculpture 
and ceramics. Chiefly valuable for its outline of colonial art and 
detailed description of historical portraits. 64 halftone reproduc- 
tions of paintings and other works of art. 
Nation, 93:613. 

708.3 Preyer, D. C. The art of the Vienna galleries. 

Page $2 n 

11-13353 A well-planned book for travelers or home study, giving short 
histories of the chief collections, public and private, with critical 
descriptions of their most important paintings. Half the book is 
devoted to the great Imperial Museum. Plans of galleries are 
given and 48 reproductions of paintings. 
Nation, 93:562. 

723.52 West, G. H. Gothic architecture in England and 

France. Macmillan $2.25 n 

ii~35754 Compact, well-illustrated handbook dealing primarily with 
English Gothic, but with parallel treatment of the French. In- 
tended to show the underlying principles of medieval art. 
Ath. 1911, 2:107; Internat. Studio, 45:169; Outlook, 98:553. 

728.6 Saylor, H. H. Bungalows; their design, construction 

and furnishing; with suggestions also for camps, 

summer homes and cottages of similar character. 

McBride $1.50 n 

ii~i3352 The most practical and architecturally sound book on bunga- 
lows yet published. It discusses the advantages and the limitations 
of the bungalow type of house, its design, construction and fur- 
nishing, and gives excellent advice on lighting, water supply, 
sewage disposal and garden planting. The 78 illustrations show 
plans, exteriors and interiors. A. L. A. Booklist 
N. Y. Times Rev. 16:455, July 23, '11. 

745 Lewis, G. G. Practical book of oriental rugs. 

Lippincott $4.50 n 

11-29718 Part I gives clear and sensible advice on the selection, purchase 
and care of rugs and a chapter on desifa:n. Part 2 contains a sys- 
tematic description, for purposes of identification, of each variety 
of rug from each of the oriental countries. Gives usual price per 
square foot. Useful to buyer and dealer. Many illustrations, some 



22 NEW YORK STATE LIBRARY 

in color. Glossary and bibliography. Mumford's Oriental rugs 
(A. L. A, Catalog) remains the authority from historical and 
artistic standpoints. 

Dial. 51:533; Nation, 93:613. 

759.4 c Caifin, C. H. The story of French painting. 

Century $1.20 n 

11-28327 A popular survey from 15 15 to the present time treating of 
representative artists in chronoloipcal order and attempting to 
correlate the growth of painting with the changes in national life. 
Most space is given to the 19th century. Illustrated. 

11-23293 Louis Hourticq's Art in France (Ars una, species mille, Scrib- 
ner $1.50 n, 70944) is the third in an excellent series of compact 
and authoritative reference books, for description of which see 
Best Books 1909, p. 19, under Armstrong. This work covers the 
development of architecture, painting, sculpture and other arts in 
France. 

Caffin, Dial, 51 :534. 

Hourticq, Dial 51 .-480; Nation, 93:404; Sat. Rev. 112: sup. Oct. 

769 Dtirer, Albrecht. Albrecht Diirer; his engravings and 

wood-cuts. (Great engravers; ed. by A. M. Hind) 

Stokes 80c n 

W12-1 Consists of 65 excellent halftone reproductions and an intro- 

duction (5 p.) describing Diirer's characteristics as an engraver 
and the technic of his processes. Short bibliography and com- 
plete lists of his engravings and woodcuts. 

Other volumes in this series also published in 191 it treat simi- 
larly the engravings of Goya, Mantegna, J. R. Smith, VanDyck 
and Watteau, sometimes including others of their schools. 

Diirer, N. Y. Times Rev. 17:55, Feb. 4, '12. 

Goya & Van Dyck, Sat. Rev. 113:280. 

Smith & Watteau, Spec. 1(^:130, Jan. 27, '12. 

GARDENS AND GARDENING; CITY PLANNING. 
710 Robinson, C. M. The width and arrangement of 

streets ; a study in town planning. McGraw-Hill $2 

11-27317 Considers the problem of streets the most important feature of 
city planning, and urges their adaptation in width and character 
to location and use. Gives good and bad examples in photographs 
and plans of real conditions in this country and abroad. 

11-2986 William Solotaroff^s Shade-trees in towns and cities (Wiley 

$3 n, 715) treats of the choice, planting and care of shade trees 
for roads, parks and private grounds with specizd attention to 
combatting diseases and pests and advice as to legislation and the 
establishment of departments of municipal arboriculture. Well 
illustrated and practical. Supplements Fernow's Care of trees in 
Best Books 1910. 

A11-1659 A. D. Webster's Town planting (Button $1.75 n, 715), written 
especially for English conditions, deals with varieties of trees, 
shrubs and plants best adapted to resist the smoke of cities, and 
with methods of caring for them. 

Robinson, Engin. News, 66: sup. Dec. 14, '11, p. 56; Survey, 
27:1344. 

Solotaroflf, Engin. News, 65: sup. Mar. 16, '11, p. 36; Survey, 
26 :588. 



BEST BOOKS OF I9II 23 

716 b Ely, Mrs H. R. The practical flower garden. 

Macmillan $2 n 

11-7395 Results of author's experience in caring for grass and ever- 

greens, arranging flowers to secure successive eifects, raising 
plants and trees from seed, and use of fertilizers. Chapters on 
terraces and the wild garden. Lists of plants and many illustra- 
tions, including eight colored plates. 

Dial, 50:446; Nation, 92:429; N. Y. Times Rev. 16:343, June 

4, 'II. 
716. 1 McCoUom, W. C. Vines and how to grow them. 

(Garden lib.) Doubleday $1.10 n 

11-18258 A practical book on the choice and care of vines, mainly for 
ornamental purposes. Especially valuable for descriptive lists of 
different varieties, classified by season of blooming, color of flower, 
hardiness etc. Illustrations from photographs. 

Lit. Digest, 43:501; Nation, 93:84; N. Y. Times Rev. 16:459, 
July 23, 'II. 

MUSIC 

See also Children's books, p. 49 
780 b Schauffler, R. H. The musical amateur; a book on 

the human side, of music. Houghton $1.25 n 

11-273312 Of highly readable and stimulating quality, are these papers on 
The creative listener. What the amateur escapes. Musical indiges- 
tion. The musician's parasite, etc., which combine entertaining per- 
sonal anecdote and confession with serious reflection. 

Edward Dickinson's The education of a music lover (Scribner 
$1.50 n, 780.7) is more ambitious, pointing out through illuminating 
discussions of form, melody, harmony, art of the pianist, art of 
11-6477 song, etc., how an amateur music lover may become a critically 
appreciative listener and how musical education adds to both '' the 
gladness of life and to inward culture." Supplements but does 
not supplant Krehbiel's How to listen to music (1896) andKobbe's 
How to appreciate music (1906). 

Schauffler, Bookman, 34:625; Nation, 93:452. 

Dickinson, Chic. Post, Nov. 24, '11: 5; Nation, 92:406. 

780.92 Hcrvey, Arthur. Franz Liszt and his music. 

Lane $1.50 n 

11-19600 An enthusiastic short study which opens with a brief biography 

and closes with a bibliography of Liszt's chief, compositions and of 
books about him. Mainly given to analysis of his work as a com- 
poser: his pianoforte music, symphonic works and sacred works 
and songs,- with musical illustrations and portrait. 

Ath. 191 1, 1:698; Dial, 51:394; Nation, 93:172; N. Y. Times 
Rev. 16: 484, Aug. 6, '11. 

786.3 c Browcr, Harriettc. The art of the pianist. 

C. Fischer $1.25 n 

11-7309 Clear, detailed and sensible advice for pupils as well as teachers, 

explaining the principles of technic with directions how to train 
the hand and how to express feeling. 

H. E. Krehbiel's Pianoforte and its music (Music lovers' lib. 
11-1634 Scribner $1.25 n, 786) traces the evolution of the instrument, the 
music composed for it and the players who have interpreted it. 

Krehbiel, Dial, 50:356; Nation, 92:123; N. Y. Times Rev. 16:73, 
Feb. 12, *ii. 



24 NEW YORK STATE LIBRARY 

788 Clapp6, A. A. The wind-band and its instruments. 

Holt $1.50 n 

11-27896 First adequate treatment of history, construction, acoustics, 
techttic and combination of wind instruments. Valuable to or- 
chestras and bands and of interest to the general reader. Illus- 
trations, musical notations and charts. 
Nation, 93:529. 

AMUSEMENTS AND SPORTS 

See also Children's books, p. 49 

792 b Herts, A. M. The Children's Educational Theatre. 

Harper $1.25 n 

11-28104 Extremely interesting account by its former manager, of the 
work of this theater in the New York East Side, and its good 
effect upon actors and audience, with plea for its reestablishment 
and favorable comment by well-known educators. 

Nation, 94:67; N. Y. Times Rev. 16:821, Dec. 10, 'il. 

792 c Montague, C. E. Dramatic values. 

Macmillan $1.25 n 

11-19359 Short essays in dramatic criticism, reprinted from English 
periodicals, treating such subjects as the plays of Synge, Shaw, 
Ibsen and others, good and bad subjects for plays, the wholesome 
play, good acting, etc. 

11-24567 Channing Pollock's Footlights fore and aft (Badger $1.50 n) 
consists of light, gossipy, amusing papers on the plays, actors, 
advertising and routine of the American stage by a dramatic critic 
and playwright. The 50 crude caricatures repel many readers who 
would enjoy the text. 

Montague, Ath. 1911, i :487;' Nation, 92:453. 
Pollock, Independent, 71:1409; N. Y. Times Rev. 16:797, Dec. 
3, 'II. 

793 Haddon, Kathleen. Cat's cradles from many lands. 

Longmans 90c 

A11-1623 More than 50 string games and tricks from all over the world 
with diagrams and clear directions. 
Ath. 1911, 1:275; Nature, 86:108. 

796 Clark, E. H. Reminiscences of an athlete. 

Houghton $1.25 n 

11-11674 Record, full of interesting anecdotes, of 20 years* experiences 
(1889-1910) in amateur track and field athletics, including Har- 
vard training, success in Olympic games (1896), and all-round 
championship of New England and America. Modest, genial and 
high in ethical tone. 16 halftones, chiefly portraits. 
Lit. Digest, 43:25, July i, *ii. 

797 c Davis, P. H. Football, the American intercollegiate 

game. Scribner $2.50 n 

11-24990 Describes origin and history of the game in the United States 
to 1910 and gives technical accounts of intercollegiate games of 
the last 20 years. Appendix contains proceedings of conventions 
and sessions of rules committees. 



BEST BOOKS OF I9II 



25 



11-26925 Walter Camp's Football for the spectator (Badger 75c n) gives 
a brief and simple but sufficiently comprehensive explanation of 
the general plan of play, penalties, and duties of referee, umpire, 
field judge and linesman. 

Davis, Bookman, 34:300. 

Camp, N. Y. Times Rev. 16:729, Nov. 19, '11. 



ESSAYS ETC. 

426 Matthews, J. V. A study of versification. 

Houghton $1.25 

11-14523 A Qoll^e textbook which gives clearly, attractively and with 
pertinent examples, an analysis of the mechanism of verse, with 
the aim of inspiring in the student or general reader appreciation 
of the methods of poets. 

Bookman; 34:90; Nation, 93:334; N. Y. Times Rev. 16:401, 
June 25, *ii. 

814.49 Flandrau, C. M. Prejudices. Appleton $1.25 n 

11-12048 Fourteen piquant essays and sketches, at times engagingly in- 
timate, on dogs, wanderlust, parents and children, fellow passen- 
gers, Ann Veronica, holidays, servants etc. 

Bookman, 33:461; Dial, 50:477; Nation, 93:62. 

814.49 Lane, Mrs John. Talk of the town. Lane $1.25 n 

11-25100 Short, amusing and kindly satirical essays chiefly on life in 
London and the fancies inspired thereby in an American woman. 
Ath. 191 1, 2:267; Dial, 51:343; Nation, 93:344; N. Y. Times 
Rev. 16:650, Oct. 22, '11. 

814.49 Strunsky, Simeon. The patient observer and his 

friends. Dodd $1.20 n 

11-5538 Thirty-four amusing^ original papers on types of people, fa- 

miliar experiences, traits and tendencies as they appear to the 
observant, quietly satirical eye of a New York newspaper man. 

H-2712 Epigrammatic and paradoxical, serious and frivolous, is G. K. 

Chesterton's Alarms and discursions (Dodd $1.50 n, 834.89) con- 
sisting of 40 short essays on such a variety of subjects as dukes, 
cheese, the sentimentalist, anarchist, country life, painting the town 
red, etc. 

Strunsky, Dial, 50:311; Nation, 92:449; N. Y. Times Rev. 
16:386, June 18, '11. 

Chesterton, Dial, 50:352; Nation, 92:480; N. Y. Times Rev. 
16:136, Mar. 12, '11. 

821.83 Lounsbury, T. R. The early literary career of Robert 

Browning; four lectures. (Univ. of Virginia, Bar- 
bour-Page foundation) Scribner $1.20 n 

11-28317 Criticism and analysis of Browning's early poems, 1833 to 1846, 
with account of their reception by the public. Clear, sensible, not 
overlaudatory. 

Dial, 52:91; Nation, 93:494; North Amer. Rev. 194:929; Out- 
look, 99:781. 

824.89 Lucas, E. V. Old lamps for new. Macmillan $1.25 n 

11-243912 Essays and sketches, wise and witty, discussing topics of litera- 
ture and art, or dealing reflectively and whimsically with real or 
imagined experiences. 

Dial, 51:257; N. Y. Times Rev. 16:732, Nov. 25, '11. 



26 NEW YORK STATE LIBRARY 

891.73 b Phelps, W. L. Essays on Russian novelists. 

Macmillan $1.25 n 

11-1349 Contents: Russian national character, Gogol, Turgeney, Do- 

stoevski, Tolstoi, Gorki, Chekhov, Artsybashev, Andreev, Kuprin's 
picture of garrison life. 

Full of positive opinions and enthusiastic appreciations and 
likely to serve author's avowed purpose of attracting novel readers 
into this profitable field. 

Ath. 191 1, 1:382; Nation, 92:346; N. Y. Times Rev. 16:76, Feb. 
12, '11; Outlook, 98:13. 

■ 

ANTHOLOGIES AND POETRY 

811 .49 Bates, K. L. America the beautiful and other poems. 

Crowell $1.25 n 

11-26756 Short poems of a high average in quality and unusual variety 
in subject and meter, including verses on American history, im- 
pressions of foreign travel, memorial poems and translations of 
Spanish folk songs. 

Dial, 52:52; Independent, 71:1087. 

811 .49 Cawcin, M. J. Poems. Macmillan $1.35 n 

11-23287 135 poems representative of the author's work, selected by him. 
chiefly from his Collected poems (5 v. 1907), with 15 poems 
from later volumes and two now first published. The introductory 
appreciation by Ho wells is reprinted from the North American 
Review, 1908. 
Nation, 93:394- 

811.49 Peabody, J. P. (Mrs L. S. Marks). The singing man; 

a book of songs and shadows. Houghton $1.10 

11-29670 Short poems of a high imaginative quality, some of which have 
appeared in magazines. Most of them voice an earnest protest 
against existing social conditions. 

Bellman, 12:82; Dial, 52:53; N. Y. Times Rev. 17:70, Feb. 
II, '12; Rev. of Rev. 45:116. 

811.49 ^ Van Dyke, H. J. Poems. Scribner $2 n 

11-25704 First complete collection, containing many hitherto unpublished 
poems. Grouped by subject and form rather than by date. In- 
cludes the drama The House of Rimmon. Portrait and index of 
first lines. 

Nation, 93 •'394; N. Y. Times Rev. 16:791, Dec. 3, 'n; Outlook, 
99:704. 

821.08 c Porter, D. R. cbmp. Poems of action. Ass'n Press 7Sc 

12-65 Designed especially for older boys. An excellent, short anthology 

of stirring songs — poems of patriotism and outdoors preponderat- 
ing. An unusual proportion by modern American authors. 

821.08 c Porter, D. C. comp. Poems of action. Ass'n Press 75c 

poets. 2d ser. McClurg $1.50 n 

11-4959 Anthology of newspaper and periodical verse, 1885 to 1910, with 

selections from the collected works of minor poets. Includes 
writers in the United States, Great Britain and colonies. Index of 
first lines only. 

Bellman, 11:83; Independent, 71:1209; N. Y. Times Rev. 16:592, 
Oct. I, '11. 



BEST BOOKS OF I9II 27 

821.08 Withers, Percy, comp. The garland of childhood; a 

little book for all lovers of children. Holt $1.50 n 

11-11438 Pleasant little anthology of poems, with a few prose selections, 
about children. Familiar and little-known authors are included. 
In arrangement and appearance similar to Lucas's The open road, 

DRAMA 

See also Children's books, p. 49 

823.83 Dickens, Charles. Scenes from Dickens for drawing- 
room and platform acting; adapted and ed. by Guy & 
Ernest Pertwee. Dutton $1.25 n 

Fifteen short dramatized scenes from David Copper field, Pick* 
12-37636 wick papers, Nicholas Nickleby, Martin Chuszlewit, Old Curiosity 
shop, Oliver Twist, Christmas carol. Our mutual friend, Boots at 
the Holly-tree Inn. Suitable for amateur acting. Costume illustra- 
tions. 

DESCRIPTION AND TRAVEL 

See also Children's books, p. 49-50 
913.32 Maspero, Sir G. C. C. Egypt: ancient sites and modern 

scenes ; tr. by Elizabeth Lee. Appleton $4 n 

Ai 1-782 Fascinatingly vivid and interesting papers, recording the im- 
pressions and experiences of the director of the Service of An- 
tiquities in Egypt during his annual inspection of the monuments. 
Illustrations from photographs. 

11-13132 Alexandre Moret's In the time of the Pharaohs (Putnam $2 n) 
consists of interesting popular papers by an Egyptologist, on the 
" Book of the dead," belief in magic and other phases of life in 
ancient Egypt and on the modern restoration of the temples. 
Maps and illustrations from photographs. 

Maspero, Ath. 1911, 1:167; Nation, 92:602; N. Y. Times Rev. 
16:193, Apr. 2, '11; Sat. R. 111:652. 

Moret, Lit. Digest, 43:216; Nation, 93:524; Sat. R. 112:211. 

914 Bates, E. S. Touring in 1600; a study in the develop- 

ment of travel as a means of education. 

Houghton $3 n 

11-35803 Spirited and valuable reconstruction of the conditions and dif- 
ficulties of early seventeenth century travel in Europe and the 
East, describing, from 230 contemporary sources, Inns, guidebooks, 
cost, routes etc. Highly readable and based on indefatigable re- 
search. Illustrated from contemporary prints. 

Bookman, 34:298; Dial, 51:344; Lit. Digest, 43:1050; Nation, 
93 '632. 

914.15 Syngc, J. M. The Aran Islands. Luce $1.25 n 

11-11681 Strikingly faithful and sympathetic records of the people of 
these islands off the west coast of Ireland — their primitive life, 
customs, superstitions — with translations of Irish folk tales and 
poems recited there. Map and illustrations by J. B. Yeats, which 
with a few rapid lines convey the spirit most effectively. 
Ath. 19TT, 1:182; Independent, 71:44; Nation, 93:346. 



28 NEW YORK STATE LIBRARY 

914.2 b Coulevain, Pierre de, pseud, (Mile Favre de Coule- 

vain). The unknown isle; tr. fr. the French by Alys 
Hallard. Cassell $1.35 n 

H-12506 A French novelist's candid but sympathetic criticisms and 
analyses of English life and character, connected by a slight 
thread of story. 

Bookman, 34:81; Dial, 51:80; N. Y. Times Rev. 16:370, June 
II, '11. 

914.42 Farley, Mrs Agnes, "Vados," pseud. The Belmont 

book. Button $1.25 n 

Ai 1-2674 Intimate, sympathetic sketches and stories of the peasants and 
country life of a little village of South Normandy where the 
author spends her summers. Full of humor, romance and human 
interest. 

Ath. ipii, 1:507; Dial, 5i:345; Nation, 94:190; Spec. 106:656, 
Apr. 29, 'ii. 

914.5 Forman, H. J. The ideal Italian tour. 

Houghton $1.50 n 

11-^37 Compactly but attractively printed handbook of pocket size de- 

scribing the chief sights of the Italian tour ordinarily taken by 
travelers, with more detail and appreciation than the guidebook 
it is intended to supplement. Also readable for home consulta- 
tion. Index and short bibliography. Illustrations from photo- 
graphs. 

Bellman, 10:626; Dial, 50:448; Nation, 92:451; N. Y. Times 
Rev. 16:390, June 18, '11. 

914.53 Hutton, Edward. Venice and Venetia. 

Macmillan $2 n 

A kind of glorified guidebook. Fourteen chapters are devoted 
12-35175 to Venice and her islands, six to Treviso, Padua, Vicenza, Verona 
etc. With all its charm of style and brilliant impressionism, this 
is perhaps the most complete guide to Venice ever published. 
Nation, 93:578. 14 colored plates by Maxwell Armfield and 12 
halftone reproductions of paintings. 
11-28371 E. R. Williams, jr's, Plain-towns of Italy (Houghton $4 n), 
a companion volume to his Hill-towns of Italy, omits Venice and 
her islands, but devotes attention chiefly to Venetia, including 
some smaller towns not covered by Hutton's Venice and Venetia. 
Representing three years of travel and study, it offers, in an en- 
thusiastic, agreeable style, information on history, art, legends 
etc. and some personal experiences. Map and 48 excellent half- 
tones, of which six are double-paged. 

Things seen in Venice (Dutton 75c n) by L. and L. M. Ragg 

is an interesting little introductory volume providing pleasant 

reading for the stay-at-home and some suggestions for the sight- 

W12-78 seer. Describes principally canals, prominent buildings, fasts and 

festivals, with a chapter on seeing Venice on foot 48 halftones. 

Hutton, Ath. 1912, 1:10; Dial, 51:532, 

Williams, Dial, 51^475; Nation, 94-215; Outlook, 100:50 

914.6 Franck, H. A. Four months afoot in Spain. 

Century $2 n 

11-27793 Vivid, picturesque record of a zigzag journey from Gibraltar 
to Bordeaux made chiefly on foot and at the cost of $172 from 
New York. Life author's Vagabond journey around the world. 



BEST BOOKS OF I9II 29 

full of humor, romance and color, wanderlust, and affection for 
the masses. 

Acad. 81:664; Bookman, 34:549; Dial, 52:26; Nation, 93:581; 
N. Y. Times Rev. 16:764, Dec 3, '11. 

914.69 c Sale, Mark, pseud. A paradise in Portugal. 

Doubleday $i n 

11-11243 Pleasant, rambliiig essays describing the surroundings, house- 
keeping and meditations of an Englishwoman, wife of an artist, 
who lives for the sake of health and economy in a little Portu- 
guese village. English title A shadowed paradise. 

Dial, 50:441; Nation, 93:59; N. Y. Times Rev. 16:388, June 
18, 'II. 

914.81 c Daniels, H. K. Home life in Norway. (Home life 

in many lands) Macmillan $1.75 n 

12-350Q6 Informal, popular account of everyday life in town and country 
as seen by an Englishman during 20 years' residence. Accurate 
in all essentials and reproducing much of the genuine atmosphere. 
Illustrations from photographs. 

Nation, 94:190; N. Y. Times Rev. 16:764, Dec. 3, '11; Spec. 
107:906, Nov. 25, '11. 

914.92 b Meldrum, D. S. Home life in Holland. (Home life 

in many lands) Macmillan $1.75 n 

ii~35753 Treats in much more detail of household life than the author's 
excellent Holland and the Hollanders. It seldom repeats and 
where it covers the same ground does so more fully and shows 
throughout increased knowledge and appreciation. Omits much 
of the general description and histony covered in the earlier book 
and is more amusing and informal in style. New illustrations. 

Acad. 81:632; Ath. 1911, 2:420; N. Y. Times Rev. 16:468, July 
30, 'II. 

915 Abraham, J. J. The surgeon's log ; being impressions of 

the Far East. Button $2.50 n 

12-35187 A London physician in pursuit of health, sails as ship's doctor 
on a freight steamer's many months' voyage. His entertaining, 
very personal record shows the simplicity, fellowship and humor 
of sea relations, and gives interesting impressions of Japanese and 
Dutch East Indian ports. 44 halftone photographs. 

Acad. 81:600; Ath. 1911, 2:420; Outlook, (Eng.) 28:672; Spec. 
107:1021, Dec. 9, '11. 

915 c Collier, Price. The West in the East from an Ameri- 

can point of view. Scribner $1.50 n 

11-11073 Vivid impressions of civilization and government in India, 
China and Japan, colored by an alert, stimulating and often preju- 
diced personality. 

The most readable and the best worth reading of books on the 
Asia of to-day. Nation, 93:100. 

A11-1072 Valentine Chirol's Indian unrest (Macmillan $2 n, 91.S.4). less 
entertaining, is, however, highly valuable for its analysis of the 
causes of Indian disaffection, the effect of western civilization on 
eastern, and for its temperate and constructive discussion of prob- 
lems which confront British government. Reprinted in revised 
and enlarged form from The Times. 

A12-219 The little volume. Things seen in northern India (Dutton 75c n, 
915.4) by T. L. Pennell, presents readably a considerable variety 



30 NEW YORK STATE LIBRARY 

of information on rural and urban life, religions, people, modes 
of travel etc. 50 excellent halftone photographs. 

Collier, Dial, 51:294; Nation, 93:100; N. Y. Times Rev. 16:342, 
June 4, '11. 

Chirol, Acad. 80:12; Annals of Amer. Acad. 38:650; Sat. R. 
111:212; Spec. 105:1082, Dec. 17, '10. 

Pennell, Acad. 82:236. 

915 Hart, A. B. The obvious Orient. Appleton $1.50 n 

1 1-7266 Illuminating, readable comments on life and conditions (1908^-9) 

in Japan, China, the Philippines and several British colonies, pre- 
ceded by chapters on the Northwest of Canada and the Umted 
States. Author, an eminent student of history and politics, with 
unusual opportunities for observation, has penetrated beneath sur- 
face impressions. 

11-29698 P. S. Reinsch's Intellectual and political currents in the Far 
East^ (Houghton $2 n) is a brilliant study of oriental thought and 
politics under western influences, contributing notably to a sym- 
pathetic understanding of present movements (1911) in India, 
China and Japan. Based on contemporary sources, and corre- 
spondence with friends in the East. 

Hart, Dial, 50:597; Nation, 93:192; N. Y. Times Rev. 16:362, 
June II, '11. 

Reinsch, Atlantic, 109:383; Dial, 52:87; N. Y. Times Rev. 
17:66, Feb. II. '12; Outlook, 100:557. 

915. 1 b Ross, E. A. The changing Chinese; the conflict of 

oriental and western cultures in China. 

Century $2.40 n 

11-28372 Vivid, discerning interpretations of life and characteristics from 
the standpoint of a sociological expert. Contains informing, read- 
able chapters on The race mind of the Chinese, The opium evil. 
Women, Christianity, The new education, etc., based on first-hand 
observation. 88 halftones. 

11-29045 Many of the same subjects are dealt with in J. K. Goodrich's 
The coming China (McClurg $1.50 n), a study of China's rela- 
tions with the powers prior to the rebellion (1911). Author has 
been for many years a resident of the East. 49 illustrations from 
photographs. 

11-7880 Dr W. E. Griffis's China's story in myth, legend, art and an- 

nals (Houghton $1.25 n, 951) is a simple, readable outline of his- 
tory, interpreting sympathetically Chinese human nature and 
civilization. The result of four years* residence, a life long in- 
terest, and acquaintance with Chinese scholars and literature. 16 
halftones. 

TI-2974T An informal account of personal experiences as lady-in-waiting 
to the Empress Dowager (1903-5) is found in Two years in the 
Forbidden City (Moffat $2 n, 915.11) by Princess Der Ling (now 
Mrs T. C. White) the daughter of a progressive Chinese official. 
Throws interesting light on the characters of Empress and Em- 
peror and gives an intimate picture of court life. 22 illustrations. 
Ross, Dial, 51:388; Nation, 93:574; N. Y. Times Rev. 16:730, 
Nov. 10, '11. 

Goodrich, Dial. 52:87; Nation, 93:575; N. Y. Times Rev. 
16:709, Nov. 12, '11. 

Griffis, Dial, 50 :48i ; Nation, 93 :575 ; N. Y. Times Rev. 16 :362, 
June II. '11. 

Der Ling, Dial, 52:87; Sat. R. 113:464; Spec. 108:553, Apr. 
6, '12. 



BEST BOOKS OF IpII 3I 

915.3 Bury, G. W. "Abdullah Mansur," /^j^wd. The land of 

Uz. Macmillan $2.75 n 

A12-698 Informing and extremely spirited account of author's adven- 
tures in Southern Arabia while making explorations in the interests 
of the British protectorate of Aden, (especially in the remoter 
regions, hardly known to any other European), which he visited in 
the disguise of a down-country chief. Folding map and 37 half- 
tones from author's photographs. 

11-35873 The northern Arabian desert is described in M. J. Kendall's 
Sinai in spring (Dutton $1.50 n, 915.31), a pleasant little chronicle 
of an Englishman's camel journal along the old "pilgrim's way," 
to Mt Sinai and the convent of St Katharine. Map and 47 half- 
tones. 

A11-1677 G. L. Bell's Amurath to Amurath (Dutton $5 n, 915.6) de- 
scribes a five months' journey through Asiatic Turkey taken by an 
Englishwoman in 1909, from Aleppo down the Euphrates to Bag- 
dad and back to Konia. Valuable for her explorations of the 
little-known medieval antiquities of Mesopotamia and fascinating 
for her first-hand account of Arab life and her own experiences. 
200 illustrations from author's photographs, many plans and fold- 
ing map. 

Bury, N. Y. Times Rev. 17:98, Feb. 25, '12; Sat. R. 113:341; 
Spec. 108:274 Feb. 17, '12. 

Rendall, Ath. 191 1, 1:506; Sat. R. 112:85; Spec. 106:657, 
Apr. 29, '11. 

Bell, Ath. 191 1, 1:151; Dial, 50:440; Nation, 93:32; Spec 
106:483, Apr. I, '11. 

915.69 b Huntington, Ellsworth. Palestine and its transfor- 
mation. Houghton $2 n 

11-9236 Interesting, original study, tracing effect of the geologic struc- 

ture, topography and climate of Palestine upon Hebrew char- 
acter, thought and history. Author, assistant professor of geog- 
raphy at Yale, includes illustrative personal experiences of his 
explorations. Maps, charts and numerous halftones. 

11-9238 C. F. Kent's Biblical geography and history (Scribner $1.50 n, 

aaa9i) also emphasizes throughout the relation between geo- 
graphical and physical features and history in Bible lands, 
especially Palestine. Part i (84 p.) gives a clear, vivid picture of 
physical characteristics; part 2 (p. 87-278) outlines history. 16 
maps, bibliography and list of stereographs and stereopticon slides. 
Huntington, Amer. Hist. Rev. 17:112; Ath. 191 1, 2:161; Nation, 
93:627; Nature, 87:544; Outlook, 98:266; Spec. 107:281, Aug. 

19, 'II. 

Kent, Biblical World, n. s. 38:208; Nation, 93:63; Outlook, 
98 1266. 

917. II Talbot, F. A. The new garden of Canada. 

Cassell $2.50 n 

11-25734 Graphic account of a singularly interesting journey by pack- 
horse and canoe across undeveloped New British Columbia from 
Wolf's Creek in Alberta to Prince Rupert, along the proposed line 
of the new Grand Trunk Pacific, noting especially resources and 
scenery. Map and 48 excellent halftones. 

ii"'35870 The making of a great Canadian railway, by the same author 
(Lippincott .$3-50 n, 635.1), containing some of the same material 
as the previous book, relates the story of the planning and con- 
struction of this second Canadian transcontinental railroad, em- 



32 NEW YORK STATE LIBRARY 

phasizing the picturesque and romantic features of the work. 
Map and 41 halftones. 
11-22410 W. L. Griffith's The Dominion of Canada (All red ser. Little 
$3 n, 917.1) is a comprehensive, trustworthy work on history, re- 
sources, people, social conditions, government, products etc., espe- 
cially worth while for treatment of questions of immediate (1911) 
interest. 

New garden of Canada, Ath. 1911, 1:625; Sat. R. 111:754; 
Spec. 106:817, May 27, '11. 

Making of a great Canadian railway, Ath. 191 1, 2:488; Spec. 
i07:5S3f Oct. 7, '11 ; Outlook (Eng.) 28:512. 

Griffith, Ath. 191 1, 2:11; Dial, 51:130; Nation, 93:147; Spec 
107:284, Aug. 19, '11. 

917 '47 Jenkins, Stephen. The greatest street in the world. 

Putnam $3.50 n 

ii-r26982 History and description of Broadway from the discovery- of 
the Hudson to the present day, recounting events and describing 
buildings not only from Bowling Green to Spuyten Duyvil, but 
following its continuation in the old post road to Albany. In spite 
of inaccuracies, of much interest and value. Fully illustrated 
from photographs, old prints and maps. Index and bibliography. 
11-27481 J. B. Kerfoot's Broadway (Houghton $2 n, 917.471) charming 
in luxurious type and 43 plates from drawings by Lester F. 
Hornby, is a pleasant, impressionistic essay on the atmosphere and 
associations of the street within city limits. 

Both, Dial, 51^474; N. Y. Times Rev. 16:795, Dec. 3, '11. 
Jenkins, Nation, 93:605; N. Y. Times Rev. 16:766, Dec. 3, '11. 
Kerfoot, Bookman, 34^547; Nation, 93:546. 

917.7 Mathews, J. L. The log of the Easy Way. 

Small $1.50 n 

11-25967 Enjoyable record of an unconventional honeymoon trip in a 
small houseboat from Chicago to New Orleans, by way of the 
Drainage canal and the Illinois and Mississippi rivers. Describes 
picturesquely unusual experiences, out of the way people and the 
lure of the great river. 

Cath. World, 94^397; Dial, 51 :345. 

917.8 Mills, E. A. The spell of the Rockies. 

Houghton $1.75 n 

11-29625 A mountaineer's graphically related adventures with avalanches 
and storms, studies of mountain-top weather, beavers, coyotes and 
other animals of the Rocky mountains. 24 halftones of author's 
photographs. 

Dial, 51:527; Nation, 93:526. 

917.94 a Muir, John. My first summer in the Sierra. 

Houghton $2.50 n 

11-14183 Diary of a trip pin 1869 to the headwaters of the Merced and 
Tuolumne rivers and the Yosemite region. Author accompanied a 
flock of 2000 sheep, but accounts of camp life are secondary to the 
enthusiastic and poetic descriptions of nature and of sometimes 
thrilling experiences. Beautifully illustrated from photographs 
with some sketches made on the trip. 

ii~5255 J. S. Chase's Yosemite trails (Houghton $2 n) is hardly less 

charming in its way, describing with spirit and detail, partly with 
a view to guidebook use, the Yosemite valley and the high Sierra 
as seen on three expeditions especially to the less frequented parts. 
This also gives much attention to flora and fauna. Illustrations 
from photographs and map. 



BEST BOOKS OF I9II 33 

Muir, Dial, 51:251; Nation, 92:651; N. Y. Times Rev. 16:480, 
Aug. 6, '11. 

Chase, Dial, 50:445; Lit. Digest, 42:1013; Nation, 92:504; N. Y. 
Times Rev. 10:209, Apr. 9, '11. 

917.94 c White, S. E. The cabin. Doubleday $1.50 n 

11-9923 A delightfully fresh and entertaining description of outdoor 

life in the Californian Sierra and of characters encpuntered in 
vacation sojourns of the author and his wife. 

Bookman, 33^433; Dial, 5o:447; Nation, 93:101; N, Y. Times 
Rev. 16:263, Apr. 30, '11. 

918 Bingham, Hiram. Across South America; an account 

of a journey from Buenos Aires to Lima by way of 
Potosi ; with notes on Brazil, Argentina, Bolivia, Chile 
and Peru. Houghton $3.50 n 

11-11225 Frank but sympathetic comments by a trained observer, on his- 
tory, physical environment, and economic and political conditions 
of the people along the historic trade route between Buenos Aires 
and Lima, Based on a journey taken 1908-9 by train, mule and 
steamer. Maps and numerous halftones including some remarkably 
good double page panoramic views. 
11-14181 H. J. Mozans's Following the conquistadores, along the Andes 
and down the Amazon (Appleton $3 n) is an enthusiastic nar- 
rative of author's journey along the west coast from Panama to 
La Paz and Cuzco, Peru, his exploration of the Amazon and 
examination of Inca ruins. Combines with personal comments, 
and picturesque description many quotations from the literature of 
South America. Map, bibliography and 29 halftones. 
11-30050 Georges Clemenceau's South America of to-day (Putnam $2 n, 
918.2) is the French statesman's impressions of conditions in Ar- 
gentina, Uruguay and Brazil, based on a two months' visit, and 
wittily and illuihinatingly set down. Not illustrated. 
11-35695 A South American country which has received little general at- 
tention is comprehensively and popularly treated in W. H. Koebel's 
Uruguay (South Amer. ser. Scribner $3 n, 918.9) which discusses 
history, physiography, aboriginal tribes, politics, government, man- 
ners and customs, trade, industries, city and ranch life, natural 
resources, etc. Appended tables of financial and commercial sta- 
tistics. Map and 55 halftones. 

Bingham, Bookman, 33:634; Dial, 50^440; Nation, 93:15; Out- 
look, 99:424. 

Mozans, Dial, 51:44; Nation, 93:492; N. Y. Times Rev. 16:541, 
Sept. 10, '11. 

Clemenceau, Annals of Amer. Acad. 41 1336 ; Nation, 94 :267 ; 
Spec. 107:1157, Dec. 30, '11. 

Koebel, Dial, 51:346; Nation, 93:417; Sat R. 112:304. 

918.6 c Edwards, Albert. Panama; the canal, the country, 

and the people. Macmillan $2.50 n 

11-28837 Popular, up-to-date account of the canal and conditions in the 

canal zone. More than half is devoted to a lively resume of the 

history of the* region from Columbus down. Maps and halftones. 

Annals of Amer. Acad. 40:248; Dial, 52:93; Independent, 72:46; 

Lit. Digest, 44:434. 

919.4 c Gunn, Mrs Jeannie {Mrs Aeneas Gunn). We of the 

Never-never. Macmillan $1.50 

A11-1681 Entertaining, lively narrative of a woman's life on a remote 
cattle ranch' in northern Australia. Real people are described 



34 NEW YORK STATE LIBRARY 

under nicknames and many picturesque conversations recorded. 
Illustrated from photographs. 
Nation, 92:297; Outlook, 97:376. 

919.8 a Borup, George. A tenderfoot with Peary. 

Stokes $2.10 n 

11-6719 High spirits, humor, extreme frankness and slang characterize 

this engaging and boyish account of the Peary polar expedition as 
seen by a ^ale graduate, the youngest member of the party. 

A. L, A, Booklist 
Dial, 50:439; Nation, 92:607. 

HISTORY 

See also Children's books, p. 50 

940.1 Cambridge medieval history planned by J. B. Bury. 

8v. V.I The Christian Roman Empire and the founda- 
tion of the Teutonic kingdoms. Macmillan $5 n ea. 

11-29851 First volume of a comprehensive work on medieval European 
history each chapter being written by a specialist in the period and 
each volume provided with an index, maps, chronological tables, 
and a bibliography divided by chapters. This volume covers the 
history of the Roman empire from Constantine almost to Justinian 
and the origin of the Teutons. Some of the sections are prac- 
tically identical with articles in the new Encyclopedia Britannica, 

4-21616 The whole work follows the scheme of the now completed Cam- 
bridge modern history 940.5, planned by Lord Acton 13V., of which 
V. 13 (Macmillan $4 n) consists of genealogical tables, various 
other lists and the general index to the whole work. 

Cambridge medieval, Amer. Hist. Rev. 17:592; Ath. 191 1, 2:727; 
Nation, 94:436; N. Y. Times Rev. 17:68, Feb. 11, *I2; Spec. 108:127, 
Jan. 27, '12. 

Cambridge modern, Amer. Hist. Rev. 17:648; Ath. 191 1, 2:7gj; 
Sat. R. 112:836. 

945 . 09 a Trevelyan, G. M. Garibaldi and the making of Italy. 

Longmans $2.25 n 

11-35882 Follows Garibaldi's defence of the Roman republic and Gari- 
baldi and the Thousand, tracing picturesquely and with consum- 
mate skill the larger military, diplomatic and political events be- 
tween June and November i860, by which the original achieve- 
ments of the Thousand led to the unification of Italy. Maps, 
bibliography, appendixes and numerous halftones, largely from 
photographs. 

n-26653 Another important work covering the same period is W. R. 
Thayer's Life and times of Cavour (Houghton $7.50 n), as much 
a history of Italy from 1848-61 as a biography. Very full and 
scholarly, but equally readable, with many quotations from letters. 
Illustrations, maps and bibliography. 

Trevelyan, Ath. 191 1, 2:513; Dial, 51:465; N. Y. Times Rev. 
16:677, Oct. 29, *ii; Sat. R. 112:647. 

Thayer, Dial, 51:389; Nation, 93^546; N. Y. Times Rev. 16:800, 
Dec 3, '11. 

951.9 Longford, J. H. The story of Korea. Scribner $3 n 

11-35879 An interesting popular account, less accurate historically than 
W. E. Griffis's Corea, the hermit nation, ed. 8, 1907 (Scribner 

f2.5o), but much more readable. Unlike Grifiis, the author is pro- 
apanese in sentiment and presents the other side of the story told 



fefeST BOOKS OF 191 1 35 

by F. A. McKenzie in The tragedy of Korea, 1908 (Dutton 
$1.50 n). Bibliography, 3 maps and 33 halftones. 

A. L. A. Booklist 
Acad. 81 1383 ; Sat. R. 1 12 :432. 

970.6 c Eastman, C. A. ("Ohiyesa"). The soul of the 

Indian. Houghton $1 n 

ii~5343 A cultured Sioux's brief but eloquent interpretation and eulogy 

of the religious life of his ancestors before they knew the white 
man. 

Annals of Amer. Acad. 37 755; Dial, 50:273; Nation, 92:531; 
N. Y. Times Rev. 16:247, Apr. 23, '11. 

973.324 c Perkins, J. B. France in the American Revolution. 

Houghton $2 n 

ii-iooio An authoritative and scholarly study of the diplomatic, financial 
and military relations between France and America during the 
Revolution. 

Amer. Hist. Rev. 17:160; Nation, 92:604; N. Y. Times Rev. 
i6:397» June 25, '11; Outlook, 99 :i37- 

973.7 a Hill, F. T. On the trail of Grant and Lee. (National 

holiday ser.) Appleton $1.50 n 

11-26459 Short but dramatic history of the Civil War given in the life 
stories of the two great generals. Unusually accurate for a popu- 
lar work. 

Lit. Digest, 43:1043; N. Y. Times Rev. 16:741, Nov. 26, '11; 
Outlook, 99 :542. 

BIOGRAPHY 

See also Children's books, p. 51 

Benson, A. C. The leaves of the tree. Putnam $1.50 n 

11-30806 Portraits in finished style, drawn from life, of the personalities 
of Henry Sidgwick, J. K. Stephens, Frederick Myers, Henry 
Bradshaw, Charles Kingsley, Matthew Arnold, Prof. Alfred New- 
ton and Bishops Westcott, Wilkinson, Lightfoot and Words- 
worth. 

Ath. 1911. 2:588; Nation, 93:554; Sat. R. 112, Nov. 25, '11, 
sup. p. 3. 

Butler, W. A. Retrospect of forty years: 1825-65; by 

William Allen Butler; ed. by his daughter, Harriet 

Allen Butler. Scribner $2.50 n 

11-28845 Autobiography of the lawyer-author of Nothing to wear and 
other poems. Describes interestingly life in Albany, Washington 
and New York to the end of the Civil War. Illustrated from 
family portraits. 

Dial, 52:135; Lit. Digest, 44:540; Nation, 94:113. 

Carpenter, W. Boyd. Some pages of my life. 

Scribner $3.75 n 

A12-300 Not formal autobiography; tells little of the career of this dis- 

tinguished English bishop, but consists of delightful, rambling 
reminiscences of childhood, acquaintance with Queen Victoria, 
Tennyson and others, family anecdotes and amusing stories. Six 
portraits on dark mounts. 

Outlook, 100:378; Spec. 108:61, Jan. 13, '12. 



36 NEW YORK STATE LIBRARY 

Ferrero, Guglielmo. The women of the Caesars. 

Century $2 n 

11-27794 Graphic picture of life in ancient Rome given through brilliant 
studies of the characters and careers of the Emperor Augustus and 
his descendants, especially the women. Fully illustrated. Re- 
• printed from the Century, 

Ath. 1911, 2:619; Dial, 5i:397; Nation. 93:603; Outlook, 99784. 

b Garrison. Swift, Lindsay. William Lloyd Garrison. 

(Amer. crisis biog,) Jacobs $1.25 n 

11-12519 Compact but interesting life of the great abolitionist, tracing the 
history of the antislavery movement and giving sympathetic but 
discriminating judgment of his character and influence. Based on 
the four-volume biography by his children. Chronology, index and 
bibliography. 

Nation, 93:35; N. Y. Times Rev. 16:518, Aug. 27, '11; Outlook, 
98:1012. 

Gouvemeur, M. C. (Mrs S. L. Gouverneur, jr). 

As I remember. Appleton $2 n 

11-24385 Personal reminiscences of social life in New York, Washington 
and Maryland in the forties, fifties, and sixties, and less fully to 
present day. Her acquaintance included John Quincy Adams, 
Irving, " Dolly " Madison, N. P. Willis, Horace Greeley, Edward 
Everett, Charles Sumner, and other distinguished names. 

11-27488 Social .life in New York City in the last quarter of the nine- 
teenth century is entertainingly discussed in Mrs Constance Cary 
Harrison's Recollections grave and 5roy( Scribner $2.50 n), but the 
chief interest clusters around her Virginia life before and during 
the Civil War, and her contributions about prominent people, par- 
ticularly Jefferson Davis. 

Gouverneur, Dial, 51:258; Lit. Digest, 43:808; Nation, 93:525. 
Harrison, Dial, 51:468; Outlook. 99:878; Nation, 94:162; Spec. 
108 :725, May 4, '12. 

b Harte. Merwin, H. C. Life of Bret Harte. 

Houghton $3 n 

11-25559 Authoritative and readable, showing discriminating insight into 
the author's character and the quality of his work. Discusses early 
conditions in California with a view to proving the truth of Harte's 
portrayals. 

Bookman, 34:430; Dial, 51:290; Nation, 94:164; N. Y. Times 
Rev. 16:648, Oct. 22, *ii. 

c Hueffer, F. M. Memories and impressions. 

Harper $1.60 n 

ii~9563 Intimate, entertaining, often iconoclastic anecdotes of Ford 

Madox Brown, author's grandfather, the Rossettis, Liszt, Holman 
Hunt, Whistler, Ruskin, William Morris and others, including 
author's lamentations over the decay of arts and letters. Pub- 
lished in England under title Ancient lights and certain new reflec- 
tions. 16 portraits. 

Ath. 191 1, 1:567; Dial, 50:345; Nation, 92:581; N. Y. Times 
Rev. 16:277, May 7, '11-, North Amer. Rev. 194:468; Sat. R. 
111:555. 

a Jewett, S. O. Letters of Sarah Orne Jewett. 

Houghton $1.50 n 

1 1-26427 These letters, addressed to various friends in America and 
England, have the unusual qualities which give distinction to Miss 



BEST IBOOKS OF I9II 37 

Jewett's stories. They are full of character and charm, and reveal 
her love of nature, impressions of foreign travel, literary likings, 
keen criticism of books, and a rare capacity for friendship. 

Pittsburgh 
Dial, 51:337; Nation, 93:344; Outlook, 99:785. 

Johnson, T. L. My story; ed. by E. J. Hauser. 

Huebsch $2 n 

11-35975 This vivid, informal record of boyhood, inventions, business 
success, conversion to the single tax theory, fight against privilege, 
work in Congress and as mayor of Cleveland, 1901-9, 9ffers a 
convincing case for its author's often-questioned sincerity and 
personal disinterestedness. Portraits and other halftones. 

Bookman, 35:89; Dial, 51:332; Nation, 94:ii5; N. Y. Times 
Rev. 16:848, Dec. 24, '11; Outlook, 100:143. 

Lacombe. Hughes, Katherine. Father Lacombe, the 
black-robe voyageur. Moflfat $2.50 n 

11-30051 A picturesque account of Canada in the last half of the nine- 
teenth century, as well as an enthusiastic portrayal of a lovable 
character, a French Canadian priest, missionary to the Indians 
since 1849. Illustrated. 

Dial, 52:26; Lit. Digest, 44:340; N. Y. Times Rev. 16:853, Dec. 

31, 'II. 

La Farge. Cortissoz, Royal. John La Farge. 

Houghton $4 n 

11-11181 Authorized memoir by an intimate friend with whom La Farge 
collaborated. Presents in felicitous style the subtle and vivid 
thinker, the fastidious talker, the delightful man of the world, sac- 
rificing criticism of his stained glass work and painting to an 
affectionate portrayal of his personality. Nation, 92:513- I5 
photogravures, including 3 portraits and reproductions of paint- 
ings. 

11-27318 Another notable artist biography is The life and works of 
Winslow Homer (Houghton $6 n) by W. H. Downes, a friend, 
critic and enthusiastic admirer. Draws artist's portrait from let- 
ters and personal reminiscences, and traces chronologically and in 
detail his development as the " first American painter." Bibliog- 
raphy, lists of pictures, portraits and about 100 reproductions in 
sepia of paintings and sketches. 

Cortissoz, Bookman, 33:432; Dial, 50:385; Internat. Studio, 
43: sup. p. 90, June *ii, 44: sup. p. 52, Sept. *ii; Nation, 92:513; 
N. Y. Times Rev. 16:360, June 11, '11. 

Downes, Dial, 51:479; Internat. Studio, 45: sup. p. 48, Dec. '11. 

c Lamed, J. N. A study of greatness in men. 

Houghton $1.25 n 

11-4953 Fresh, stimulating analyses of character and motive, marked by 

high ideals. Asserts that greatness depends upon the combination 
of great endowments, great opportunities, and great motives, and 
tests by this definition the lives of Napoleon, Cromwell, Washing- 
ton and Lincoln. 

Annals of Amer. Acad. 38:289; Dial, 50: 311; Lit. Digest, 
42:798. 

c Lowell, Stewart, W. R. The philanthropic work of 

Josephine Shaw Lowell. Macmillan $2 n 

11-28795 Biographical sketch, selected public papers and private letters 
of a dominating personality in New York State charitable and 



38 NEW YORK STATE 'LIBRARY 

correctional work, whose life was consecrated to industrial and 
social betterment. By the president of the New York State Board 
of Charities. 

Nation, 94:340; Spec. 108:132, Jan. 27, '12; Survey, 27:1342. 

b Luther, Smith, Preserved. The life and letters of 

Martin Luther. Houghton $3.50 n 

11-15608 Scholarly biography embodying the results of recent research 
and emphasizing Luther's personality as much as his theology. 
Bibliography and chronological table. Illustrations from portraits. 
11-28669 A. C. McGiffert's Martin Luther, the man and his work (Cen- 
tury $3 n) is an equally accurate, but shorter and more popular 
treatment rewritten from articles in the Century, more fully illus- 
trated and attractive in appearance. 

Both, Dial, 51:528; Nation, 93:578. 

Smith, Ath. 1911, 2:551; Outlook, 98:509. 

McGiffert, Outlook, 99:784. 

Poumies de la Siboutie, Pierre. Recollections of a 
Parisian under six sovereigns, two revolutions and a 
republic ( 1 789-1 863 ) ; tr. by Lady Theodora David- 
son. Putnam $3 n 

ii~35963 Diary and reminiscences of a Parisian doctor, a shrewd ob- 
server in an exciting period, giving many anecdotes of distin- 
guished people and a vivid picture of the times. 

Ath. 1911, 1:715; Dial, 51:469; Nation, 93^555; Spec. 107: 249, 
Aug. 12, '11. 

Ruskin. Benson, A. C. Ruskin ; a study in personality. 

Putnam $1.50 n 

Ii~i5332 A satisfactory short biography, composed of seven lectures de- 
livered at the University of Cambridge. Gives in animated style 
the main events of Ruskin's life with criticism of his works, but is 
mainly a sympathetic though not overlaudatory character study. 

12-35 180/2 E. T. Cook's Life of John Ruskin, 2v. (Macmillan $7 n) is a 
definitive, authorized biography founded on Ruskin's diary and 
letters from which it quotes copiously, treating of his life, works 
and character. Portraits. 

Benson, Ath. 1911, i:599; Dial, 51:107; Nation, 93:224; Sat. 
R. 112:202. 

Cook, Acad. 81:821; Ath. 191 1, 2:653; Dial, 51:522; Oudook 
(Eng.) 28:790. 

Stowe. Stowe, C. E. & L. B. Harriet Beecher Stowe ; 

the story of her life by her son and her grandson. 

Houghton $1.50 n 

11-12848/2 Valuable for family reminiscences and interesting for side 
lights on the political events of the Civil War period. Her early 
life in her father's strict Calvinistic household is especially well 
described. A centennial anniversary volume, and rather a study 
9f her character and personality than of her literary work. 8 
illustrations, including portraits. 

Dial, 50:469; Nation, 93:i43; N. Y. Times Rev. 16:363, June 
I, '11; Outlook, 98:465. 

Thomas. Thomas, Mrs R. F. Memoirs of Theodore 
Thomas. Moffat $3 n 

1 1-29847/2 Valuable contribution to the annals of music as well as a sym- 
pathetic and most satisfactory portrayal, by his widow, of Amer- 



BEST BOOKS OF I9II 39 

ica's foremost musical conductor, whose invincible purpose was the 
musical education of the people. Drawn from intimate personal 
knowledge and all other available sources. 28 illustrations, includ- 
ing portraits. 

Bookman, 34=533; Dial, 51=4^2; Nation, 93:503. 

Tolstoi, Rolland, Remain. Tolstoy; tr. by Bernard 
Miall. Dutton $1.50 n 

11-27476 Psychological study of the various phases through which 
Tolstoi passed and the reflection of these phases in his works. 
Holland is so far (1911) the only man of creative genius who has 
given us his conception of the creative genius of Tolstoi. He 
speaks with full understanding and therein, perhaps, lie the charm 
and value of his work. Athenaeum, 1911, 2:768 

12-39007 Paul Birukoff's Life of Tolstoy (Cassell $1.50 n) is condensed 
from author's three volume work in Russian on which Tolstoi col- 
laborated. A brief, sympathetic, first-hand sketch of life and appre- 
ciation of spiritual development. 18 illustrations, including several 
portraits; list of works. 

ii~29393 Complete data may be found in N. H. Dole's Life of Lyof N. 
Tolstoi (Crowell $2 n), which is based on the work of Birukoff, 
Maude, and minor biographers. Facts and interpretations are pre- 
sented in a sincere and kindly spirit, but in a rather bald style. 
Portrait and 30 halftones. Appendixes on chronology of life and 
writings, Tolstoian colonies, and Tolstoi in the eyes of his con- 
temporaries. 

Rolland, Acad. 81 : 791; Ath. 191 1, 2:768; Nation, 94:237; North 
Amer. Rev. 195:135. 

Birukoff, Acad. 81:690; Ath. 1911, 2: 518; Nation, 94:237; 
N. Y. Times Rev. 17:71, Feb. 11, '12. 
Dole, Nation, 94:237. 

Wagner, W. R. Family letters of Richard Wagner ; tr. 
by W. A. Ellis. Macmillan $1.85 n 

ii~35977/i Intimate letters (1832-74) to his mother, sisters and other rela- 
tives, but chiefly to his half-sister Cecilie and her husband, 
Eduard Avenarius. Full of family affection and interesting per- 
sonal detail. Pittsburgh 

11-16280 Though a torso (Wagner died in 1883 and this work closes with 
1864), My life, 2v. (Dodd $8.50 n.) takes its place among the 
world's great autobiographies. Author tells a plain tale, sparing 
himself no more than others. He gives glimpses into the work- 
shop of his j?enius and throws a flood of light on the musical con- 
ditions of his time. There are many comments on great musi- 
cians — Liszt, Schumann, Mendelssohn, Berlioz, Meyerbeer, Franz, 
Billow, Saint-Saens and a host of others. Nation, 92:536. 2 
portraits. 

Family letters, Ath. 191 1, 2:398; Nation, 93:427; Outlook 
(Eng.) 28:666. 

My life, Ath. 1911, 2:21; Bookman, 33'53^', Dial, 51:10; Nation, 
93:85; N. Y. Times Rev. 16:459, July 23, '11; Spec. 107:315, 
Aug. 26, '11. 

Wazan, Emily, shareefa of. My life story. 

Longmans $3.50 n 

12-35183 An extremely interesting acccount of the experiences of an 
Englishwoman who in 1873 married a Moor, and still lives in 
Tangier. Describes the customs of the people and her own family 
life. 

Ath. 1912, 1:36; Spec. 108:516, Mar. 30, '12. 



40 



NEW YORK STATE LIBRARY 



Welles, Gideon. Diary of Gideon Welles. 3v. 

Houghton $io n 

11-28338 The private diary kept by the Secretary of the Navy in the 
cabinets of Lincoln and Johnson, 1861-69, giving the unvarnished 
opinions of an able, upright, though frequently prejudiced man 
on public men and events during the Civil War and Reconstruc- 
tion periods. Illustrations from portraits. Appeared in part in 
the Atlantic. 

Dial, 51:248; Lit. Digest, 43:921; Nation, 93:598. 

William I, prince of Orange. Putnam, Ruth. William, 

the Silent, prince of Orange [i 533-1 584] and the 

revolt of the Netherlands. (Heroes of the nations). 

Putnam $1.50 n 

11-15039 Scholarly and interesting biography based on author's two 
volume work (1895) but rewritten and embodying the results of 
later researches. Well illustrated from portraits, old prints and 
medals. Maps and bibliography. 
Dial, 5I:3CX); Sat. R. 113:307. 



FICTION 

See also Children's books, p. 51-53 

c Audoux, Marguerite. Marie-Claire; tr. by J. N. 
Raphael. Doran $1.20 n 

11-1929 Written by a Parisian seamstress and really the story of her 

own youth — her childhood as an orphan in a convent asylum and 
later years on a farm as servant and shepherdess. Told with con- 
summate simplicity and lack of self -consciousness. 

Bookman, 33:98; Nation, 92:216; N. Y. Times Rev. 16:7, Jan. 
7, '11 & 16:58, Feb. 5. '11. 

Bacheller, I. A. Keeping up with Lizzie. Harper $1 n 

1 1.-3473 Socrates Potter, " specialist in deeds, titles, epigrams and witti- 

cisms," discourses in the vernacular on the struggle of his village 
to keep the social pace set by the prosperous grocer's daughter and 
philosophizes on the nobility of work and motherhood and honest 
simplicity. 

Bookman, 33:328; Nation, 92:343; N. Y. Times Rev. 16:171, 
Mar. 26, '11. 

Benson, E. F. Margery. Doubleday $1.20 n 

10-18882 Sympathetic story of the n^arriage of a radiant, warm-hearted 
young English girl and a self-centered archeologist and writer. 
Faithful in delineation of character, fine and wholesome in tone. 
The English title Jugpernant, suggests its painful qualities. 

Ath. 191 1, 2:484; Bookman, 34:311; N. Y. Times Rev. 16:656, 
Oct. 22, '11. 

b Buchan, John. The great diamond pipe. 

Dodd $1.20 n 

10-23203 Tale of adventure both exciting and well written. A young 
Scotchman goes to South Africa as storekeeper, and becomes in- 
volved in an uprising of natives. English title, Prester John. 

Bookman, 33:85; N. Y. Times Rev. 16:63, Feb. 5, '11; Sptc. 
105:322, Aug. 27, 'la 



BEST BOOKS OF I9II 41 

a Buckrose, Mrs J. E. Down our street. 

Putnam $1.35 n 

11-35697 Leisurely story of the ups and downs of life in a shabby street 
in an English city. The discernment and discrimination of the 
telling make commonplace characters alive and lovable. 

Nation, 93:58; N. Y. Times Rev. 16:369, June 11, '11; Spec. 
106:326, Mar. 4, '11. 

Burnett, Mrs F. H. The secret garden. Stokes $1.35 n 

11-21580 Though sentimental, highly improbable and irritating in its ab- 
normal situations, this fantastic story of the adventures of three 
children in an overgrown, walled-in Yorkshire garden is so full of 
literary charm and the freshness, delight and healing atmosphere 
of out-of-doors that it pleases many readers, old and young. 

Ath. 1911, 2:621; Bookman, 34:183; Nation, 93:290; N. Y. Times 
Rev. 16:526, Sept, 3, '11; Outlook, 99:136. 

Cameron, Margaret (Mrs H. C. Lewis). The pretender 

person. Harper $1.30 n 

11-26607 Light, amusing travel novel, in the form of letters, relating the 
story of some tangled love affairs. Mexican in background, its 
descriptions of sights and scenes are of interest to the fireside 
traveler and the genuine tourist. 16 halftones. 
Outlook, 99:680. 

Chesterton, G. K. The innocence of Father Brown. 

Lane $1.30 n 

11-25052 A dozen ingenious detective stories, their novelty lying in the 
fact that seemingly impenetrable mysteries are solved by a stupid 
looking little priest who has been made wise in wickedness 
through the confessions of criminals. 

Cath. World, 94:101; Nation, 93:419; Sat. R. 112:242. 

Child, R. W. The man in the shadow. 

Macmillan $1.25 n 

11-25089 Eighteen stories of American life, excellent in workmanship, 
often tense and dramatic, and inspiring in their ideals. 
Bookman, 34:444; Nation, 94:112; Outlook, 99:542. 

Comer of Harley Street, The: being some familiar 
correspondence of Peter Harding, M.D. 

Houghton $1.25 n 

11-35698 Reflections upon present-day life and thought in the form of 
letters from a middle-aged London physician to his family and 
friends. Wise, well written and connected by an extremely slender 
thread of romance. 

Atlantic, 108:558; Dial, 51:21; N. Y. Times Rev. 16:448, July 
16, '11. 

a Deland, Mrs M. W. C. The iron woman. 

Harper $1.35 n 

ii~3575i Story of passions, love and spiritual conflict, involving the 
■ question of the permanence of the marriage bond and proving the 
"somehow good" of Helena Richie's life. 

Dial, 51:473; Nation, 93:289; N. Y. Times Rev. 16:606, Oct. 
8, '11; North Amer. Rev. 194 :92i ; Outlook, 99 :628. 



42 NEW YORK STATE LIBRARY 

De Morgan, W. F. A likely story. Holt $1.35 n 

11-28739 A tale of modern London is ingeniously combined with a ro- 
mance of medieval Italy by means of a talking portrait, which 
helps to solve all difficulties. 

Ath. 191 1, 2:621; N. Y. Times Rev. 16:770, Dec. 3, *ii; Spec. 
107:862, Nov. 18, '11. 

a Farnol, Jeff ery. The broad highway. Little $1.35 n 

11-472 Pure romance, as impossible as a fairy tale but refreshingly 

spontaneous and original, in which a disinherited young English- 
man of the early nineteenth century takes to the road with 10 
shillings in his pocket and after many adventures wins fortune 
and a lady. 

Atlantic, 108:565; Dial, 50:267; Nation, 92:373. 

c The money moon. Dodd $1.25 n 

11-29082 A modern idyll in which a young American millionaire, sup- 
posing himself heartbroken, sets out on a walking tour through 
England and is soon engaged by a delightful small boy to help 
find a buried treasure and save the ancestral acres for his charm- 
ing aunt. 

Bookman, 34:528; -Dial, 52:23; N. Y. Times Rev. 16:771, Dec. 

3, 'II. 

h Fuller, Anna. Later Pratt portraits. Putnam $1.50 n 

11-7262 Eleven short stories which sketch the characters of the grand- 

children and great-grandchildren of " Old Lady Pratt " against 
the background of a New England suburb in quite as realistic 
and sympathetic a manner as Pratt portraits portrayed her 
children. 

Atlantic, 108:558; Nation, 92;479; N. Y. Times Rev. 16:415, 
July 2, '11; Outlook, 98:41. 

Galsworthy, John. The patrician. Scribner $1.35 n 

11-5187 Masterly portrayal of the power of caste in an aristocratic 

English family and its effect upon the unconventional love affairs 
of the interesting and somewhat rebellious grandson and grand- 
daughter. Marked by sympathy, penetrating characterization and 
a brilliant style. 

Atlantic, 108:559; Dial, 50:442; Nation, 92:399; N. Y. Times 
Rev. 16:154, Mar. 19, '11; Sat. R. 111:337; Spec. 106:408, Mar. 
18, 'II. 

Gillmore, Mrs I. H. Janey. Holt $1.25 n 

11-27848 Clever and sympathetic sketches recording the ambitions and 
speculations of an imaginative little girl; her attempt to renounce 
dolls that she may grow up sooner, her solution of the problems 
of birth and death, etc. 
Outlook, 99:788. 

Glasgow, E. A. G. The miller of Old Church. 

Doubleday $1.35 n 

11-12503 Story of latter-day Virginia, where the old aristocracy and the 
advancing sons of the "poor whites" are coming into new rela- 
tions. Intimate knowledge of conditions, flashes of humor, and 
quotable sayings compensate for a rather disagreeable plot. 

Bookman, 33 :53i ; Dial. 51:51; Nation, 93:33; N. Y. Times 
Rev. 16:414, July 2, '11 ; North Amer. Rev. 194:302, 



fifiST BOOK§ OF 1011 



43 



Grenfell, Sir W. T. Down north on the Labrador. 

Revell $1 n 

11-29622 Collection of story sketches of Labrador life on sea and land, 
based on author^s experiences as missionary physician, and re- 
flecting his fine and optimistic spirit, sympathy and humor. 
N. Y. Times Rev, 16:695, Nov. 5, *ii. 

Grimshaw, B. E. When the red gods call. 

Moflfat $1.35 n 

11-11319 Gripping tale of the career of the Kiplingesque hero whose 

grim and tender adventures are in harmony with the highly 

colored New Guinea setting, faithfully and convincingly described. 

Ath. 191 1, 2:124; Bookman, 34:80; Sat. R. 112:178; Spec. 

107:221, Aug. 5, *ii. 

c Hall, E. V. S. G. Tallentyre, pseud. Bassett; a 
village chronicle. Moflfat $1.25 n 

10-20610 Pretty, well-written study of an English country town in the 
forties. A slight thread of narrative connects character sketches 
of the squire and his wife, the old and the young doctor, the 
parson and others. 

11-35362 Appealing to a somewhat similar taste for desultory sketching, 
M. C. E. Wemyss in People of Pop ham (Houghton $1.20 n) por- 
trays the characters of a modern English village. The narrator, 
an attractive young woman, observing and sympathetic, records 
love affairs, anecdotes of children, etc., with philosophic reflection 
and humor. 

Hall, Ath. 1910, 2:178; Nation, 92:318; N. Y. Times Rev. 
16:312, May 21, '11; Sat. R. 110:398. 

Wemyss, Nation, 93:34; Spec. 106:737, May 13, '11. 

c Hannay, J. O. " G. A. Birmingham," pseud. Spanish 
gold. Dor an $1.20 n 

12-35374 Hilarious and original Irish tale in which an engaging and un- 
conventional young curate baffles all rivals in a search for buried 
treasure. 

Dial, 52:133; Nation, 94:135; N. Y. Times Rev. 17:40, Jan. 
28, '12. 

a Harker, Mrs L. A. Master and maid. 

Scribner $1.25 n 

10-30735 Story of a pretty, impulsive Irish girl and the disturbance she 
creates in an English boys school which she visits. 

Ath, 1910, 2:661; N. Y. Times Rev. 16:64, Feb. 5, '11; Spec. 
105:1034, Dec, 10, '10. 

a Harrison, H. S. Queed. Houghton $1.35 n 

11-10951 Marked individuality stamps this record of a self -centered, 
academic sociologist's physical and mental evolution into a very 
human man and a power in a southern city. A charming heroine, 
and well-drawn minor characters contribute to the interest. 

Adapted from A. L. A. Booklist. 
Atlantic, 108:562; Dial, 51:49; Nation, 92:580; Outlook, 98:127. 

Hay, Ian, pseud, (Ian Hay Beith). A safety match. 

Houghton $1.20 n 

1 1-26952 Story of the marriage of the daughter of a poor English clergy- 
man to a wealthy manufacturer twice her age. Both the humor- 



44 



NEW YORK STATE LIBRARY 



ous account of child life at the rectory and the more serious 
working out of the marriage problem are freshly and interest- 
ingly handled. 

Dial, 51:472; Outlook, 99:635. 

Hinkson, Mrs Katharine (Tynan). Princess Katharine. 

Duffield $1.20 n 

11-1964 Well-written, sentimental story of modern Ireland, of a young 

girl's loyalty to a mother cursed with the love of drink. Ends 
happily. Excellent Irish talk and some good characterization. 
Nation, 92:581; N. Y. Times Rev. 16:243, Apr. 16, *ii. 

a Hunting, H. G. A hand in the game. Holt $1.25 n 

11-27849 Good detective story with a cleverly complicated plot and a 
lively romance. The problem is not, Who committed the murder? 
but, Where are the valuable papers? 

Huzard, Antoinette (de Bergevin). "Colette Yver," 
pseud. Love vs. law. (Les dames du palais) ; tr. from 

the French by Mrs Bradley Oilman. Putnam $1.35 n 

11-27300 Clever problem novel concerned with the "new woman" move- 
ment in France and its effect upon marriage. Possesses much in- 
terest also as a love story and in its pictures of law court life 
and scenes in the Palais de Justice, Paris. 
Chic. Post, Feb. 2, *I2, p. 3. 

Johnston, Mary. The long roll. Houghton $1.40 n 

11-13141 Less a story than a minute study of " Stonewall" Jackson's 
character, with scenes from his campaigns vividly described from 
the Confederate point of view. Maps on end papers. 

Dial, 51:50; Nation, 92:530; N. Y. Times Rev. 16:419, July 
2, '11; Outlook, 98:146. 

c Kester, Vaughan. The prodigal judge. 

Bobbs-Merrill $1.25 n 

11-4774 Rambling story of North Carolina and Tennessee in the 

thirties, in which adventures and humorous character drawing 
center about the figures of a small boy and a disreputable but 
lovable judge. 

Bookman, 33:547; Dial, 50:269; Nation, 92:373; N. Y. Times 
Rev. 16:187, Apr. 2, '11. 

Lincoln, J. C. Cap'n Warren's wards. 

Appleton $1.30 n 

11-25432 Shrewd, kindly Captain Elisha, of Cape Cod, takes up re- 
luctantly but capably his duties as guardian of his brother's chil- 
dren, a snobbish, city-bred nephew and niece. The ensuing story, 
hackneyed in plot, is fresh as character study. 

Lit. Digest, 43:866; Nation, 93:549; N. Y. Times Rev. 16:720, 
Nov. 12, '11. 

b Locke, W. J. The glory of Clementina. Lane $1.30 n 

11-19661 In this story of the humanizing of a rough and dowdy portrait 
painter of brilliant attainments, and an eccentric widower, fa- 
miliar elements of popular fiction are worked naturally into a 
romance full of novelty, charm and whimsicality. 

Atlantic, 108 :567 ; Bookman, 34 '.76 ; Dial, 51 :202 ; Nation, 
93:143; N. Y. Times Rev. 16:481, Aug. 6, '11; Sat. R. 112:146. 



BEST BOOKS OF I9II 45 

Mitchell, S. W. John Sherwood, ironmaster. 

Century $1.20 n 

11-12056 Reflective, quiet story (with a single sensational incident) of 
an overworked business man's enforced retreat to the Maine coast, 
where he gains both his lost health and a new outlook on life. 

Atlantic, 108:566; Bookman, 34:99; Dial, 51:48; Nation, 93:122; 
N. Y. Times Rev. 16:483, Aug. 6, *ii. 

b Norris, Kathleen. Mother. Macmillan $1 n 

11-26415 Tender, appealing little story contrasting the Hfe of a "busy" 
society woman and the self-denying, joyous service of the mother 
of a large family of narrow income, whose charming but rebel- 
lious eldest daughter comes to realize the beauty and the duty of 
motherhood. 

Bookman, 34:437; Cath. World, 94:387; Independent, 71:1145; 
Outlook, 99:679; Nation, 93:605. 

b Packard, F. L. On the iron at Big Cloud. 

Crowell $1.25 n 

11-20544 Fifteen vigorous, realistic stories of railroad men on the Rocky 
mountain division of a transcontinental line. 
N. Y. Times Rev. 16:560, Sept. 17, '11. 

c Pearson, E. L. The believing years. 

Macmillan $1.25 n 

11-24405 Connected sketches, reminiscent in form, of experiences of 
small boys in a New England town. Very true and delightful in 
their reflection of boy life and views of life. Published in part 
in Outlook, 

Bookman, 34 :449 ; Nation, 94 :2i i ; N. Y. Times Rev. 16 :763, 
Dec 3, '11. 

Sedgwick, A. D. Tante. Century $1.30 n 

12-48 Brilliant study of egotism in a famous woman pianist, who 

feeds on adulation and takes diabolically subtle measures against 
any who refuse it. Deals dramatically with a young girl's blind 
adoration and its effect upon her married life. 

Bookman, 34:655; Dial, 52:323; Nation, 94:262; Spec. 107:907, 
Nov. 25, '11. 

Smith, F. H. Kennedy Square. Scribner $1.50 

11-22130 Leisurely story of a double estrangement between father and 
son and two lovers. Pictures with warm and tender sentiment 
the social life of Baltimore in the fifties, with its " before-the- 
war" standards of courtesy and honor. 

Dial, 51:472; Nation, 93:219; N. Y. Times Rev. 16:527, Sept. 
3, '11; Outlook, 99:136- 

c Snedeker, Mrs C. D. O. The coward of Thermopylae. 

Doubleday $1.20 n 

11-9233 Unusually appealing historical story of Aristodemos, who alone 

of the Three Hundred came back from Thermopylae and was 
taunted as a coward. Full of the color and atmosphere of ancient 
Greece. 

Bookman, 33:418; Nation, 93:191; N. Y. Times Rev. 16:443, 
July 16, *ii; Outlook, 98:311. 



46 NEW YORK STATE LIBRARY 

Thanet, Octave, pseud, (Alice French). Stories that 
end well. Bobbs-Merrill $1.25 n 

11-22546 Eleven stories, American in situation, with satisfying but not 
always conventionally " happy " endings ; characterized by whole- 
some sentiment, optimism and good workmanship. 
N. Y. Times Rev. 16:748, Nov. 26, '11. 

b Vorse, Mrs M. M. H. The very little person. 

Houghton $1 n 

11-11216 Entertaining and sympathetic account of the advent and early 
months of a first baby, of her own development and the way in 
which her parents develop under her tuition. Excellent draw- 
ings. Appeared in Woman's Home Companion. 

Independent, 70:1116; Lit. Digest, 42:1212; N. Y. Times Rev. 
16:484, Aug. 6, *ii. 

b Ward, Mrs M. A. A. (Mrs Humphrey Ward). The 
case of Richard Meynell. Doubleday $1.35 n 

1 1-2765 1 Interest lies chiefly in the serious and admirable portrayal of 
the conflict between modernism and orthodoxy in the Church of 
England, and is not enhanced by a rather melodramatic subplot. 
Characters from Robert Elsmere reappear. 

Dial, 52:22; Nation, 93:604; N. Y. Times Rev. 16:819, Dec. 
10, *ii; Spec. 107:785, Nov. 11, '11. 

Watts, Mrs M. S. The legacy. Macmillan $1.50 

11-9942 A leisurely Ohio story of the late nineteenth century, Thack- 

erayan in manner, describing the childhood and married life of a 
heroine whose family has seen better days and picturing her strug- 
gle against poverty and inherited similarity to a beautiful, unprin- 
cipled great-grandmother. 

Atlantic, 108:561; Dial, 50:444; Nation, 92:478. 
Webster, H. K. The girl in the other seat. 

Appleton $1.25 n 

11-10637 Lively, romantic automobile story concerning an inventor's im- 
periled secret, a Vanderbilt cup race and a charming girl. 
Dial, 51:50; N. Y. Times Rev. 16.2,76, June 11, '11. 

White, S. E. The adventures of Bobby Orde. 

Doubleday $1.20 n 

11-27653 Rare story of a young boy*s mind and ambitions, relating with 
discerning humor his experiences in love, log-walking, with print- 
ing-press and rifle. 

Bookman, 34:448; N. Y. Times Rev. 16:683, Oct. 29, *ii. 

Wister, Owen. Members of the family. 

Macmillan $1.25 n 

11-10638 Stories of cowboys and ranch life in Wyoming: Happy-Teeth, 
Spit-cat creek. In the back, Timberline, The gift horse. Extra 
dry, Where it was. The drake who had means of his own. The 
Virginian, Scipio Le Moyne and other characters from Mr 
Wister's earlier stories reappear. Interesting biographical preface. 
Bookman, ZZ'AZ7\ Independent, 70:1224; Nation, 92:556; Out- 
look, 98:145. 



BEST BOOKS OF I9II 



47 



Wright, H. B. The winning of Barbara Worth. 

Bk Supply $1.30 n 

11-22022 Story of rival reclamation companies in the Colorado desert, 
showing author's first-hand and sympathetic familiarity with the 
country. 

Bookman, 34:97; Dial, 51:199; N. Y. Times Rev. 16:504, Aug. 
20, '11. 

CHILDREN'S BOOKS 

220 Johnston, J. H. Who-was-it? stories. Badger 50c n 

11-30437 Thirty-nine stories from the Old and New Testaments, simply 
and acceptably told without mention of names, so that the char- 
acters may be guessed at the conclusion of each narrative. Useful 
for the family story hour and the primary Sunday school. 12 
illustrations. 

333 b Price, O. W. The land we live in ; the boy's book of 

conservation. Small $1.50 n 

11-24157 Interesting, authoritative discussion of our forests, lands, waters, 
minerals and wild life, pointing out the necessity of preserving 
them and how the reader may cooperate. Both its information 
and 136 unusually fine photographs will attract readers of all 
ages. 

Outlook, 99:881. 

369 Boy Scouts of America. The ofificial handbook for 

boys. Boy Scouts of Amer. see n 

11-21191 This is the completed form of the manual, which was pre- 
ceded by two tentative issues. It embodies the organization of 
Baden-Powell adapted to the United States and contains articles 
by Seton and others on natural history, camping etc. Bibliog- 
raphies. 

394 Dier, J. C. comp. Children's book of Christmas. 

Macmillan $1.50 n 

11-27328 Anthology containing several familiar Christmas carols and 
poems and many prose selections from various writers describing 
Christmas customs in many lands. Illustrated by 8 colored plates 
and 21 halftones, chiefly reproductions of well-known paintings. 
Lit. Digest, 43:1042. 

428.6 Van Sickle, J. H., Seegmiller, Wilhelmina, & Jenkins, 

Frances, ed. Riverside readers. 4v. Houghton, 
Primer, 30c n; ist reader, 3Sc n; 2d reader, 40c n; 
3d reader, 50c n. 

11-35810 Excellent little readers containing well-chosen and graded se- 
lections and adaptations of stories, verse and plays, with some 
simple biograohy and science and tinted line drawings. Not ob- 
trusively textbooks in appearance but each contains at the end a 
vocabulary and suggestions to teachers. 

523 c Baikie, James. Peeps at the heavens. (Peeps at 

science) Macmillan 75c n 

12-39028 Clear, interesting and well illustrated. Almost whollv devoted 
to the solar system. Much superior to the books on birds and 
flowers in this series. 



48 



NEW YORK STATE LIBRARY 



590 



11-20636 



Aii-1327/3 Ellison Hawks*s Stars shown to the children (Shown to the 
children ser. Piatt 90c n) is fuller, almost half being given to 
fixed stars, with charts for identification, and chapters on astron- 
omers and telescopes. Well illustrated also, but less satisfactory 
in style. 

Baikie, Ath. 1911, 2:525; Spec. 107:834, Nov. 18, '11. 

Hawks, Nature, 85 :5o6. 

550 Craig, Sterling. Secrets of the hills and how Ronald 

read them. Crowell $1.50 

12-39031 Elementary principles of geology clearly and entertainingly 
presented for young people in the story of an English ^ boy's 
vacation in Scotland. Well illustrated. 

a Brearley, H. C. Animal secrets told; a book of 
"whys." Stokes $1.50 

Explains the practical value of the peculiar construction and 
position of the eyes, ears, tongues, feet, tails etc. of various 
animals. Scientifically accurate and as interesting to grown people 
as to children. Illustrated from photographs and drawings. 

Lit. Digest, 43:1041. 

604 Hall, A. N. Handicraft for handy boys : practical plans 

for work and play, with many ideas for earning 
money. Lothrop $2 

11-16895/7 Companion volume to author's The hoy craftsman. Offers 
clear, concise directions for making handy house contrivances, 
box and barrel furniture, clock-work toys, brass craft, wireless 
telegraphy outfit, model aeroplanes, arranging a boys' vaudeville 
show, etc. Chapters on workshop, tools, wood working and fin- 
ishing and working drawings. About 560 illustrations including 
halftones and working drawings. Poorly bound. 
Independent, 71:1314; Lit. Digest, 43:1043. 

608 Holland, R. S. Historic inventions. (Historic ser. for 

young people) Jacobs $1.50 n 

11-23819 Sixteen popular, dramatic accounts of great inventors and 
their inventions, including Gutenberg and the printing press, 

Paliss>^ and his enamel, Galileo and the telescope, Arkwright and 

the spinning- jenny, Whitney and the cotton-gin, McCormick and 

the reaper, Marconi and the wireless telegraph, The Wrights and 
the airship, etc. 

Lit. Digest, 43:1043; Nation, 93:519. 

614.84 Jenks, Tudor. The fireman. (What shall I be ser.) 

McClurg $1.25 

11-31145 Brief, simple account of the duties and training of firemen, 
the organization of fire departments in large cities and history of 
their development in this country. 

629.4 ^ Collins, F. A. Second boys' book of model aeroplanes. 

Century $1.20 n 

11-27822 Supplements The boys* book of model aeroplanes by clear, de- 
tailed directions for making up-to-date (1911) models. Fully 
illustrated by workine: drawings and halftones. Includes rules 
for contests, constitution and by-laws for a club, and glossary. 

699 Beard, D. C. Boat-building and boating. Scritner $1 n 

11-26018 Practical book for amateurs. Gives clear and definite instnic- 
tion for making and handling boats from raft to canoe, small 
sailboat and simple, rather crude motor boat. 238 diagrams and 
other drawings. 






BEST BOOKS OF I9II 



49 



782.3 

11-26450 



7gr3 

11-22402 

11-29999 



Chapin, A, A. Konigskinder (Royal children). 

Harper $1.25 

The libretto of Humperdinck's opera developed into a pretty 
fairy tale. The chief motives are given at beginnings and ends 
of chapters. Illustrations from photographs of scenes in the 
opera. 
Lit. Digest, 43:1042. 

KeyeSy A. M. When mother lets us play. (When 
mother lets us) Moffat 75c 

Contains charades, puzzles, conundrums, puppet shows, shadow 
plays, etc. Its stimulation of the child's originality and ingenuity 
is an excellent feature. Illustrated in black and white. 

Of this same series and price is Constance Johnson's When 
mother lets us keep pets (636), which contains simple, practical 
advice to children on selection, care and feeding of dogs, cats, 
rabbits, guinea pigs, mice, squirrels, parrots, canaries and other 
birds, chickens, ponies, goats, aquarium fish and "little wild 
things." Short bibliography. Illustrated attractively from line 
drawings. 

Keyes, N. Y. Times Rev. 16:555, Sept. 17, *ii. 



796 



I 1-12259 



12-39027 



Grinnell, G. B. & Swan, E. L. ed. Harper's camping 
and scouting; an outdoor guide for American boys. 

(Harper's practical bks) Harper $1.75 

A comprehensive compilation of practical, clear and detailed 
information on all phases of camp life, mountaineering, Boy 
Scouts, open-air life for girls, caravaning, fishing, htit and tent 
building, and the organization and conduct of large camps. Suffi- 
ciently comprehensive to serve as a manual for camp directors. 
Well and helpfully illustrated. A. L. A. Booklist 

Lit. Digest, 42:1208; N. Y. Times Rev. 16:416, July 2, *ii; 
Rev. of Rev. 44:123. 

812.49 c Arkwright, Ruth. Brownikins and other fancies; 

music by J. W. Wilson ; illus. by Charles Robinson. 

Stokes $1.50 

Contents: Brownikins; Bibi; St Nicholas; Fairy bells; Baby 
New Year. 

Operettas to be acted by children, excellent in music and text. 
The colored plates on dark brown mounts and small colored line 
drawings are admirable. 

For younger children is Lady Florence Bell's The singing 
circle (Longmans $1.25 n, 784.4), an attractive picture book of 
action songs, other songs and dances, with words and music, and 
diagrams for figures. Includes nursery and .other familiar 
rhymes, with a selection from Stevenson's Child*s garden of 
verses. 

Bell, Spec. 107:1015, Sept. 9, '11. 

Dana, R. H. jr. Two years before the mast. 

Houghton $1.50 n 

Attractive new edition containing author's supplement describ- 
ing a visit to California, introduction and additional chapter by 
his son, appendix describing the parts of a ship, maps, portrait of 
author and index. Illustrated by E. Boyd Smith, with 8 
colored plates and black-and-white chapter head drawings. 

It is not easy to choose between this and the edition of Mac- 
millan ($2 n), which lacks the new material, but has a concluding 



12-35375 



910 

11-35887 



11-26924 



50 NEW YORK STATE LIBRARY 

chapter on the sailor's life by the author and a brief introduction 
by Sir Wilfred GrenfelL 19 effective colored illustrations by 
Charles Pears are rather richer in color and more realistic in 
style than those by E. Boyd Smith. 

914.92 a Perkins, Mrs L. F. The Dutch twins. 

Houghton $1 n 

11-25745 Exceptionally delightful book for little folks, describing child 
life in Holland. Charmingly illustrated from author's crayon 
sketches. 

11-23499 Marta in Holland (Little people everywhere, Little 60c) by 
E. B. MacDonald and Julia Dalrymple, is for children somewhat 
older. It imparts by means of a pleasant little story, information 
about country, people, customs, history and art. 9 good halftones. 

940.1 Tappan, E. M. When knights were bold. 

Houghton $2 n 

11-28668 Spirited and interesting picture of life in castles and manors, 
monasteries and towns during the middle ages. The description 
of the customs of knights is especially full. Many illustrations 
are from contemporary pictures. 

Independent, 71:1311; Lit. Digest, 44:442. 

944 Macgregor, Mary. The story of France told to boys 

and girls. Stokes $2.50 n 

A 1 1-2640 Simply written, interesting history from earliest times to estab- 
lishment of present republic. 20 effective colored illustrations 
and a table of kings. 

Sat. R. 112:212; Spec. 107:528, Oct. 7, *ii. 

FAIRY AND FOLK TALES 

843.89 c France, Anatole, pseud, (J. A. Thibault). Honey- 
bee; a translation by Mrs John Lane; illustrated by 
Florence Lundborg. Lane $1.50 n 

12-801 Tells how lovely, golden-haired Honey-bee and George of 

Blanchelande ventured to the crystal lake, where George was 
captured by the nixies and Honey-bee by the kind dwarfs. Im- 
aginative and poetical in style and pervaded by a humorous and 
wise philosophy. The illustrations, artistic in conception and col- 
oring, are very satisfying. 

Acad. 81 :sup. Dec. 9, '11, p. 7; Outlook (Eng.) 28:752; Spec. 
107:935, Dec. 2, '11. 

398.2 Grimm, J. L. K. & W. K. The fairy tales of the 

brothers Grimm; illus. by Arthur Rackham; tr. by 
Mrs Edgar Lucas. Doubleday $1.50 n 

Wio-i 77 A good selection from Grimm's tales, with 12 fascinating col- 
ored illustrations and 55 in black and white. 

839.7369 Lagerlof, S. O. L. Further adventures of Nils. 

Doubleday $1.20 n 

11-24098 Continues The wonderful adventures of Nils in 22 freshly 
and vividly imagined stories. Nils, once an idle, cruel boy, is 
finally restored to his family, his character transformed by his 
flight with wild geese over Sweden. Reflects love of country and 
Swedish life and customs. 
Bookro*in, 34:555. 






BEST BOOKS OF I9I I 



SI 



823.89 b Leamy, Edmund. The golden spears and other fairy 

tales. FitzGerald $i n 

11-31506 Seven fairy tales founded on Irish folk-lore, told for children 
in colloquial, but poetic language, with a true zest for valor and 
magic, fairies and princesses. First American edition of an 
English book. 

Bookman, 34:558; Lit. Digest, 44:28; N. Y. Times Rev. 16:823, 
Dec. 10, '11. 

BIOGRAPHY FOR CHILDREN 
Bayard. Hare, Christopher, pseud. Story of Bayard, 
the good knight, without fear and without reproach. 

Button $2 

12-35555 Relates with much sympathy and charm the life and exploits 
of the Chevalier Bayard, known as " The perfect knight." Based 
on the chronicles of the Loyal Servitor and others. 8 colored 
plates and head and tail pieces illustrative of contemporary devices, 
trappings etc. contribute to author's success in producing a picture 
of the period (1474-1524). 
Spec. 107:833, Nov. 18, '11. 

Dickens. Moses, Belle. Charles Dickens and his girl 

heroines. Appleton $1.25* n 

11-25703 Successfully written biography for young people with the em- 
phasis on Dickens's youth and the children in his novels. Gives 
some alluring extracts, without betraying plots. 

c Edison. Meadowcroft, W. H. Boy's life of Edison. 

Harper $1.25 

11-29109 Well-written, interesting and stimulating account of Edison's 
life and inventions, written by a member of his staff and published 
with his approval. Emphasizes his intense and constant application 
as a secret of his success. Portraits and other halftone reproduc- 
tions. 

225.92 Paul, St. Grierson, Mrs E. W. Life of St Paul for 

young people. Macmillan $1.50 n 

12-35554 Simple, conservative narrative of the principal incidents in his 
career, related with a moderate and legitimate use of the imagina- 
tion against a carefully described background. Well printed, but 
rather luridly illustrated. 

Plutarch. Plutarch's lives for boys and girls; being 

selected lives freely retold by W. H. Weston ; illus. in 

color by W. Rainey. Stokes $2.50 n 

Wi2-22 Twelve lives of Greeks and Romans, selected for their exhibi- 

tion, by example or contrast, of patriotism, justice, courage, forti- 
tude and temperance. Attractive in binding, printing and colored 
illustration. 

CHILDREN'S STORIES 
a Brown, E. A. Four Gordons. Lothrop $1.50 

11-12124 Pleasant story of well-bred but human boys and girls, in its 
wholesomeness, character drawing and naturalness, recalling Miss 
Alcott's books. 



52 ' NEW YORK STATE LIBRARY 

c Dix, B. M. Friends in the end. Holt $1.25 n 

11-27803 Wholesome and interesting story of two girls of twelve and 
fourteen spending the summer on a White mountain farm. The 
situations are rather hackneyed but the treatment and atmosphere 
are fresh. 

Forrester, I. L. The Polly Page ranch club. (Polly 

Page ser.) Jacobs $1 n 

11-35888 Follows The Polly Page yacht club. Tells how Polly and her 
girl friends earned money for their vacation on a Wyoming ranch, 
how they learned to ride ranch ponies, went camping in the moun- 
tains, helped to locate a dinosaurus etc. The girls continue to be 
democratic, happy and full of energy. 

Hammond, Harold. West Point: its glamour and its 
grind. Cupples $1.25 

10-7825 Gives in almost negligible story form, a simple, straightforward 

account of the routine of cadet life at the United States Military 
Academy. Illustrations from photographs. 

Hughes, Thomas. Tom Brown's school days; with an 

introd. by W. D. Howells ; illus. by Louis Rhead. 

Harper $1.50 

11-27304 Attractive edition of this famous English story, uniform with 
the Rhead editions of Robinson Crusoe, and Swiss family Robin- 
son. Bound in red, well printed on good paper and illustrated in 
black and white from numerous drawings made at Rugby. 

Knipe, A. A. The last lap. Harper $1.25 

11-24115 Continues the school career of Bunny Reeves, hero of the 
Captain of the eleven. Track athletics and an exoerience at a 
Barnegat life-saving station sustain the interest, and Bunny's manly 
attitude toward teachers, betting and professionalism in athletics 
distinguish this among recent school stories. 

11-11447 Noteworthy for its emphasis on the importance of perseverance 
is J. P. Earl's School team on the diamond (Penn $1.25) a whole- 
some story of baseball, competition for an essay prize and a spring 
holiday at a sugar camp. 

11-23836 R. H. Barbour's For Yardley (Appleton $1.50) is a jolly story 
of school fun and athletics. Some high spirited boys publish a 
clever burlesque of the school paper and play a practical joke on a 
rival school for which one boy suffers fitting punishment. 

Marryat, Frederick. The children of the New Forest, 
with illustrations by E. B. Smith. Holt $1.35 n 

Aio-2445 New edition of this historical romance for young people, similar 
in its excellent form and illustration to the Holt edition of 
' Cooper's Last of the Mohicans. 8 colored plates illustrate exciting 
scenes and a black and white drawing heads each chapter. 

a Mason, A. B. Tom Strong, Washington's scout. 

Holt $1.25 n 

11-26252 Very readable, patriotic and informing story of the Revolution, 
relating the adventures of a boy and a trapper who serve as scouts. 
Washington, Hale, Andre, Arnold, Cornwallis and other historical 
characters are introduced naturally. Well-chosen illustrations, 
6 maps. 



• • 






BEST BOOKS OF I9II 53 

Rankin, Mrs C. W. The castaways of Pete's Patch. 
(Dandelion ser.) Holt $1.25 n 

11-28814 Relates pleasingly and with humor the experiences of an un- 
premeditated camping party on the shores of Lake Michigan in 
which the four girls of Dandelion Cottage and The adopting of 
Rosa Marie and several grown ups are the leading figures. The 
characterization is good and the story is marred only by the in- 
troduction of one cheap and rather melodramatic episode. 

Seton, E. T. Rolf in the woods; the adventures of a 

boy scout with Indian Quonab and little dog Skookum. 

Doubleday $1.50 n 

11-18473 Adventures of a fifteen year old orphan boy who lived for 
several years with an Indian in the North woods, joining with him 
in trapping, hunting, fishing, scouting, and fighting in the War of 
181 2. Dedicated to boy scouts and full of scout and wood lore. 
Full page and marginal drawings by author. 

Ath. 1911, 2:525; N. Y. Times Rev. i6:495» Aug. 13, 'n; Spec. 
107:937, Dec. 2, '11. 

c True, J. P. Scouting for Light Horse Harry. (Stuart 

Schuyler ser.) Little $1.50 

11-24117 Describes the adventures of Tom Ludlow, a New England 
youth, from his baptism of fire at Bunker Hill, through the North 
Carolina campaign as captain of " Schuyler's scouts." Written 
with vividness and spirit. 

b Wiggin, Mrs K. D. S. {Mrs George Riggs). Mother 

Carey's chickens. Houghton $1.25 n 

ii~23500 Attractive story of the widow and four children of a naval 
officer who come to live in a Maine village and spread happiness 
in spite of their poverty. Prettily illustrated. Appeared in Ladies' 
Home Journal. 

Bookman, 34:184; Lit. Digest, 43:497; Nation, 93:241. 



INDEX 



Abbott. America in the making, 8 
Abraham. The surgeon's log, 29 
Across South America. Bingham, 33 
Adventures of Bobby Orde. White, 

46 
Alarms and discursions. Chester- 
ton, note under Strunsky, 25 
Allen. Woman's part in government, 

13 
Almshouse, The. Johnson, 13 
America in the making. Abbott, 8 
America the beautiful. Bates, 26 
American Academy of Political and 

Social Science. Commission gov- 
ernment in American cities, note 

under Bradford, 12 
American civil engineers'' pocket 

book. Merriman, 6 
American history by American poets. 

Wallington, note under Schauffler, 

6 
Amurath to Amurath. Bell, note 

under Bury, 31 
Angell, Norman, pseud. The great 

illusion, 13 
Animal secrets told. Brearley, 48 
Aran Islands. Synge, 27 
Arkwright. Brownikins, 49 
Art in France. Hourticq, note under 

Caffin, 22 
Art of the pianist. Brower, 23 
Art of the Vienna galleries. Preyer, 

21 
As I remember. Gouverneur, 36 
Audel's answers on automobiles. 

Booth, 17 
Audoux. Marie-Claire, 40 
Autobiography of an elderly woman. 

Vorse, 8 

Ba:heller. Keeping up with Lizzie, 

40 
Baedeker. The Mediterranean, 7 
Baikie. Peeps at the heavens, 47 



Bailey. The country-life movement 

in the United States, 20 
Barbour. For Yardley, note under 

Knipe, 52 
Bardswell. Herb garden, note under 

Nuttall, 16 
Bartholomew. Literary and his- 
torical atlas of America, note under 

Shepherd, 7 
Bassett. Hall, 43 
Bates, E. C. Touring in 1600, 27 
Bates, K. L. America the beautiful, 

26 
Bayard, story of. Hare, 51 
Beard. Boat-building and boating, 

48 
Beith, Ian Hay, see Hay, Ian, pseud. 
Believing years. Pearson, 45 
Bell, Florence, lady. The singing 

circle, note under Arkwright, 49 
Bell, G. L. Amurath to Amurath, 

note under Bury, 31 
Belmont book. Farley, 28 
Benson, A. C. The leaves of the 

tree, 35 

Ruskin, 3S 

Benson, E. F. Margery, 40 
Benton, Caroline French, pseud, see 

Burrell 
Bergson. Creative evolution, 7 
Biblical geography and history. 

Kent, note under Huntington, 31 
Bingham. Across South America, 33 
Biology of the seasons. Thomson, 

15 
Birmingham, G. A. pseud. see 

Hannay 
Birukoff. Life of Tolstoy, note, 39 
Bloomfield. The vocational guidance 

of youth, 14 
Boat-building and boating. Beard, 

48 
Book of courage. Dawson, 8 

[55] ■ 



56 



NEW YORK STATE LIBRARY 



Books of entrees. Hill, note under 

Burrell, i8 
Booth. Audel's answers on automo- 
biles, 17 
Borup. A tenderfoot with Peary, 34 
Bosworth. The living wage of 
women workers, note under 
Streightoff, 11 
Boy Scouts of America. The official 

handbook for boys, 47 
Bradford. Commission government 

in American cities, 12 
Brearley. Animal secrets told, 48 
Briggs. Girls and education, 14 
Broad highway. Farnol, 42 
Broadway. Kerfoot, note under 

Jenkins, z^ 
Brower. The art of the pianist, 23 
Brown, E. A. Four Gordons, 51 
Brown, F. K. Through the mill, 10 
Brown, John. History of the Eng- 
lish Bible, note under Faris, 9 
Brownikins. Arkwright, 49 
Browning, Robert, early literary 

career. Lounsbury, 25 
Buchan. The great diamond pipe, 40 
Buckrose. Down our street, 41 
Bullock. Selected articles on child 

labor, note under Phelps, 6 
Bungalows. Saylor, 21 
Bunnell. Cost-keeping for manu- 
facturing plants, note under Tay- 
lor, 18 
Burnett. The secret garden, 41 
Burrell. Easy entertaining, 18 
Bury. The land of Uz, 31 
Butler. Retrospect of forty years, 

35 
Butterfield. The country church and 
the rural problem, 9 

Cabin, The. White, z^ 
Caffin. The story of French paint- 
ing, 22 
Cambridge medieval history, 34 
Cambridge modern history, 34 
Cameron. The pretender person, 41 
Camp. Football for the spectator, 

note under Davis, 25 
Cap'n Warren's wards. Lincoln, 44 



Carleton. One way out, note under 

Living without a boss, 10 • 
Carpenter. Some pages of my life, 

35 
Case of Richard Meynell. Ward, 46 
Castaways of Pete's Patch. Rankin, 

53 
Cat's cradles from many lands. Had- 

don, 24 
Cavour, life and times. Thayer, note 

under Trevelyan, 34 
Cawein. Poems, 26 
Changeful earth. Cole, 15 
Changing Chinese. Ross, 30 
Chapin, Konigskinder, 49 
Chase. Yosemite trails, note under 

Muir, ^2 
Chesterton. Alarms and discursions, 

note under Strunsky, 25 
The innocence of Father 

Brown, 41 
Child. The man in the shadow, 41 
Children of the New Forest. Mar- 

ryat, 52 
Children's book of Christmas. 

Dier, 47 
Children's Educational Theatre. 

Herts, 24 
Child's guide to the Bible. Hodges, 

note under Raymont, 9 
Childs. Short-ballot principles, 10 
China's story in myth, legend, art 

and annals. Griffis, note under 

Ross, 30 
Chirol. Indian unrest, note under 

Collier, 29 
Chittenden. War or peace, note 

under Angell, 13 
City govermient by commission. 

Woodruff, note under Bradford, 

12 
Clappe. The wind-band and its in- 
struments, 24 
Clark, E. H. Reminiscences of an 

athlete, 24 
Clark, Mrs S. A. & Wyatt. Making 

both ends meet, note under 

Streightoff, 11 
Clarke. The ideal of Jesus, 9 



INDEX TO BEST BOOKS OF I9II 



57 



Clemenceau. South America of to- 
day, note under Bingham, 33 

Clever Hans. Pfungst, 20 

Cole. The changeful earth, 15 

Collier. The West in the East from 
an American point of view, 29 

Collins. Second boys' book of model 
aeroplanes, 48 

Coming China. Goodrich, note un- 
der Ross, 30 

Coming of evolution. Judd, note un- 
der Bergson, 7 

Commission government in Ameri- 
can cities. Bradford, 12 

American Academy of Politi- 
cal and Social Science, note under 
Bradford, 12 

Comstock. Handbook of nature- 
study, 16 

Conservation by sanitation. Rich- 
ards, note under Ogden, 19 

Control of the market. Wyman, 12 

Cook. Life of John Ruskin, note, 38 

Corbin. Mechanical inventions of to- 
day, 17 

Corner of Harley Street, The, 41 

Cortissoz. John La Farge, 37 

Cost-keeping for manufacturing 
plants. Bunnell, note under Tay- 
lor, 18 

Coulevain, Pierre de, pseud. The 
unknown isle, 28 

Country church and the rural prob- 
lem. Butterfield, 9 

Country Life Commission. Report, 
note under Bailey, 20 

Country-life movement in the 
United States. Bailey. 20 

Coward of Thermopylae. Snedeker, 

45 
Craig. Secrets of the hills, 48 
Creative evolution. Bergson, 7 
Cyclopedia of education. Monroe, 6 

Dalrymple & MacDonald. Marta in 

Holland, note under Perkins, 50 
Dana. Two years before the mast, 

49 
Daniels. Home life in Norway, 29 

Davis. Football, 24 



Dawson. Book of courage, 8 
Deland. The iron woman, 41 
De Morgan. A likely story, 42 
Der Ling. Two years in the For- 
bidden City, note under Ross, 30 
Dickens, Charles, biography, 51 

Scenes from Dickens, 27 

Dickinson. The education of a 
music lover, note under Schauffler, 

23 
Dier. Children's book of Christmas, 

47 
Dix. Friends in the end, 52 
Dole. Life of Lyof N. Tolstoi, note, 

39 

Dominion of Canada. Griffith, note 
under Talbot, 32 

Doty. Prevention of infectious dis- 
eases, 20 

Down north on the Labrador. Gren- 
fell, 43 

Down our street. Buckrose, 41 

Downes. Life and works of Wins- 
low Homer, note under La Farge, 

37 

Dramatic values. Montague, 24 

Duncan, J. C. The principles of in- 
dustrial management, note under 
Taylor, 18 

Duncan, R. K. Some chemical prob- 
lems of to-day, 15 

Diirer. Albrecht Diirer; his engrav- 
ings and wood-cuts, 22 

Dutch twins. Perkins, 50 

EarL School team on the diamond, 

note under Knipe, 52 
Early literary career of Robert 

Browning. Lounsbury, 25 
Eastman. The soul of the Indian, 35 
Easy entertaining. Burrell, 18 
Economy of food. Murray, note un- 
der Olsen, 17 
Edison, boy's life of. Meadowcroft, 

51 

Education of a music lover. Dickin- 
son, note under Schauffler, 23 

Edwards. Panama, 33 

Egypt. Maspero, 27 



58 



NEW YORK STATE LiBRARV 



Ellis. The problem of race-regenera- 
tion, note under Kellicott, i6 

Ely. The practical flower garden, 23 

Essays on Russian novelists. Phelps, 
26 

Eucken. The truth of religion, note 
under Hodges, 9 

Everyman's religion. Hodges, 9 

Evolution. Geddes & Thomson, note 
under Bergson, 7 

Exercise and health. Hutchinson, 
note, 19 

Face of the fields. Sharp, 15 

Fairy tales. Grimm, 50 

Paris. Romance of the English Bible, 

9 
Farley. The Belmont book, 28 

Farm dairying. Rose, 20 

Farnol. The broad highway, 42 

The money moon, 42 

Ferrero. The women of the 

Caesars, 36 
Fireman, The. Jenks, 48 
Flandrau. Prejudices, 25 
Flitch. Mediterranean moods, note 

under Baedeker, 7 
Following the conquistadores, along 

the Andes and down the Amazon. 

Mozans, note under Bingham, 33 
Food values. Locke, note under 

Olsen,' 17 
Football. Davis, 24 
Football for the spectator. Camp, 

note under Davis, 25 
Footlights fore and aft. Pollock, 

note under Montague, 24 
For Yardley. Barbour, note under 

Knipe, 52 
Forester's manual. Seton, 16 
Forman. The ideal Italian tour, 28 
Forrester. The Polly Page ranch 

club, 52 
Four Gordons. Brown, 51 
Four months afoot in Spain. Franck, 

28 
France, Anatole, pseud. Honey-bee, 

50 
France in the American Revolution. 

Perkins, 35 



Franck. Four months afoot in 

Spain, 28 
French, Alice, see Thanet, Octave, 

pseud. 
Friends in the end. Dix, 52 
From school through college. 

Wright, 14 
Fuller. Later Pratt portraits, 42 
Further adventures of Nils. Lager- 

lof, 50 

Galsworthy. The patrician, 42 
Garibaldi and the making of Italy. 

Trevelyan, 34 
Garland of childhood. Withers, 27 
Garrison, William Lloyd, biography, 

36 
Geddes & Thomson. Evolution, note 

under Bergson, 7 
Gilbreth. Motion study, note under 

Ta3dor, 18 
Gillmore. Janey, 42 
Girl in the other seat. Webster, 46 
Girls and education. Briggs, 14 
Glasgow. The miller of Old Church, 

42 
Glory of Clementina. Locke, 44 
Golden spears. Leamy, 51 
Goodrich. The coming China, note 

under Ross, 30 
Gothic architecture in England and 

France. West, 21 
Gouverneur. As I remember, 36 
Great diamond pipe. Buchan, 40 
Great illusion. Angell, 13 
Greatest street in the world. Jenkins, 

32 
Gregory. The Kiltartan wonder- 
book, 14 
Grenfell. Down north on the 

Labrador, 43 
Grierson. Life of St Paul for young 

people, 51 
Griffis. China's story in myth, legend, 

art and annals, note under Ross, 30 
Griffith. The Dominion of Canada, 

note under Talbot, 32 
Grimm. Fairy tales, 50 
Grimshaw. When the red gods call, 

43 



INDEX TO BEST BOOKS OF IQII 



59 



Grinnell & Swan. Harper's camping 

and scouting, 49 
Gunn. We of the Never-never, 33 

Haddon. Cat's cradles from many 
lands, 24 

Haggard. Rural Denmark and its 
lessons, note under Bailey, 20 

Half a man. Ovington, 10 

Half hours with the summer stars. 
Proctor, 15 

Hall, A. N. Handicraft for handy 
boys, 48 

Hall, -E. V. Bassett, 43 

Hammond. West Point, 52 

Hancock. Nature sketches in tem- 
perate America, note under Thom- 
son, 15 

Hand in the game. Hunting, 44 

Handbook of health.. Hutchinson, 19 

Handbook of nature-study. Corn- 
stock, 16 

Handicraft for handy boys. Hall, 48 

Hannay. Spanish gold, 43 

Hare, Christopher, pseud. Story of 
Bayard, 51 

Harker. Master and maid, 43 

Harper's camping and scouting. 
Grinnell & Swan, 49 

Harris, Gideon, pseud, see Booth 

Harris, H. F. Health on the farm, 
note under Ogden, 19 

Harrison, Mrs C. C. Recollections 
grave and gay, note under Gouver- 
neur, 36 

Harrison, H. S. Queed, 43 

Hart. The obvious Orient, 30 

Harte, Bret, biography, 36 

Hawks. Stars shown to the children, 
note under Baikie, 48 

Hay, Ian, pseud. A safety match, 43 

Health on the farm. Harris, note 
under Ogden, 19 

Henderson, C. H. Pay-day, 10 

Henderson, H. W. The Pennsyl- 
vania Academy of the Fine Arts, 
21 

Herb garden. Bardswell, note un- 
der Nuttall, 16 

Herts. The Children's Educational 
Theatre, 24 



Hervey. Franz Liszt and his music, 

High deeds of Finn. Rolleston, 14 
High school debate book. Robbins, 

6 
Hill, F. T. On the trail of Grant 

and Lee, 35 
Hill, Mrs J. M. Book of entrees, 

note under Burrell, 18 
Hinkson. Princess Katharine, 44 
Historic inventions. Holland, 48 
Historical atlas. Shepherd, 7 
History of the English Bible. Brown, 

note under Faris, 9 
Hodges. Child's guide to the Bible, 

note under Raymont, 9 

Everyman's religion, 9 

Training of children in re- 
ligion, 8 

Holland. Historic inventions, 48 

Home life in Holland. Meldrum, 29 

Home life in Norway. Daniels, 29 

Home waterworks. Lynde, note un- 
der Ogden, 19 

Homer, Winslow, biography, note 
under La Farge, 37 

Honey-bee. France, 50 

Hopkins. Scientific American cyclo- 
pedia of formulas, 6 

Hourticq. Art in France, note un- 
der Caffin, 22 

House fly. Howard, 20 

Howard. House fly, 20 

Hueffer. Memories and impressions, 
36 

Hughes, Katherine. Father Lacombe, 

37 

Hughes, Thomas. Tom Brown's 
school days, 52 

Humbler poets. Rice, 26 

Hungerford. The modern railroad, 
18 

Hunting. A hand in the game, 44 

Huntington. Palestine and its trans- 
formation, 31 

Husband. A year in a coal-mine, 17 

Hutchinson. Handbook of health, 19 

Exercise and health, note, 19 

Hutton. Venice and Venetia, 28 
Huzard. Love vs. law, 44 



6o 



NEW YORK STATE LIBRARY 



Ideal Italian tour. Forman, 28 

Ideal of Jesus. Clarke, 9 

In the time of the Pharaohs. Moret, 
note under Maspero, 27 

Income tax. Seligman, 12 

Indian unrest. Chirol, note under 
Collier, 29 

Innocence of Father Brown. Ches- 
terton, 41 

Intellectual and political currents in 
the Far East. Reinsch, note under 
Hart, 30 

Iron woman. Deland, 41 

Janey. Gillmore, 42 

Jenkins. The greatest street in the 

world, 32 
Jenks. The fireman, 48 
Jewett. Letters, 36 
John Sherwood, ironmaster. Mitchell, 

45 
Johnson, Alexander. The almshouse, 

13 
Johnson, Constance. When mother 
lets us keep pets, note under Keyes, 

49 
Johnson, T. L. My story, Zl 
Johnston, J. H. Who-was-it ? stories, 

47 
Johnston, Mary. The long roll, 44 

Judd. Coming of evolution, note un- 
der Bergson, 7 

Kaempffert. The new art of fly- 
ing, 17 

Keeping up with Lizzie. Bacheller, 
40 

Kellicott. The social direction of 
human evolution, 16 

Kennedy Square. Smith, 45 

Kent. Biblical geography and his- 
tory, note under Huntington, 31 

Kerfoot. Broadway, note under 
Jenkins, 32 

Kester. The prodigal judge, 44 

Keyes. When mother lets us play, 

49 
Kiltartan wonderbook. Gregory, 14 
King. The moral and religious chal- 
lenge of our times, 10 
Knipe. The last lap, 52 



Koebel. Uruguay, note under Bing- 
ham, 33 

Konigskinder. Chapin, 49 

Krehbiel. Pianoforte and its music, 
note under Brower, 23 

Lacombe, Father, biography, yj 
La Farge, John, biography, 2>7 
Lagerlof. Further adventures of 

Nils, 50 
Land of Uz. Bury, 31 
Land we live in. Price, 47 
Lane, Mrs John. Talk of the town, 

25 
Lane, R. N. A. see Angell, Norman, 

pseud, 

Larned. A study of greatness in 
men, yj 

Last lap. Knipe, 52 

Later Pratt porfraits. Fuller, 42 

Leamy. The golden spears, 51 

Leaves of the tree. Benson, 35 

Lecoq de Boisbaudran. Training of 
the memory in art, 21 

Legacy, The. Watts, 46 

Lewis, G. G. Practical book of 
oriental rugs, 21- 

Lewis, Mrs H. C. see Cameron. 

Likely story. De Morgan, 42 

Lincoln. Cap*n Warren's wards, 44 

Liszt, Franz, biography, 23 

Literary and historical atlas of 
America. Bartholomew, note un- 
der Shepherd, 7 

Living wage of women workers. 
Bosworth, note under Streightoff, 
II 

Living without a' boss, 10 

Locke, E. A. Food values, note un- 
der Olsen, 17 

Locke, W. J. The glory of Clemen- 
tina, 44 

Log of the Easy Way. Mathews, 32 

Long roll. Johnston, 44 

Longford. The story of Korea, 34 

Lounsbury. Early literary career of 
Robert Browning, 25 

Love vs. law. Huzard, 44 

Lowell, Josephine Shaw, biography, 

Z7 
Lucas. Old lamps for new, 25 



INDEX TO BEST BOOKS OF IQI I 



6l 



Luther, Martin, biography, 38 
Lynde. Home waterworks, note un- 
der Ogden, 19 

McCoUom. Vines and how to grow 

them, 23 
MacDonald & Dalrymple. Marta in 

Holland, note under Perkins, 50 
McGiffert. Martin Luther, note, 38 
Macgregor. The story of France told 

to boys and girls, 50 
Making both ends meet. Clark & 

Wyatt, note under Streightoff, 11 
Making of a great Canadian railway. 

Talbot, note, 31 
Man in the shadow. Child, 41 
Mansur, Abdullah, pseud, see Bury 
Margery. Benson, 40 
Marie-Claire. Audoux, 40 
Marks, Mrs L. S. see Peabody 
Marryat. The children of the New 

Forest, 52 
Marta in Holland. MacDonald & 

Dalrymple, note under Perkins, 50 
Mason. Tom Strong, 52 
Maspero. Egypt, 27 
Master and maid. Harker, 43 
Mathews. The log of the Easy Way, 

32 

Matthews. A study of versification, 

25 
Meadowcroft. Boy's life of Edison, 

51 
Mechanical inventions of to-day. 

Corbin, 17 
Mediterranean, The. Baedeker, 7 
Mediterranean moods. Flitch, note 

under Baedeker, 7 
Meldrum. Home life in Holland, 2q 
Members of the family. Wister, 46 
Memorial day. Schauffler, 6 
Memories and impressions. Hueffer, 

36 
Merriman. American civil engineers' 

pocket book, 6 
Merwin. Life of Bret Harte, 36 
Miller of Old Church. Glasgow, 42 
Mills. The spell of the Rockies, 32 
Mitchell. John Sherwood, ironmas- 
ter, 45 



Modern railroad. Hungerford, 18 

Money moon. Farnol, 42 

Monroe. A cyclopedia of education, 

6 
Montague. Dramatic values, 24 
Moral and religious challenge of our 

times. King, 10 
Moret. In the time of the Pharaohs, 

note under Maspero, 27 
Moses. Charles Dickens and his girl 

heroines, 51 
Mother. Norris, 45 
Mother Carey's chickens. Wiggin, 

53 

Motion study. Gilbreth, note urdcr 

_ Taylor, 18 

Mozans. Following the conquista- 
dores, along the Andes and down 
the Amazon, note under Bingham, 

33 

Muir, John. My first summer in the 

Sierra, 32 

Muir, Ramsay. New school atlas of 
modern history, note under Shep- 
herd, 7 

Mum ford.' Oriental rugs, note under 
Lewis, 22 

Murray. Economy of food, note un- 
der Olsen, 17 

Musical amateur. Schauffler, 23 

My first summer in the Sierra. Muir, 
32 

My life story. Wazan, 39 

My story. Johnson, 37 

Myths and legends of the Celtic 
race. Rolleston, note, 14 

Nature sketches in temperate Amer- 
ica. Hancock, note under Thom- 
son, 15 
Neighbors unknown. Roberts, 16 
New art of flying. Kaempffert, 17 
New garden of Canada. Talbot, 31 
New school atlas of modern history. 

Muir, note under Shepherd, 7 
Norris. Mother, 45 
Novicow. War and its alleged bene- 
fits, note under Angell, 13 
Nuttall. Wild flowers as they grow, 
16 



62 



NEW YORK STATE LIBRARY 



Obvious Orient. Hart, 30 
Ogden. Rural hygiene, 19 
Olcott. Star lore of all ages, note 

under Proctor, 15 
Old lamps for new. Lucas, 25 
Olsen. Pure foods, 17 
On the iron at Big Cloud. Packard, 

45 
On the trail of Grant and Lee. Hill, 

3S 

One thousand homeless men. Solen- 
berger, 11 

One way out. Carleton, note under 
Living without a boss, 10 

Oriental rugs. Mumford, note un- 
der Lewis, 22 

Ovington. Half a man, 10 

Packard. On the iron at Big Cloud, 

45 
Palestine and its transformation. 

Huntington, 31 
Palmer. Problem of freedom, 8 
Panama. Edwards, 33 
Paper-bag cookery. Soyer, 17 
Paradise in Portugal. Sale, 29 
Past at our doors. Skeat, 14 
Patient observer and his friends. 

Strunsky, 25 
Patrician. Galsworthy, 42 
Paul, St, life of for young people. 

Grierson, 51 
Pay-day. Henderson, 10 
Peabody. The singing man, 26 
•Pearson. The beliering years, 45 
Peeps at the heavens. Baikie, 47 
Pennell. Things seen in northern 

India, note under Collier, 29 
Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine 

Arts. Henderson, 21 
People of Popham. Wemyss, note 

under Hall, 43 
Perkins, J. B. France in the Ameri- 
can Revolution, 35 
Perkins, L. F. The Dutch twins, 50 
Pfungst. Clever Hans, 20 
Phelps, E. M. Selected articles on 

the parcels post, 6 
Phelps, W. L. Essays on Russian 

novelists, 26 



Pianoforte and its music. Krehbiel, 

note under Brower, 23 
Plain-towns of Italy. Williams, note 

under Hutton, 28 
Plutarch's lives for boys and girls, 

51 

Pollard. Records of the English 
Bible, note under Faris, 9 

Pollock. Footlights fore and aft, 
note under Montague, 24 

Polly Page ranch club. Forrester, 
52 

Porter. Poems of action, 26 

Poumies de la Siboutie. Recollec- 
tions of a Parisian, 38 

Practical book of oriental rugs. 
Lewis, 21 

Practical flower garden. Ely, 23 

Prejudices. Flandrau, 25 

Pretender person. Cameron, 41 

"Prevention of infectious diseases. 
Doty, 20 

Preyer. The art of the Vienna gal- 
leries, 21 

Price, O. W. The land we live in, 

47 
Priddy, AI, pseud, see Brown, F. K. 

Princess Katharine. Hinkson, 44 

Principles of industrial management. 
Duncan, note under Taylor, 18 

Principles of scientific management. 
Taylor, 18 

Problem of freedom. Palmer, 8 

Problem of race-regeneration. El- 
lis, note under Kellicott, 16 

Proctor. Half hours with the sum- 
mer stars, 15 

Prodigal judge. Kester, 44 

Pure foods. Olsen, 17 

Putnam. William the Silent, prince 
of Orange, 40 

Queed. Harrison, 43 

Ragg. Things seen in Venice, note 

under Hutton, 28 
Rankin. The castaways of Pete's 

Patch, 53 
Raymont. Use of the Bible in the 

education of the young, 8 



INDEX TO BEST BOOKS OF tgit 



63 



Recollections grave and gay. Har- 
rison, note under Gouverneur, 36 

Recollections of a Parisian. Ppumies 
de la Siboutie, 38 

Records of the English Bible. Pol- 
lard, note under Paris, 9 

Reinsch. Intellectual and political 
currents in the Far East, note un- 
der Hart, 30 

Reminiscences of an athlete. Clark, 

24 
Rendall. Sinai in spring, note under 

Bury, 31 

Rice; The humbler poets, 26 

Richards. Conservation by sanita- 
tion, note under Ogden, 19 

Riverside readers, 47 

Robbins. High school debate book, 6 

Selected articles on the open 

versus closed shop, note under 
Phelps, 6 

Roberts. Neighbors unknown, 16 
Robinson. The width and arrange- 
ment of streets, 22 
Rolf in the woods. Seton, 53 
Rolland. Tolstoy, 39 
Rolleston. The high deeds of Finn, 

14 

Myths and legends of the 

Celtic race, note, 14 
Romance of the English Bible. Paris, 

9 
Rose. Farm dairying, 20 

Ross. The changing Chinese, 30 
Rural church and community better- 
ments. Y. M. C. A. International 
Committee, note under Butterfield, 

ID 

Rural Denmark and its lessons. Hag- 
gard, note under Bailey, 20 
Rural hygiene. Ogden, 19 
Ruskin, John, biography, 38 

Safety match. Hay, 43 

St John. Things a boy should know 

about wireless, 18 
Sale, Mark, pseud. A paradise in 

Portugal, 29 
Saylor. Bungalows, 21 
Scenes from Dickens, 27 



Schauffler. Memorial day, 6 

The musical amateur, 23 

School team on the diamond. Earl, 

note under Knipe, 52 

Schreiner. Woman and labour, 13 

Scientific American cyclopedia of 
formulas. Hopkins, 6 

Scouting for Light Horse Harry. 
True, 53 

Second boys' book of model aero- 
planes. Collins, 48 

Secret garden. Burnett, 41 

Secrets of the hills. Craig, 48 

Sedgwick. Tante, 45 

Selected articles on child labor. Bul- 
lock, note under Phelps, 6 

Selected articles on the open versus 
closed shop. Robbins, note under 
Phelps, 6 

Selected articles on the parcels post. 
Phelps, 6 

Seligman. The income tax, 12 

Seton. The forester's manual, 16 

Rolf in the woods, 53 

Shade-trees in towns and cities. 

Solotaroff, note under Robinson, 
22 

Sharp. The face of the fields, 15 
Shepherd. Historical atlas, 7 
Shop management. Taylor, note, 18 
Short-ballot principles. Childs, 10 
Shorter course in woodworking. 
Wheeler, 19 

Sinai in spring. Rendall, note under 
Bury, 31 

Singing circle. Bell, note under Ark- 
wright, 49 • 

Singing man. Peabody, 26 

Skeat. The past at our doors, 14 

Skelton. Socialism, ii 

Smith, F. H. Kennedy Square, 45 

Smith, Preserved. Life and letters of 
Martin Luther, 38 

Snedeker. The coward of Ther- 
mopylae, 45 

Social direction of human evolution. 
Kellicott, 16 

Socialism. Skelton, 11 

Solenberger. One thousand homeless 
men, 11 



64 



NEW YORK STATE LIBRARY 



Solotaroff. Shade-trees in towns and 

cities, note under Robinson, 22 
Some chemical problems of to-day. 

Duncan, 15 
Soul of the Indian. Eastman, 35 
South America of to-day. Clemen- 

ceau, note under Bingham, 33 
Soyer's paper-bag cookery, 17 
Spanish gold. Hannay, 43 
Spell of the Rockies. Mills, 32 
Standard of living among the in- 
dustrial people of America. 
Streightoff, 11 
Star lore of all ages. Olcott, note 

under Proctor, 15 
Stars shown to the children. Hawks, 

note under Baikie, 48 
Stewart. Philanthropic work of 

Josephine Shaw Lowell, 37 
Stories that end well. Thanet, 46 
Story of Bayard. Hare, 51 
Story of France told to- boys and 

girls. Macgregor, 50 
Story of French painting. Caffin, 22 
Story of Korea. Longford, 34 
Stowe, Harriet Beecher, biography, 

38 
Streightoff. Standard of living 

among the industrial people of 

America, 11 
Strunsky. The patient observer and 

his friends, 25 
Study of greatness in men. Larned, 

Study of versification. Matthews, 25 
Surgeon's log. Abraham, 29 
Swift. William Lloyd Garrison, z^ 
Synge. The Aran Islands, 27 

Talbot. The making of a great 

Canadian railway, note, 31 
The new garden of Canada. 

31 
Talk of the town. Lane, 25 
Tallentyre, S. G. pseud, see Hall, 

E. V. 
Tante. Sedgwick, 45 
Tappan. When knights were bold, 

50 
Tarbell. The tariff in our times, 12 
Tariff in our times. Tarbell, 12 



Taylor. The principles of scientific 
management, 18 

Shop management, note, 18 

Tenderfoot with Peary. Borup, 34 
Thanet, Octave, pseud. Stories that 

end well, 46 
Thayer. Life and times of Cavour, 

note under Trevelyan, 34 
Thibault, J. A. see France, Anatole, 

pseud. 
Things a boy should know about 

wireless. St John, 18 
Things seen in northern India. Pen- 

nell, note under Collier, 29 
Things seen in Venice. Ragg, note 

under Hutton, 28 
Thomas, Theodore, biography, 38 
Thomson. The biology of the sea- 
sons, 15 

& Geddes. Evolution, note 

under Bergson, 7 

Through the mill. Brown, 10 

Tolstoi, biography, 39 

Tom Brown's school days. Hughes, 

52 

Tom Strong. Mason, 52 

Touring in 1600. Bates, 27 

Town planting. Webster, note un- 
der Robinson, 22 

Training of children in religion. 
Hodges, 8 

Training of the memory in art. Lecoq 
de Boisbaudran, 21 

Trevelyan. Garibaldi and the mak- 
ing of Italy, 34 

True. Scouting for Light Horse 
Harry, 53 

Truth of religion. Eucken, note un- 
der Hodges, 9 

Two years before the mast. Dana, 

49 
Two years in the Forbidden City. 
Der Ling, note under Ross, 30 

United States navy. Williams, 12 
Unknown isle. Coulevain, 28 
Uruguay. Koebel, note under Bing- 
ham, 33 
Use of the Bible in the education of 
the young. Raymont, 8 



INDEX TO BEST BOOKS OF IQII 



65 



Vados, pseud, see Farley 

Van Dyke. Poems, 26 

Van Sickle, Seegmiller & Jenkins. 

Riverside readers, 47 
Venice and Venetia. Hutton, 28 
Very little person. Vorse, 46 
Vines and how to grow them. Mc- 

Collom, 23 
Vocational guidance of youth. 

Bloomfield, 14 
Vorse. Autobiography of an elderly 

woman, 8 
The very little person, 46 

Wagner, Richard. Family letters, 39 

My life, note, 39 

Wallington. American history by 
American poets, note under 
Schauffler, 6 

War and its alleged benefits. Novi- 
cow, note under Angell, 13 

War or peace. Chittenden, note un- 
der Angell, 13 

Ward. The case of Richard Mey- 
nell, 46 

Watts. The legacy, 46 

Wazan. My life story, 39 

We of the Never-never. Gunn, 33 

Webster, A. D. Town planting, note 
under Robinson, 22 

Webster, H. K. The girl in the 
other seat, 46 

Welles, Gideon. Diary, 40 

Wemyss. People of Popham, note 
under Hall, 43 

West. Gothic architecture in Eng- 
land and France, 21 

West in the East from an American 
point of view. Collier, 29 

West Point. Hammond, 52 

Wheeler. Shorter course in wood- 
working, 19 

When knights were bold. Tappan, 
50 

When mother lets us keep pets. 
Johnson, note under Keyes, 49 

When mother lets us play. Keyes, 

49 



When the red gods call. Grimshaw, 

43 
White, S. E. The adventures of 

Bobby Orde, 46 

The cabin, 33 

White, Mrs T. C. see Der Ling 
Who-was-it? stories. Johnston, 47 
Width and arrangement of streets. 

Robinson, 22 
Wiggin. Mother Carey's chickens, 

53 

Wild flowers as they grow. Nuttall, 
16 

William I, prince of Orange, biog- 
raphy, 40 

Williams, E. R. jr. Plain-towns of 
Italy, note under Hutton, 28 

Williams, Henry. The United States 
navy, 12 

Wind-band and its instruments 
Clappe, 24 

Winning of Barbara Worth. Wright, 

47 
Wister. Members of the family, 46 
Withers. The garland of childhood, 

27 
Woman and labour. Schreiner, 13 

Woman's part in government. Allen, 

13 
Women of the Caesars. Ferrero, 36 

Woodruff. City government by com- 
mission, note under Bradford, 12 

Wright, H. B. The winning of 
Barbara Worth, 47 

Wright, H. P. From school through 
college, 14 

Wyatt & Clark. Making both ends 
meet, note under Streightoff, 11 

Wyrtan. Control of the market, 12 

Y. M. C. A. International Commit- 
tee. The rural church and com- 
munity betterment, note under But- 
terfield, 10 

Year in a coal-mine. Husband, 17 

Yosemite trails. Chase, note under 
Muir, 32 

Yver, Colette, pseud, see Huzard 



Education Department Bulletin 

Published fortnigrhtly by the University of the State of New York 

Bntered as tecond-cla«i matter June a4. 1908. at the Post OfiSce at Albany, N. Y^ under 

the act of July x6, 1894 



No. 507 



ALBANY, N. Y. 



November 15, 191 1 



New York State Library 



Library School 30 



25th ANNUAL REPORT 



OF 



NEW YORK STATE LIBRARY SCHOOL 



1911 



PAGE 

Calendar 1910-11 4 

Work of the year 5 

Faculty 7 

Lecturers 1910-1 1 8 

Attendance 9 

List of students 1910-1 1 10 

Staff instruction 11 

Changes in courses of study. . . 12 

Annual library visit 15 

Original bibliographies 17 

Degrees 17 

Summer session 17 



PAGE 

Alumni 18 

Positions filled in 1910-1 1 19 

New York State Library School 

Association 22 

Necrology 23 

Notes and comments 23 

Library meetings 23 

Quarters for 191 1- 12 23 

Future of the school 24 

Publications 20 / 

Index 29 ' 



igio 



UctoDer 

it 


3-4 

5 

12 


November 


8 


ti 


23-28 


December 


22 


igii 




January 

February 
<< 


3 

13 
22 


April 


4-17 


May 


30 


June 


23 



CALENDAR 1910-11 

Entrance examinations 
School opened Wednesday a. m. 
Columbus day, holiday, Wednesday 
Election day, holiday, Tuesday 
Thanksgiving recess, Wednesday noon to 

Monday p. m. 
Christmas recess began Thursday p. m. 

Christmas recess ended Tuesday p. m. 
Lincoln's birthday, holiday, Monday 
Washington's birthday, holiday, Wednesday 
Visit to New York, Philadelphia and 

Washington libraries 
Decoration day, holiday, Tuesday 
School closed, Friday a. m. 



New York State Library 

Albany, November 8, igii 



Hon, A. S. Draper 

Commissioner oj Education 



Dear sir: I have the honor to present herewith, and to recom- 
mend for publication, the twenty-fifth annual report of the New 
York State Library School for the year ending September 30, 191 1. 

Very truly yours 

J. I. Wyer, Jr 

Director 



STATE OF NEW YORK 
EDUCATION DEPARTMENT 

commissioner's room 



Approved for publication this loth day of November igii 




Commissioner of Education 



- 1 



O NEW YORK STATE LIBRARY 

Of particular value in preventing undue discoiiragement on the 
part of either students or faculty were the offers of assistance and 
temporary quarters for the school which came at once by telegraph 
and letter. Biiffalo, Colimibia University and the New York 
Public Library offered aid and definite offers of quarters caipe from 
the Brooklyn Public Library, which offered the independent use of 
its resources for the calendar years 1911-12 if needed, the Glovers- 
ville (N. Y.) Public Library, Syracuse University, and the Utica 
Public Library. 

The prompt action of the libraries of Albany, including the Young 
Men's Association Library, the Pruyn Library, the Albany High 
School Library, the State Normal College Library and the Library 
of the Catholic Union, provided at once the books for technical 
practice required to finish the year. Later investigation of probable 
resources and quarters for 1911-12 and the hearty cooperation of 
Commissioner Draper made it advisable to remain in Albany and 
await the completion of the quarters in the new Education Building. 

In the two or three days immediately succeeding the fire the 
ingenuity and adaptability of every member of the faculty was 
called into service as practically nothing was left with which to 
conduct the various courses along former lines. Not only were the 
official school collections destroyed but the greater part of the 
personal professional collections of faculty and students shared a 
like fate. A few notebooks and manuals which had been taken home 
over night by unusually industrious students were all that was 
available, though a very generous immediate donation of library 
periodicals and other material from Miss Florence Woodworth 
permitted even some of the required professional reading to be re- 
sumed at once. 

This lack of equipment was speedily supplied, at least in part. 
Fortimately the courses requiring the most books, such as classifica- 
tion, cataloging, reference, and bibliography, were either wholly or 
largely completed before the fire so that the year could be creditably 
finished with a much smaller supply of books than would have been 
required at any earlier date and it was possible to buy at once books 
needed in several of • the courses then in progress. Inestimable 
service was rendered by a number of former students in forwarding 
at once their personal collections of professional material either as 
donations or loans. Among the earliest and largest contributions of 
the kind made directly to the school were those of Miss Elizabeth 
L. Foote, Mr Everett R. Perry, Miss Helen G. Sheldon, Miss Faith 
E. Smith, Miss Helen M. Thompson and Mr Joseph L. Wheeler. 
In addition to liberal donations of library publications, Mr 



REPORT OF LIBRARY SCHOOL I9II 7 

Joseph L. Harrison immediately sold to the State Library on very 
generous terms complete files of the Library Journal^ Public Libraries, 
and the Library including many of the scarce volumes which could 
otherwise have been obtained only after considerable delay and 
inconvenience. Miss Corinne Bacon, Miss Fanny Hart, Mr Herbert 
Hirschberg and Miss Josephine West lent their collections indefi- 
nitely. As these contained the problems, outlines, and other material 
relating to the curriculum of the last few years of the school, they 
were of the greatest value in permitting the practical reproduction 
of nearly the entire course in outline. Very valuable help was also 
given by the Wisconsin Library School which, in addition to return- 
ing duplicate copies of material sent to it by the New York State 
Library School, lent the syllabuses and outlines of its own work. 

Through the kindness of Dr Herbert Putnam, Librarian of Con- 
gress, and his staff, the seniors completed their courses in subject 
bibliography and history of libraries and printing in the Library of 
Congress under the direction of Mr Biscoe. 

A considerable number of other gifts have been made to the State 
Library by former students. These have all become available for 
school use. 

While the disaster was temporarily staggering, the genuine sym- 
pathy and confidence in the lasting qualities of the school which 
were so generally shown have been very great aids in permitting 
the work to be reestablished at once on a good basis. 

Mention must be made of the loyalty, adaptability and optimism 
shown by the student body. They met the changed conditions with 
cheerfulness, adapted themselves to them with intelligence and by 
their excellent spirit made it possible for the instructors to accom- 
plish satisfactory results. 

Even with all these mitigating circumstances, recovery from the 
effects of the fire would have been much slower and far less satisfac- 
tory without the personal interest shown by the Commissioner of 
Education and his active aid in the solution of many of the problems 
which arose from time to time. 

More detailed mention of the work of the year follows. 

FACULTY 

James IngersoU Wyer, Jr, M.L.S. (N.Y.) Director. Instructor in 
public documents, advanced reference work; lecturer on American 
libraries, 1906- 

Frank Keller Walter M.A. (Haverford) B.L.S. (N.Y.) Vice Director. 
Instructor in elementary reference work, bookbinding, printing, 
expansive classification, seminar, elementary bibliography, 1908- 



8 



NEW YORK STATE LIBRARY 



Florence Woodworth B.L.S. (N.Y.) Director's assistant. In charge 

of Library School collections and practice work, 1889- 
Walter Stanley Biscoe M.A. (Amherst) Instructor in bibliography, 

advanced classification, history of libraries and printing, 1887- 
Ada Alice Jones (Wellesley) Secretary of the faculty. Instructor in 

advanced cataloging, i888~ 
William Reed Eastman M.A. (Yale) M.L.S. (N.Y.) Instructor in 

library administration, library buildings, 1895- 
Martha Thome Wheeler, Instructor in selection of books, indexing, 

1895- 
Edna M. Sanderson B.A. (Wellesley) B.L.S. (N.Y.) Registrar, 1903- 

Katharine Dame B.A. (Boston Univ.) Graduate Pratt Institute 
Library School. Instructor in elementary cataloging, shelf and 
accession work, 1910- 

Jean Hawkins B.M. (Smith) B. L. S. (N.Y.) Instructor in classifi- 
cation 19 10- 
The brief courses in loan and order work were conducted by Mr 

Carl P. P. Vitz, Director's assistant and head of the order section 

of tfie State Library. 

LECTURERS 1910-11 

Aside from the faculty, the following 29 persons gave 67 lectures 
before the school. Most of the lectures formed integral parts of 
the regular courses: 



LECTURER 

Abraixis, A. W 

Anderson, B. H 

Askew, Sarah B 

Bacon, Corinne 

Bailey, A. L 

Betteridge, Grace L. . . 

Bunnell, Ada 

Chamberlain, Mary C. 

Champlin, G.' G 

Colson, F. D 

Crissey, Jane H 

Davis, Mary L 

Hall, Mary E 

Hunt, Clara W... 



POSITION 




Chief, Division of Visual 

Instruction, N. Y. State 

Education Department 
Assistant director. New 

York Public Library 
Assistant librarian. New 

Jersey State Library 
Chief, Catalog department, 

Newark (N. J.) Free 

Public Library 
Librarian, Wilmington In- 
stitute Free Library 
In charge traveling libraries 

and study clubs, N. Y. 

State Library 
Sublibrarian (medicine) N. 

Y. State Library 
Librarian for the blind, N.Y. 

State Library 
Sublibrarian (reference) N.Y. 

State Library 
Law librarian, N. Y. State 

Library 

Assistant, Troy (N. Y.) 

Public Library 
Librarian, Troy (N. Y.) 

Public Library 
Librarian, Girls High School 

Library, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Sup't, Children's dep't. 

Brooklyn Public Library 



2 
2 

z 

z 
z 

z 

z 

z 

z 

z 
z 

2 

z 
4 

2 



SUBJECT 



Visual instruction 



Administration of the New York 

Public Library 
Work of the New Jersey library 

comimission 
Qualifications of loan department 

assistants 

Bookbinding for public libraries 

New York State traveling libraries 
and study clubs 

Medical books and libraries 

Library work for the blind 

Patents 

Arrangement and use of law li- 
braries 
Law books for a popular library 
Book repairing 

Library administration 

Purpose and scope of high schoo 

lioraries 
Principles of book selection for 

children 
Essentials of administration in 

children's rooms 



REPORT OF LIBRARY SCHOOL I9II 



LECTURERS 1910-11 (concluded) 



LECTURER 


POSITION 


NO. 
LEC. 


SUBJECT 


Jones, Mary L 

Keogh, Andrew 

Legler, H. E 


Librarian, Bryn Mawr 
College Library 

Instructor, New York Uni- 
versity 

Reference librarian, Yale 
University 

Librarian, Chicago Public 
Library 

Legislative reference li- 
brarian, N. Y. State Li- 
brary 

Advisory children's librarian, 
Iowa Library Comnussion 

Sublibrarian (law), N. Y. 

State Library 
Assistant archivist, N. Y* 

State Library 
Librarian, Carnegie West 

Branch Cleveland Public 

Library 
Librarian, Trenton (N. J.) 

Free Public Library 
Secretary, Iowa Library 

Commission 
Assistant, reference section, 

N. Y. State Library 
Director's assistant, N. Y. 

State Library 

Librarian, Springfield (Mass.) 
City Library Associ;i- 
tion 

Institute conductor, N. Y. 
State Education Dep't 


2 

Z 

Z 

2 

I 
I 

3 

z 
4 

z 
I 

z 

2 
2 

8 

zo 

2 

z 


Administration of a college library 
Colonial libraries 
Cataloging as a vocation 
Administration of a large city li- 


Les' , C JL 


brary system 
Library ethics 
Lecislative reference work 


T^ynifttj Edna , 


Practical administration of chil- 


Lyon, Frances D. . . . . . 

Nelson, Peter 


dren's work in the smaller li- 
braries 

Story-telling 

Parliamentary law 

Manuscripts 


Smith, Bessie S 

Stronm. A* T 


Branch libraries 

Administration of the Trenton Free 


Tyler, Alice S 


Public Library 
Work of the Iowa Library Com- 


Van Peyma.Charlotte J. 

VltZ, v/a Jr • It. •••••••.. 

Wellman, H. C 

Williams, Sherman. . . . 


mission 
Local history and genealogy 

Order work 

Loan work 
Library advertising 

Schoolroom libraries 



ATTENDANCE 

The school year opened Wednesday, October 5, 1910 with a total 
registration of 41 students: 9 seniors, 31 juniors and i special student. 
New York had 12 representatives; Norway followed with 3; Iowa, 
Kentucky, Massachusetts, Minnesota, Ohio, Pennsylvania and Ver- 
mont sent 2 each, and 12 other states sent one each. The geographi- 
cal distribution of the students was wider than usual, coming as 
they did from 20 states and from Norway. Two states, Kentucky 
and Louisiana, were first represented on the student list this year, 
thus increasing to 34 the number of states from which we have had 
students. Norway has now sent a total of 7 students to the school. 

There was also wide distribution as regards the colleges from which 
the students came, a total of 28 being represented on the list of those 
granting a bachelor's degree. The largest number coming from any 
one college was 4 from Smith, which was followed by 3 each from the 
University of Christiania, Vassar and Wellesley, and 2 each from 
Chicago and Mount Holyoke. Four seniors, 1 1 juniors and i special 
student had been engaged in library work before entering the school, 



lO NEW YORK STATE LIBRARY 

3 had taken short library courses elsewhere, and i was admitted to 
the senior course because of his graduation from another library 
school and extended library experience subsequent to that graduation. 
Four were on leaves of absence and at the end of the school year 
returned to their former positions. 

LIST OF STUDENTS 
Seniors. Class of 191 1 

Adams, Leta Emma, Lincoln, Neb. B.A. (Nebraska University) 

1906 
Allen, Mrs Philip Loring, Troy, N.Y. B.L. (Wisconsin University) 

1899 
Brown, Helen Dal ton, Chicago, 111. B.A. (Bryn Mawr College) 

1909 
Carter, Sylvester J , Council Bluffs, la. B.A. (Drake University) 

1899 
Cunningham, Jesse, Lincoln, Neb. B.A. (Nebraska University) 

1906 
Eliot, Ruth Forbes, New Haven, Conn. B.A. (Smith College) 1908 
Fordice, Frances, Eldorado, Wis. B.A. (Ripon College) 1908 
Janvrin, Charles Edwin. Hampton Falls, N.H. Ph.B. (Chicago 

University) 19 10 

Suter, Martha Winkley, Roxbury, N.Y. B.A. (Radcliffe College) 

1901 

Juniors. Class of 1912 

Allen, Amy, Troy, 0. B.A. (Mt Holyoke College) 1907 

Bailey, Louise Morse, Gardner, Mass. B.A. (Smith College) 19 10 

Benedict, Georgia, Saratoga Springs, N.Y. B.A. (Wells College) 

1899; Ph.D. (Cornell University) 1903 
Carnegie, Elza Kier, Pittsburgh, Pa. B.A. (Vassar College) 1910 
Carpenter, Helen Sutton, Mount Kisco, N.Y. B.A. (Vassar College) 

1910 
Dougan, Alice Maria, Middle Granville, N.Y. Ph.B. (Chicago 

University) 1 906 
Enright, Daisy Maude, Burlington, Vt. Ph.B. (Vermont University) 

1905 
Gamble, William Burt, Orchard Lake, Mich. B.S. (Massachusetts 

Institute of Technology) 1893 
Hamilton, William James, Minneapolis, Minn. B.A. (Minnesota 

University) 19 10 
Holmes, Florence Isabel, Albany, N.Y. B.A. (Smith College) 1910 
Holth, Gudrun, Christ? ania, Norway. B.A. (University of Chris- 

tiania) 1904, Ph.B. 1906 



REPORT OF LIBRARY SCHOOL IQII II 

Johnsen, Marie Elizabeth, Drammen, Norway. B.A. (University of 
Christiania) 1899 

Jones, Mildred Katherine, Utica, N.Y. B.A. (Smith College) 19 10 

Keator, Alfred Decker, Accord, N.Y. B.A. (Amherst College) 1910 

Kelly, Frances Hamerton, Pittsburgh, Pa. B.A. (Wellesley College) 
1910 

Krausnick, Gertrude, St Louis, Mo. B.A. (Washington University) 
1910 

Leonard, Miriam Louise, Minneapolis, Minn. B.A. (Wellesley 
College) 19 10 

Lewis, Margaret MacDougall, Cohoes, N.Y. B.A. (Mt Holyoke 
College) 1 9 TO 

McCauley, Pauline, Morganfield, Ky. B.A. (Indiana University) 
1910 

Matthews, Gertrude, Waco, Texas. Ph.B. (Baylor University) 1993 

Miller, Emily van Dorn, New Orleans, La. B.A. (H. Sophie New- 
comb Memorial College) 1907 

Miller, Iowa Frances, Lancaster, 0. Ph.B. (Otterbein University) 
1898, M.A. 1905 

Potter, Mrs Elizabeth Florence (Gray), Oakland, Cal, Ph.B. 
(University of California) 1896 

Rawson, Fannie Castleman, Louisville, Ky. (Special) 

Rice, Paul North, Newton, Mass. B.A. (Wesleyan University) 1910 

Richardson, Mary Cleaves, Castine, Me. B.A. (Wellesley College) 
1905 

Smith, Jessamine McCliirkin, West Rutland, Vt. B.A. (Middlebury 
College) 1908 

Smith, Victor Alf Guerdrum, Christiania, Norway. M.A. (Univer- 
sity of Christiania) 1909 

Tinkham, Mabel, Fort Wayne, Ind. B.A. (Ohio Wesleyan Univer- 
sity) 1900 

Tompkins, Helen Wheeler, Poughkeepsie, N.Y. B.A. (Vassar 
College) 19 10 

Wansboro, Helen Rose, Albany, N.Y. B.A. (Cornell University) 
1910 

Watts, Blanche Viola, Sioux City, la. B.A. (Morningside College) 
1908 

Staff instruction. Four members of the staff of the New York 
State Library attended courses in the school. The subjects thus 
taken were bibliography, bookbinding, indexing and printing. Two 
others who had registered were prevented by the fire from attending 
the courses they had selected. 



12 NEW YORK STATE LIBRARY 

CHANGES IN COURSE OF STUDY 

Administration. There was no important change in the general 
plan of the course. Following the practice of several years past, 
the lecturers were selected so as to cover the same general subjects 
but at the same time to avoid duplication of the lectures of the 
previous year. Mr Wyer covered most of the subjects in the 
elementary course which were treated in 1908-10 by Miss Zaidee M. 
Brown. Three seminar class periods were devoted to discussion 
and practice of business correspondence and four periods to lectures 
by Miss Frances Lyon on elementary parliamentary law, followed 
by a mock trustees meeting. Miss Mary L. Davis of the Troy 
(N.Y.) Public Library gave three lectures on essential library sup- 
plies and library housekeeping. Several lectures had to be omitted 
for the present on account of the radical changes in the schedule 
occasioned by the fire. 

The general outline of the lectures in the advanced course follows. 
(For specific subjects of visiting lecturers, see pages 8-9.) 

General administration 
Mr William R. Eastman (4 lectures) 
Mr James I. Wyer, Jr (i lecture) 
Mr Hiller C. Wellman (2 lectures) 

Colleges and university libraries 
Mr Andrew Keogh (i lecture) 
Miss Mary L. Jones (2 lectures) 
Mr James L Wyer, Jr (3 lectures) 

Public libraries 
Mr Edwin H. Anderson (2 lectures) 
Mr Henry E. Legler (2 lectures) 
Miss Bessie S. Smith (i lecture) 
Mr Adam J. Strohm (i lecture) 

Bookbinding. Though the course began two days after the fire 
with absolutely nothing in the way of equipment, it was possible, 
through the prompt cooperation of the State Library in purchasing 
manuals and books to illustrate styles of binding and through the 
generosity of several leading bookbinders, to reassemble a working 
collection somewhat superior to that which was used before the fire. 
The usual practice in simple sewing and forwarding was given and 
a period of practice in simple mending and repairing was given at 
the Troy Public Library by Miss Jane H. Crissey. Mr A. L. Bailey, 
chairman of the A.L.A. committee on binding, again lectured on 
approved bindings for public library books. 



I 



REPORT OF LIBRARY SCHOOL I9II 1 3 

Cataloging and classification. The cotirse in cataloging was 
separated from that in classification with which it had been joined 
the previous year. Some minor changes in content and method 
were made. Increased emphasis was laid on the ordering and use 
of Library of Congress catalog cards in public libraries. 

The course in classification was conducted by Miss Hawkins. 

Order and accession work. This was conducted jointly by Miss 
Dame, who gave the lectures and problems on accession work, and 
by Mr Vitz, who gave those on order work. The lecttires on order 
work were entirely reconstructed though agreeing in general outline 
with the instruction given in former years. 

Printing. This course, like that on binding, was begim just after 
the fire without a particle of illustrative material or a scrap of lecture 
notes. The usual visit to the plant of the J. B. Lyon Co. and the 
intervention of the library visit permitted the acquisition of an 
adequate collection of reference and illustrative material. 

Law and legislative reference work. This course is postponed 
until 19 1 2-13 on account of the fire. By that time the equipment 
of these two sections will be well under way and the opportunities 
for practice will be numerous. A good law library is essential for 
the use of the courts and the qualified student will find plenty of 
chances for constructive work of value to the bar and the courts. 
The hbrary has already acquired an excellent set of New York State 
documents and currently receives those of all the other states, while 
its new set of Government documents received through the kindness 
of the Superintendent of Documents ranks among the best in the 
coimtry. 

Library and the ^community. This course which was suggested 
by the advisory committee of the altimni is annotmced as a senior 
elective in 191 1-12. Its purpose is described in the following extract 
from the circular: 

A credit of 200-300 hours will be given to any student making an 
approved study of the hbrary work and possibilities of a definite city 
or other community. The topography, population, political, finan- 
cial, industrial and other social conditions will be considered in their 
relation to actual and potential library work in the community. 
The results of the study must be submitted in thesis form and must 
be approved by the director, the vice director and such other persons 
as they may select. The vice director will suggest suitable com- 
munities and will confer from time to time with the students electing 
the course. Each student will be required either to take this course 
or to compile an original bibliography. 



14 NEW YORK STATE LIBRARY 

This study should furnish valuable training, especially to those 
students whose Pastes and aptitudes lie along the line of administra- 
tive rather than bibliographic work. The inclusion of this course 
has met the approval of many of our most successful former students. 

Loan work. Though planned on the same general lines as before, 
the course was considerably changed. Instruction was centered on 
the Newark, Browne and Coltimbia systems and the older systems, 
whose interest is largely historical, were treated only incidentally. 
A rather unusual amount of illustrative material in the shape of 
blanks and forms in use in different libraries was secured on the 
annual library visit. 

Notes and samples. The wisdom of this part -of the curriculum 
was fully justified by the aid received from the ** notes and samples " 
collections lent and given by former students (see pages 6-7). Not 
only did they help the faculty in reconstructing their work but the 
reproduced material was used largely in replacing personal collections 
lost by the students. Special mention should be made of Miss Ada 
Alice Jones's presentation to each member of the senior cataloging, 
course of a full duplicate set of notes, model cards, and outlines of 
her course. 

From the donated collections a very fair basis for a new technical 
collection has been made. Even the documentary history which 
included all official blanks, stencils, circulars etc., since the fotmding 
of the school has been restored in considerable degree from the 
material collected while the donors were students here. 

The collections presented for final inspection by this year's students 
were of necessity rather fragmentary but, through the generosity of 
libraries visited on the trip and the contributions of other friends 
it was possible for each student to reassemble a fairly representative 
collection of illustrative material. 

The Inland Printer's traveling exhibit of the work of the Inter- 
national Typographical Union course in printing was also at the 
service of the students for two weeks as additional illustrative aid. 

Practice work. Through the courtesy of the State Normal College 
and the Young Women's Christian Association the students aided 
in the reorganization of the libraries of these two institutions so that, 
(jespite the destruction of the State Library, the opportimities for 
practice work were thoroughly practical and quite sufficient for the 
students* needs. The work in these two libraries was under the 
general charge of Miss Fellows. 

Bibliographic practice for the seniors was obtained in the prepara- 
tion of study club programs for the Division of Educational Extension 
and in special work at the Library of Congress and other libraries. 



REPORT OF LIBRARY SCHOOL I9II 1 5 

Inasmuch as the reorganization of the State Library will not be 
sufficiently progressed to admit of much of the detailed practice 
work formerly g;iven in the State Library, one month of practice in 
some outside library will be required during the early spring in 
addition to such practice as may be obtained during the year under 
Miss Woodworth*s direction in the State Library and the libraries 
of Albany. A considerable number of excellent libraries have 
consented to cooperate in this matter of practice work. 

Under the new plan no summer practice will be required from 
juniors in the summer of 191 2. The following libraries afforded 
practice this summer (191 1) to such juniors as had not been excused 
from it on the basis of previous library experience: Chicago Public 
Library, Kingston (N.Y.) City Library, La Crosse (Wis.) Public 
Library, Library of Congress, Minneapolis Public Library, Nutley 
(N.J.) Public Library, Pruyn Library (Albany, N.Y.), Carnegie 
Library, Pittsburgh (Pa.), Pember Library (Granville, N.Y.), Troy 
(NY.) Public Library, Y.M.A. Library (Albany, N.Y.), Utica (N.Y.) 
Public Library, Washinpfton Universit}^ Library (St Louis, Mo.). 

Seminar. To permit some changes in the elementary admin- 
istration course seven seminar periods were devoted to topics primarily 
administrative in nature. Four of these were devoted to a discussion 
of the elements of parliamentary law by Miss Frances D. Lyon of 
the law library staff, who is also a member of the New York bar. 
Emphasis was laid on the points most likely to arise in trustees' 
meetings and some practice in presiding was given in a joint trustees' 
meeting and in several subsequent seminar periods. Three periods 
were given to a discussion of the principles underlying business 
correspondence and some practice given in drafting replies to actual 
letters received by the school. This practice will probably be in- 
creased in amount during the coming year. 

Four periods of the senior seminar including problems and informal 
discussions were taken up with general subjects of work with schools 
and instruction in library methods for teachers and high school 
pupils. Two lectures, one by Miss Mary E. Hall, librarian of the 
Brooklyn Girls High School, and one by Mr Sherman Williams, 
former superintendent of the Glens Falls (N.Y.) schools, added to 
the instruction given along this line. 

Annual library visit. Although scheduled for April 25th to May 
8th, the annual library visit was made April 4-17. This change, 
which was made possible only by the cordial cooperation of the libra- 



1 6 NEW YORK STATE LIBRARY 

ries visited and by the readiness with which the students adjusted 
their personal arrangements, afforded an opportunity to furnish and 
arrange the temporary quarters in the State Normal College. 

Valuable as this feature of the course has proved in the past, it 
was particularly beneficial this year. By no means the least of the 
benefits derived was the confidence inspired by the interest in and 
the sympathy for the school shown everywhere on the visit. This 
interest and sympathy were manifested not only verbally but in the 
very practical form of well-selected gifts of administrative blanks 
and library publications for the personal collections of the students 
as well as for the school files. 

Libraries in New York, Philadelphia, Washington and their 
vicinities were visited. A new feature was introduced by setting 
apart one afternoon for group visits to a number of libraries of 
varying types. As each student selected the kind of library in which 
he was most interested, this proved one of the most valuable parts 
of the entire trip. 

A brief schedule of the libraries visited follows: 
April 5 Newark Free Public Library; New York Public Library: 

Chatham Square and Seward Park branches. 
April 6 Brooklyn Public Library; Pratt Institute Library and 

Library School. 
April 7 Coltmibia University Library; Group visits to the follow- 
ing libraries: New York Public Library: 115th Street 
and Tompkins Square branches; College of the City of 
New York; New York University; Brooklyn Training 
School for Teachers; Queens Borough Public Library. 
April 8 Library of the Engineering Societies. 
April 10 Trenton Free Public Library; Free Library of Philadel- 
phia: Central, Josephine Widener and Spring Garden 
branches. 
April II Drexel Institute Library; Philadelphia Free Library: 

40th Street branch; University of Pennsylvania Li- 
brary; Bryn Mawr College Library. 
April 12 Library of Congress. 
April 13 Public Documents Library; District of Coltmibia Public 

Library. 
April 14 Army Museum and Library; Department of Agriculture 

Library. 

The heartiest thanks for the cordial treatment received and the 

opportunities afforded to observe in detail the work of the libraries 

are due to the librarian and staff of every library visited. Special 

thanks for social entertainment are due to the staff of the Seward 



REPORT OF LIBRARY SCHOOL I9II \J 

Park branch of the New York Public Library, the Pratt Institute 
Library and Library School, the Trenton Free Library and the New 
Jersey Library Confimission, the Drexel Institute Library School, 
and Miss Mary L. Jones of the Bryn Mawr College Library; and to 
the District of Columbia Library Association for a meeting and re- 
ception at which the Drexel Institute and the New York State Li- 
brary Schools were the guests of the association. 

Original bibliographies. One of the heaviest personal losses of 
the senior class was the destruction of their original bibliographies, 
many of which were practically finished. Fortunately, on account 
of the progress reports required during the year, it was possible to 
make a fair estimate of the work done and to make other arrange- 
ments for the completion of the reqtiired amount of work. The 
final lists submitted were of necessity much briefer than would be 
the case under normal conditions. The lists as submitted were as 
follows. 
Adams, Leta E. Dictionary catalog of pictures for schools and small 

libraries. Pt i : Italian paintings. 
Allen, Mrs Philip L., Carter, Sylvester J., and Brown, Helen D. Sir 

Arthur Pinero; plays and criticisms of his works. 
Eliot, Ruth F. Henry Arthur Jones; plays and criticisms of his 

works. 

These two lists will be incorporated in the revised edition of Modern dramatists 
(Boston Book Co. 191 1) 

Fordice, Frances. Women in trades, professions, industries and labor 

legislation; a selected list. 
Janvrin, C. E. Literature relating to the blind. 

A considerable ntimber of the manuscript bibliographies approved 
in previous years were saved in fair condition and will be available 
later for reference in the new quarters of the State Library. 

Degrees. The degree of bachelor of library science was conferred 
during the year upon the following persons: Florence Rising Curtis, 
1898; Edna May Sanderson, 1901; Asa Wynkoop, 1906; Mrs Mabel 
Eloise Colegrove, and Lillian Mabelle George, 19 10; and the follow- 
ing members of the class of 19 11: Leta Emma Adams, Mrs Philip 
Loring Allen, Helen Dalton Brown, Sylvester J. Carter, Ruth Forbes 
Eliot, Frances Fordice, Charles Edwin Janvrin. 

The total number of degrees conferred by the school to October 
1 , 1 9 1 1 , is : bachelor of library science, 151; master of library science, 3 . 

SUMMER SESSION 
Owing to the temporary lack of room and equipment, it was im- 
practicable to hold any summer school this year. It is hoped that 
the general course announced for 191 1 may be given in 191 2 instead. 



l8 NEW YORK STATE LIBRARY 

An attempt was made in the preliminary announcements of the 
course to interest the school librarians of the State in attending the 
summer school. The acting chief of the School Libraries Division 
sent to each city superintendent of the State a circular of the course 
with a letter calling attention to the necessity of better methods 
in conducting school libraries. Though this cooperation between the 
school and the School Libraries Division was ntillified by the post- 
ponement of the course, it is hoped that a similar effort to extend 
the benefits of the school to the teachers of the State may be made 

next year. 

THE ALUMNI 

During the past school year 98 positions filled by former students 
have been reported to the school, bringing the total number up to 
192 1. The number filled in New York State has increased to 736; 
97 have been filled in the District of Columbia; 1061 in 36 other 
states. The ntmiber filled in foreign countries remains the same, 
17. These figures include changes of position within the same li- 
brary as well as changes in location. 

It is probable that other positions have not been reported and 
that still others, noted in the records which were burned, have been 
overlooked in reconstructing these records. The school will be grate- 
ful for notices of any such omissions. 

There has been a slight increase during the past year in the average 
salary paid both to graduates and to first-year students and the de- 
mand for assistants trained in the school has considerably exceeded 
the available supply. In spite of a marked indisposition on the part 
of the students to accept beginning salaries as low as those sometimes 
considered in former years, there has been no unusual delay in secur- 
ing satisfactory positions. 

The copy for the revised register of the school is in preparation 
and the aid of every former student is requested to make it as ac- 
curate and complete as possible. As all the former records are gone, 
a full and accurate record of each student is important as a guide 
to prospective employers of former students as well as for its value 
as an historic record. To avoid misunderstanding it may be re- 
peated that what is desired is a complete professional record of every 
one who has ever been a student in the school, not merely a list of 
positions which the school authorities have been of direct or indirect 
aid in securing. 

A list of the library positions reported as filled from October i, 
1910, to September 30, 1911, follows: 



REPORT OF LIBRARY SCHOOL I9II 



19 



Positions filled October i, 1910-September 30, 191 1 



CLASS AND NAME 
1888 

Plummer, Mary W . . . . 

xSoa 

Foote, Elizabeth L 

1893 

Rathbone, Josephine A 

Sutliflf. Mary L 

X894 

Hawes, Clara S 

1807 
Waterman, Lucy D. . . . 

1900 
Mudge, Isadore G 

X90Z 
Pall. Drew B 

Maltbie. Anne L , 

1902 

Lamb, Eliza 

X903 

Brown. Zaidee M , 

McCurdy. Robert M.. 
Perry, Everett R 

M 

Dunham. Mary E . . . . 

Rose. Ernestine 

McKay. Mabel 

1935 

Hyde, Sophie 

Mitchell, Sydney B . . . 

Nerney. May C 

Wright, Rebecca W. . . 

XO06 
Dinsmoor, Kate E 

I9D7 

Coulter, Edith M 

Hadley, Chalmers .... 
Hemans, Ida M 

Z908 
Joslyn. Rosamond .... 

Moore, Dora P 

Smith, Elizabeth M . . . 

1909 

Adams, Leta E 

Blair, Irene E 

Hardman. Elizabeth . . 
Rhodes, Isabelli K. . . 
Wheeler. Joseph I 



POSITION 



Principal 

Librarian in charge, 125th St. branch 

Assistant director 

Instructor 

Librarian 

Cataloger 

Reference librarian 

Librarian 

Assistant 

Cataloger 

Agent 

Librarian. 

Chief, information department 

Librarian 

Librarian 

Registrar and instructor 

Librarian 

Order librarian 

Chief, order department 

Assistant 

Secretary 

Head cataloger 

Senior assistant, reference department 

Librarian 

Librarian 

Librarian 

Librarian's assistant 

First assistant, order section 

Head cataloger 

Reference assistant 

Librarian, Whitestone branch 

Assistant, reference section 

Librarian 



INSTITUTION AND PLACE 

(unless implied) 



New York Public Library School 



New York Public Library 



Pratt Institute School of Library 

Science, Brooklyn 
New York Public Library School 



Y. M. C. A. Training School 
Library, Springfield, Mass. 

Carnegie Library, Pittsbtirgh 



Columbia University Library, 
New York City 

Somerville (Mass.) Public Li- 
brary 

Columbia University Library, 
New York City 

Coast Artillery School Library, 
Fortress Monroe, Va. 

Massachusetts Free Public Li- 
brary Commission, Boston 

Young Men's Mercantile Library 
Association. Cincinnati 

New York Public Library 

Los Angeles Public Library 



Iowa State Teachers College, 

Cedar Falls 
New York Public Library School 
Pruyn Library, Young Men's 

Association, Albany 

University of Minnesota Library, 
Minneapolis 

California University Library, 
Berkeley 

California State Library, Sacra- 
mento 

Vermont Free Library Commis- 
sion, Montpelier 

Kansas State Library 



California University Library, 

Berkeley 
Denver Public Library 
State Normal School Library, 

Geneseo, N. Y. 

High School Library, Jamaica, 

Lt, X. 
Colgate University Library, 

Hamilton, N. Y. 
New York State Library 



University of Missouri Library, 
Columbia 

University of Texas Library, 
Austin 

Queens Borough Public Library 

New York State Library 

JacksonviUe (Fla.) Public Li- 
brary _^ 



20 



NEW YORK STATE LIBRARY 



Positions filled October i, 1910-September 30, 191 1 (continued) 



CLASS AND NAME 



19x0 

Amett, Lonna D 

Callahan, Lilian J 

Cunningham, Jesse . . . . 
Fullerton, Pauline V. . . 
George, Lillian M 

Hill, Galen W 

Holdridge, Kathreen. . . 

u 

Joeckel, Carleton B . . . . 

Kaiser, John B 

Sherwood, Ethel A. 
(Mrs Paul Bucher) 

Wakefield, Bertha 

xgxx 

Blehr, Marit 

Brown, Helen D 

Carter, Sylvester J 

Eliot, Ruth F 

Gilbert, Gertrude M . . . 

Leitch, Harriet E 

Stronge, Lulu A 

Tarr, Anna M 

Topping, Elizabeth R. . 

West, Josephine R 

19x2 

Bailev, Louise M 

Benedict, Georgia 

Carnegie, Elza K 

Enright, Daisy M 

Gamble, William B . . . . 
Hamilton. William J. . . 

Johnsen, Marie E 

Jones, Mildred K 

Kelly, Frances H 

Krausnick, Gertrude. . . 

Leonard, Miriam E 

McCauley, Pauline .... 
^Matthews, Gertrude. . . 
Miller, Emily V. D . . . . 
iRawson, Fannie C. 

(special student) 
Rice, Paul N 

^Richardson, Mary C. . . 

Tinkham, Mabel 

Tompkins. Helen W . . . 
iWatts, Blanche V 



POSITION 



Librarian 

Assistant, Division of Educational 
Extension 

Assistant to director 

Assistant, information dep£lrtment. . . 
Head classifier and cataloger 

Librarian 

Cataloger 

Assistant reference librarian 

Departmental librarian. Economics 

and sociologry 
Assistant 

Head cataloger 

Assistant, central children's depart- 
ment 

Assistant cataloger 

Senior assistant in charge of reference 
work 

Assistant cataloger 

Cataloger 

Librarian, Edge water subbranch. . . . 
Assistant, leged department 

Librarian 

Assistant 

Assistant, central circulation depart- 
ment 

Cataloger 

Assistant 

Assistant 

Librarian 

Chief, technology division 

In charge of useful arts department . . 

Assistant, catalog department 

Assistant 

Assistant, loan department 

Assistant 

Assistant cataloger 

First assistant. Wylie Avenue branch. 

Librarian 

Children's librarian. Walker branch. . 
Secretary 

Assistant, reference department 

Librarian 

Cataloger and reference librarian .... 

Assistant 

Librarian 



INSTITUTION AND PLACE 

(unless implied) 



University of West Virginia Li- 
brary, Morgantown 
New York State Library 

St Louis Public Library 

New York Public Library 

Purdue University Library, La- 
fayette, Ind. 

Millicent Library, Fairhaven, 
Mass. 

Carnegie Library, Homestead 
Pa. 

Iowa State College, Ames 

University of California Library, 
Berkeley 

University of Illinois Library, 
Urbana 

United States Department of 
Agriculture Library, Wash- 
ington 

Seattle Public Library 



New York Public Library 

John Crerar Library, Chicago 
Milwaukee Public Library 

University of Minnesota Library, 
Minneapolis 

United States Department of 
Agriculture Library, Wash- 
ington 

Cleveland Public Library 

American Telephone and Tele- 
graph Company, New York 
City 

Clinton (la.) Public Library 

Library Association, Portland, 
Ore. 

New York Public Library 



Connerticut State Library 
New York State Library 
Carnegie Library, Pittsbtirgh 
Nutley (N. J.) Public Library 
New York Public Library 
Minneapolis Public Library 
Cleveland Public Library 
Utica (N. Y.) Public Library 
Carnegie Library, Pittsburgh 
Washington University Library, 

St Louis 
Minneapolis Public Library 
Carnegie Library, Pittsburgh 
Waco (Tex.) Public Library 
Minneapolis Public Library 
Kentucky Library Ck)mmission, 

Frankfort 
Ohio State University Library. 

Columbus 
Eastern State Normal School 

Library, Castine. Me. 
Gary (Ind.) Public Library 
New York State Library School 
Morningside Osllege Library, 

Sioux City, la. 



^On leave of abience, 1910-11. Returned to f jrmer position at end of school year. 



REPORT OF LIBRARY SCHOOL I9II 



21 



Temporary positions 



CLASS AND NAME 
1894 

Bullock, Edna D 

1896 

Curtis, Florence R. . . . 

x8o7 

Hopkins, Julia A 

Smith, Bessie S 

Z900 

Mudge, Isadore G 

1901 

Vought, Sabra W 

Z903 

Blunt, Florence T 

Hepburn, William M.. 

zop4 

Mumford, Rosalie .... 

M 

Peck, Harriet R 

Z905 

Wright, Rebecca W. . . 

Z908 

Hart, Fanny 

Hooker, D. Ashley. . . . 

Kimball, Florence B . . 

Shaver, Mary M 

Hardman, Elisabeth . . 

19ZZ 

Fordice, Frances 

« 
Janvrin, Charles E. . . . 

Topping, Elizabeth R. 

19x2 

Bailey, Louise M 

Keator, Alfred D 

Lewis, Margaret M . . . 



POSITION 



t 

Organizer 

Instructor. Indiana Summer Library 
School 

Instructor, Summer Library course. . 

Acting director 

Editor, annual supplements and five 
yearly consolidation of Kroeger's 
Guide to the Study and Use of Ref- 
erence Books 

Instructor, Summer Library School. . 

Instructor, Summer Library 

Instructor, Indiana Summer Library 
School 

Cataloger ; 

Cataloger 

Instructor in charge. Summer Library 
course 

Cataloger 

Cataloger 

Cataloger 

Cataloger 

Cataloger 

Cataloger 

Cataloger 

Organizer 

Cataloger 

Assistant in charge of debate libraries 

Cataloger 

Summer assistant 

Cataloger. 



INSTITUTION AND PLACE 

(unless implied) 



Muskogee (Okla.) Public Library 



Earlham College, Richmond 



Pennsylvania Free Library Com- 
, mission. State College 
^Western Reserve University Li- 
brary School, Cleveland 



Chautauqua, N. Y. 



Simmons College, Boston 
Earlham College, Richmond 



Theological Seminary Library, 
, Rochester, N. Y. 
Louisville Free Public Library 
Sinmions College, Boston 



Kellogg-Hubbard Library, Mont- 
pelier, Vt. 

Private library, New York City 
U. S. Military Academy Library, 

West Point, N. Y. 
Kellogg-Hubbard Library, Mont- 

pelier, Vt. 
Vassar College Library, Pough'- 

keepsie, N. Y. 

Waterloo (N. Y.) Public Library 



Mr F. Ambrose Clark's private 
library, Cooperstown, N. Y. 

St Albans (Vt.) Public Library 

Dr E. M. Stanton's private li- 
brary, Schenectady, N. Y. 

Oregon Library Commission, 
Salem 

Connecticut State Library 
Newark (N. J.) Free PubUc Li- 
brary 
Bishop William Croswell Doane's 
private library, Albany, N. Y. 



22 NEW YORK STATE LIBRARY 

New York State Library School Association. At a meeting held 
at the Hotel Maryland, May 23, 191 1, diiring the Pasadena meeting 
of the American Library Association the following officers were 
elected: 

President, William Murray Hepburn '03. Librarian, Purdue Uni- 
versity,' Lafayette, Ind. 
1st Vice President y Anna Redfield Phelps '01. Library organizer, 

New York State Library 
2d Vice President, Harold Lewis Leupp '04. Associate librarian. 

University of California, Berkeley, Cal. 
Secretary-treasurer, Bessie Sargeant Smith '97. Librarian, Carnegie 

West Branch, Cleveland (O.) Public Library 
Member of advisory board, 1911-14, Mary Letitia Jones *92. Li- 
brarian, Bryn Mawr College, Bryn Mawr, Pa. 
Executive board, Mary Esther Robbins '^2, chairman. Library School 
faculty, Simmons College, Boston; Charles James Barr *o2, assistant 
librarian, John Crerar Library, Chicago; Caroline Melvin Under- 
bill, '89, librarian, Utica (N. Y.) Public Library 
A telegram expressing confidence and pledging the loyalty of the 
association to the school was sent by the association to the director 
and the faculty. Forty-seven were present at the dinner preceding 
the meeting. 

During the year every member of the advisory board lectured be- 
fore the school. The board at present consists of the following 
members: 
1909-12. Edwin Hatfield Anderson '92. Assistant director, New 

York Public Library 
1910-13. Arthur Low Bailey '98. Librarian, Wilmington In- 
stitute Free Library, Wilmington, Del. 
1911-14. Mary Letitia Jones '92. Librarian Bryn Mawr College, 
chairman 

In addition to the expressions of loyalty and the pledges of in- 
terest in the school, the association gave a concrete example of the 
practical nature of its interest by authorizing the advisory board 
** to expend a sum not to exceed $100, for books or equipment for 
the Library School as they deem best." 

Mention has been made elsewhere of the aid received from in- 
dividual former students. Not a week has passed since the fire 
which has not brought words of confidence from former students 
and while such a feeling is generally held by hundreds of library 
workers throughout the country, the school has an asset whose direct 
value can not be estimated. 



REPORT OF LIBRARY SCHOOL I9I I 23 

Necrology. The only deaths among former students during the 
past year were those of Miss Irene Gibson who attended the school 
from October 1892 to June 1893 and Rev. Leonard J. Dean, who died 
August, 191 1. At the time of her death, which occurred July 9, 
191 1, Miss Gibson was a member of the staff of the Library of Con- 
gress, which service she entered in 1902. Mr Dean attended the 
school from October, 1892 to February,' 1893. For some time 
previous to his death he had been engaged in pastoral work in 
Troy, N. Y. 

(For full list of deceased former students see Report of the New 

York State Library School, 1908, page 22; 1909, page 22; 1910, 

page 21.) 

NOTES AND COMMENTS 

Library meetings. The school attended in a body the meeting 
of the District of Coltimbia Library Association on the evening of 
April 12, 191 1. A considerable ntimber also attended the district 
meeting held in the Gtiild House of the Cathedral of All Saints, 
May 26, 191 1, under the auspices of the New York Library Asso- 
ciation. Miss Mary C. Richardson of the class of 191 2 acted as 
secretary pro tem of the library section of the State Teachers Asso- 
ciation at Rochester, December 28, iqio. 

Quarters for 1911-12. September 18, 191 1 the school quarters 
were moved from the State Normal College to the top floor of the 
Guild House of the Cathedral of All Saints where they will remain 
until the completion of the rooms assigned to the school in the new 
State Education Building. These will probably be completed during 
the school year 1911-12. Individual tables, a separate classroom, 
shelf room for a working collection of books, facilities for night 
work and many other conveniences which would have been impos- 
sible in the crowded State Normal College are provided for by the 
removal to the Guild House. 

The main study room is approximately 48 by 70 feet and with 
the classroom on the floor below, provides the most spacious loca- 
tion the school has ever occupied, not excepting the old quarters 
in the State Capitol. With the exception of a small space occupied 
by the library for the blind, the entire room is devoted to the work 
of the school. Considerable time in the preparation of classwork 
will be saved by shelving the working collection (including essential 
reference books) in the room itself instead of on another floor as was 
the case in the old State Library. The collection serves as a working 
reference room for the staff of the State Library as well as for the 
use of the school. 



24 NEW YORK STATE LIBRARY 

Quite as valuable is the presence in other parts of the building 
of the unused stock of the traveling library section and the acces- 
sions to the State Library which make the rapidly gi'owing resources 
of the library easily available for school use. The staffs of the book 
selection section and of the Division of Educational Extension are 
also located in the Guild House so that the entire building is devoted 
to library use. Association with members of the library staff and 
observation of their work is consequently made much easier than 
if the school were in isolated rooms at a distance from other sections 
of the library. 

Future of the school. Although forecasting the future is always 
a difficult and dangerous matter, several marked tendencies of the 
past year have at least indicated several strong probabilities for the 
future. 

. Probably the two real services of the fire to the school have been 
the demonstration of its essential stability and the forced oppor- 
ttmity given it of' revising its work and, in this revision, of distin- 
guishing the essential from the accidental. 

Stability was shown in the comparative ease with which the 
year was completed under adverse conditions and in the face of 
obstacles that were bewildering in variety. With all the equipment 
gone, a choice had to be made between essentials and non-essentials 
and both faculty and students discovered somewhat to their sur- 
prise that many details which had seemed of major importance 
were, after all, accessories rather than necessities. At the same 
time, it was a real pleasure to see in the forced revision of every 
unfinished course that getting down to fundamentals required little 
serious shifting either of plan or of general point of view. 

The readiness with which the faculty rose to emergencies and the 
excellent teamwork which prevailed should be a sufficient answer 
to the charge that library schools are always incapable of getting 
out of instructional ruts. 

There was no period of depression to overcome. Faculty and stu- 
dents alike were put on their mettle and, if any comparison can be 
made between the work of the two periods, it seems fair to say that 
what the work of the latter part of the year lacked in polish acquired 
under earlier and more favorable conditions was more than com- 
pensated for by the greater vigor and enthusiasm with which the 
problems of the later period were attacked. 

There seems no good reason for pessimism as regards the school's 
future. There has been an imusual number of applicants for admis- 
sion. The expressions of confidence received from former students, 



REPORT OF LIBRARY SCHOOL I9II 2$ 

from friends of the school throughout the country, and the attitude 
of the students in the school at the time are all indicative of general 
confidence that the school will continue its work of giving first-class 
instruction in library science. 

In the very near future there will be ready new quarters whose 
convenience will very materially aid in promoting good work and in 
economizing energy. There is every reason to believe that the New 
York State Library will very shortly take its place again among the 
great libraries of the country. Its regular appropriation for main- 
tenance assures the usual large ntimber of current accessions. 

In addition to the regular appropriation additional aid is provided 
in a bill introduced into the Legislature September 6, 191 1 in which 

The Commissioner of Education is . . . authorized and 
directed, pursuant to the rules of the Regents of the University of 
the State of New York to take such measures, make such contracts 
and incur such traveling and other expenses, not exceeding in the 
aggregate the stmi of one million two htmdred and fifty thousand 
dollars ($1,250,000), as may be necessary to reestablish and enlarge 
the State Library, by gathering suitable books, pamphlets, manu- 
scripts and other materials ... so as not only to restore the 
loss and remedy the damages to the State Library and to the State 
Museum collections therein occasioned by the fire which occurred 
in the State Capitol on the twenty-ninth day of March, nineteen 
hundred and eleven, but also so as to create in the course of years 
a comprehensive State Library which will meet the varied needs of 
the government and the people of the State of New York. . . . 
The sum of fifty thousand dollars ($50,000) or as much thereof as 
may be necessary, which shall be available immediately, is hereby 
appropriated out of any moneys in the State treasury not otherwise 
appropriated, for the purpose of carrying out the provisions of this 
section.^ 

Even under ordinary conditions the growth of the library has been 
rapid and with this large amount of additional resources its re- 
establishment as a good working library will be a matter of months 
rather than years. It will, moreover, be more than a miscellaneous 
aggregation of books. Not only will there be room in the new Edu- 
cation Building for the systematic arrangement of the accumulations 
of many years to come but it seems beyond a doubt that this system- 
atizing will take place rapidly for the problem facing the State 
Library is unique. There is no new staff to be trained to work 
together but a force of veteran workers, with an esprit de corps 
already established and an intimate knowledge of the minute de- 
tails needed to restore the library to its former position. The new 
problems which must be faced will furnish an opportimity for a 

iThe bill passed both houses and was approved by the Governor Oct. 24 191 1. 



26 NEW YORK STATE LIBRARY 

Study in library organization which will probably be unparalleled 
in American library history. The school also escapes the trials 
which beset the first years of a new institution for its faculty is 
practically intact and the continuity of the school and its work un- 
broken. 

Some of our former students who have not kept closely in touch 
with the school may remember its rather tincertain official status 
in its earlier days and may for that reason feel unduly apprehensive 
about its future. In such cases a brief mention of present con- 
ditions may prove reassuring. 

At the regular meeting of the Regents of the University of the 
State of New York, December 14, 1905, the Commissioner of Edu- 
cation made the following recommendation : 

As some doubts seem to have arisen concerning the continuance 
of the State Library School it may be well to set them at rest by the 
definite announcement that it is the purpose to maintain the school 
permanently upon the highest practicable plane of efficiency and use- 
fulness. 

The Regents thereupon recorded their approval of the recommenda- 
tion as follows: 

Votedy That the announcement be made that it is the purpose 
to maintain ths Library School permanently upon the highest prac- 
ticable plane of efficiency and usefulness. 

The sincerity of the statement has been fully proved by subse* 
quent actions of the Board and by the attitude of the Commissioner 
of Education in many cases in which the work of the school came 
under his immediate attention, and never has he deserved the grati- 
tude of all its friends more than by his help in the recent crisis. 
The New York State Library School has become an officially recog- 
nized part of the educational system of the State, and in crises that 
would have snuffed out an institution of low vitality it has proved 
its ability to do good work under adverse conditions. These con- 
ditions have already proved to be only temporary and we face the 
future with well-grounded confidence that the purpose of the Regents 
will be fulfilled and that the Library School will be maintained ** per- 
manently upon the highest practicable plane of efficiency and use- 
fulness.'* 



REPORT OF LIBRARY SCHOOL IQII 2'J 

Publications. In addition to the routine administrative blanks 
and forms, all of which were necessarily reprinted, the following 
publications of the school were issued during 1911-1912: 

24th annual report, 1910. 25p. 1910. 

Circular of information, Stmimer session, 191 1. 4p. 191 1. 

Circular of information, 191 1-12, 26p. 1911. 

Librarianship, an uncrowded calling. 23P. 191 1. 

Librarianship as a profession. 32P. 1911. 
2d edition, with changed title, of preceding entry. 

Library handwriting, up. 191 1 . 

New and slightly revised edition of the circular of the same title pub- 
lished in 1908.